Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Hip dysplaxia

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by cinnamontoast, Mar 26, 2011.


  1. cinnamontoast

    cinnamontoast Sois pas chiant, chéri.

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    12,129
    Likes Received:
    2,190
    Zak has had an x ray today which shows his right femur is not sat comfortably in the socket. There's an obvious gap.:( we noticed he was holding it funny this week.

    He's had the first of a series of cartrophen injections and will be on extremely restricted exercise. Because he's 9 months, the vet says this may resolve, but I don't see how.

    If you have experience of this, can you please tell me at what age you found out the dog had it, anything that's helped, any supplements/treatments and any optimistic stories would be gratefully received.
     
  2. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Messages:
    13,824
    Likes Received:
    408
    As you may know Flynn had severe dysplasia in both hips, I did try Cartrophen injections for him but as his was so bad we knew they wouldn't really help.
    The main thing I was told was to gently build up the muscles around the hips and a good way of doing this is hydrotherapy. I know other people with Mals who have dysplasia and they also have hydrotherapy with excellent results, never going down the surgical route.
    I use supplements for all the Mals such as glucosamine/chondroitin & msm plus green lipped muscle tabs.
    Kali has mild dysplasia and was taking Metacam but since being on supplements i've stopped the Metacam completely and she is never stiff - I think the supplements have worked far better then the Metacam ever did personally. She never gets a little stiff after her walks now. I used to use expensive supplements but googled the ingredients of a few and found them to be the same as Asda chondroitin/glucosamine/msm, so switched over to them, £3.50 for 30 tabs.
    I also use salmon oil a few times a week but I think you can't beat hydrotherapy myself. Cartrophen is wonderful and has properties that actually aid ligament and tendon strength, so a good road to go down.
    As you can see by Flynns x ray nothing other than surgery would have helped him for long.[​IMG]
    I first noticed something was wrong at about one year of age and he deteriorated rapidly, only being able to comfortably walk for around 20 mins at a time. He had his left hip replaced last August and is having the right replaced on April 11th. But as I said his was a very severe case. ;)
     
    Jo P likes this.
  3. Scorcher has HD she has not been x-rayed because its clear, she has lost most of her muscles in her hind legs due to not using them as she should be. She's 11 but only started with it badly in early Jan after a slip on some ice.
    She is on Tramadol and PLT however drugs may not be the main focus on a young dog. Hydrotherapy is something we are looking into at the moment.

    Big hugs to you.
     
  4. SixStar

    SixStar Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    Messages:
    12,852
    Likes Received:
    3,763
    I found out my Mastiff had HD at a year old, we adopted him at 8/9 months and we suspected it then, but it wasn't diagnosed until he was coming up for a year. He only has it reasonably mildly, so was put on metacam and stayed on that, on and off, for about a year, supplemented with Jointaid supplement. Neither did much for him, so after hearing great things about the Mobile Bones supplement by Pooch & Mutt, we thought we'd give that a go and we haven't looked back since. 3 weeks after starting it he was able to come off his Metacam and has only been on it a handful of times since- and these times are only after he had slipped, fell, overdone exercise etc. I can't recommended it enough, it's brilliant stuff- has allowed Blue to live the life a young dog should. He does hydrotherapy on the cheap (ie, the good ol' lake!) and has moderate exercise of about 1 1/2 hours a day, and you'd never really know anything was wrong with him. He can be a little stiff getting out of bed or after a cold and wet walk, but apart from that, he's fine really.

    Be careful to limit/prevent jumping- ie, on/off the sofa, into the car etc. If Bear is liftable, make sure he's lifted into/out of the car and never allowed to jump- if he's too heavy, there are some brilliant lightweight ramps available. I got mine off eBay for £22 second hand, because at 70kg, Blue is a tad too heavy to lift! :eek:
     
  5. Dally Banjo

    Dally Banjo PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2009
    Messages:
    17,694
    Likes Received:
    461
    Banjo was 3 & half when we found out he had HD in his left hip & osteoarthritus in his back etc because he had been compensating for his hip with his other legs, his back is the worst affected :( He has hydro physio every week & accupuncture every 3 weeks :thumbup: he also has Tramadol, Prevecox & Synoquin. A coat to keep him warm & dry in bad weather & a ramp to get in & out of the car :)

    You cant tell there is anything wrong with him at the mo but if he does to much :rolleyes: then he is wobbly & stiff.

    I would think that your dog has a good chance of living comfortably with HD as you have found out early before he can do any more damage to his other joints I would get him on a joint suppliment as soon as & hydro if you can :)
     
  6. Debxan

    Debxan PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    200
    Likes Received:
    3
    I am not sure about drugs for treating this problem but can tell you about my dog's experience.

    My labrador was diagnosed with hip displasia at the age of 8 months and had an operation one month later. The operation at the time (25 years ago) was major and took over 4 hours. I think it is a lot quicker now.

    The recovery for my dog was slow and he was in a lot of pain for about 2 weeks. During this time we had to support him when he walked with a towel around his middle to take some of the weight off his hips. The first week was terrible and he cried with every step and at night. We took it in turns to sleep on the floor of the lounge with him as he seemed comforted by our presence and liked to be stroked during the night. My mum and I cried with him on several occasions. The vet did give us pain killers which helped a bit.

    However, he made a full recovery and never looked back. Within months he was running, jumping and swimming and once his coat grew back no-one would have guessed he had ever had a problem. There was no on going drugs or treatment. He was a bit arthritic in later life but the dear old boy lived to be over 14 years of age and had a wonderful, active life.

    If your dog has to have the operation take comfort from my story. If your vet recommends an operation it may be the best thing as once it is done, it is done. I wish you all the best.
     
  7. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Messages:
    13,824
    Likes Received:
    408
    It is a lot quicker now, Flynns op took two hours, he didn't show any sign of pain as he had a Fentanyl (morphine) patch on his side, Rimadyl 100mg twice daily and ACP tablets three times daily to keep him relaxed. He had a sling which he had to be partially supported by for ten weeks post op. Crate rest for six weeks then partial for a further six (if I wasn't around to supervise him) and has now - six months later fully recovered.

    I'm so happy with his outcome that he's having the other one done soon. If ever it gets too bad I think this is a brilliant option, I didn't want him having a restricted life and on meds for ever. Mind you it isn't cheap so insurance is a must! ;)
     
  8. Debxan

    Debxan PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    200
    Likes Received:
    3
    2 hours is fantastic! Things have obviously moved on since my experience.

    I so agree though with this operation. When I think of the years of life our dog had and the fantastic times we had with him. I would do it again - put it that way.
     
  9. JJAK

    JJAK PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2,225
    Likes Received:
    29
    Jess has HD,
    We dont have her xrays but basically her hips dont sit in the sockets correctly. and the 'balls' arnt 'balls' one is square and one is shaped like a triangle.

    Shes just turned 2, but has had it 'noticably' since we got her just after a year old.

    At the moment, vets have said to do...nothing!
    Other than make sure shes on the lower end of her 'ideal weight' and make sure she gets a good does of Omega 3 each day, plus shes on flexadin tablets every day (Flexadin) and a dose of MSM each day. vets have also said to keep doing 'exacally what we were doing with her' but just in a much slower, and controlled fashion. Theyve said they see no reaosn why she wont live a long and healthy life and provided it is managed correctly she wont need any more treatment for the foreseeable future.

    Although, they have said at some point she *will* need the £6000 operation to remove the balls of her hips!
     
  10. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Messages:
    13,824
    Likes Received:
    408
    Hi jjak - have you seen an orthopaedic specialist about her, primary care vets are not that up on orthopaedics and if she ever needed surgery she's at a good age now, so much easier for a younger dog to recover.
    I think what your vet is talking about is Femoral Head Osteotomy, where the femoral head is removed and scar tissue forms a socket over time.
    Total hip replacement is where the entire ball and socket are removed and replaced by metal ones - like Flynns below.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    It looks out of line with the other hip because the other hip is so out of socket but when he has the next one done he'll be even at last.
    He had his done here; Veterinary Practice & Hospital | Specialist Orthopaedics + Neurosurgery | Fitzpatrick Referrals and i'd thoroughly recommend them, they will answer an e mail if you want to ask questions. This op cost £5,500 but Flynn is a very large dog and he had a replacement that bone grows on to.
    Sorry cinammon toast, hope you don't mind and I hope this info helps you with your boy too. ;)
     
    #10 Malmum, Mar 26, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2011
  11. cinnamontoast

    cinnamontoast Sois pas chiant, chéri.

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    12,129
    Likes Received:
    2,190
    You are all fab, frankly!

    Zak is always lfted in and out of the car (4x4 so a bit high for a pup). All of them are, even Brig. I don't like the impact onto our concrete drive.

    They're all insured so operations are possible but I think I should wait and see as currently it's 'mild'. Jake snapped both cruciates so we know about cage rest, restricted exercise, supporting him when going out if necessary. We did unofficial hydro with him in the river nearby.

    Malmum, you're a star putting the x ray on. Did Flynn's get worse before the op? It looks really severe, poor lad. :( Ours wouldn't pay for Jake's second as they said it was the same condition. We're in a position to pay if we need operations.

    I'm delighted to hear that peoples' dogs were able to live quality lives after intervention, be it surgical or medicinal. Asda tomorrow, but what dose for a 20kg pup?

    I need to get salmon oil as I should be giving it on a raw diet anyway, think. I keep hearing about seroquin (sp?)-dunno if that's a good supplement? I'll look on hyper drug in a second for green lipped mussel and that, might try turmeric too.
     
    #11 cinnamontoast, Mar 26, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2011
  12. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Messages:
    13,824
    Likes Received:
    408
    Yes it did get worse before the op and his right is getting worse at the mo too. Yesterday he was in the garden and when he got up he let out a loud cry, something he never does as he's really quite brave. I instantly felt sick, lol and went out but he walked around the garden whimpering, I think he'd laid in a weird way and hurt the hip as he got up. I knew it was his hip because as he came towards me and sat down I heard it "clunk" so it has worsened as the left was the worst at the time of his op, the reason Noel did that one first.
    Flynn's not three yet, has the second highest hip score for a Mal in the country (55 BMS 13) and I thought, as did my vet, that he'd be crippled by five if he didn't have the op as well as being in constant pain and on meds. As i've said his was very severe, the Mal with the highest hip score has worked most of his life but getting older so doesn't work now but his is 69. Noel said it's not about the score though, it's about the x ray and he could see Flynn needed surgery, well you didn't need x rays to see that.
    I don't want to scare anyone as most dogs don't need surgery but our experience has been all positive, the reason I put the Diary Of A Hip Replacement thread up.
    Shame about your insurance, it must be "per condition" luckily mine is "lifetime" so he's covered for this next op too. If he wasn't I don't know what i'd do - sell my daughters I think! :D
     
  13. cinnamontoast

    cinnamontoast Sois pas chiant, chéri.

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    12,129
    Likes Received:
    2,190
    Seraquin is a joint supplement, specially formulated to help maintain healthy joint function in dogs. Seraquin tablets 2g for dogs contains high quality ingredients, and is palatable. .

    Seraquin contains high quality ingredients, and is palatable.

    Seraquin contains a unique combination of 3 compounds:
    Glucosamine Hydrochloride- provides aminosugars known to promote the manufacture of cartilage and synovial fluid.
    Chondroitin- Provides building blocks for the synthesis of glucosaminoglycans (cartilage building blocks)
    Curcumin- A potent natural antioxident which reduces the damaging effects of oxidative stress.

    Each tablet contains 500mg Glucosamine and 380mg Chondroitin

    As Seraquin is designed to support the joint, rather than treat the symptons of pain and inflammation, you may not see an immediate effect. We recommend 4-6 weeks at the initial level

    ^ from a supplement website


    So, may as well get separate glucosamine, chondroitin. Is curcumin the same as cumin as in the spice, I wonder?
     
  14. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Messages:
    13,824
    Likes Received:
    408
    My vet said you can't overdo glucosamine etc. as the body will expell any not used, so Flynn has two a day. Don't know about the cumin though, not all that up on cooking and stuff, the only thing food wise I like preparing are the dogs meals - no complaints from them and can't burn raw either! :D
     
  15. Flossy11

    Flossy11 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2011
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    It is definitely worth waiting here and persisting with this conservative approach as a fair few dogs with HD will stabilise when reaching skeletal maturity (10-12 months) which precludes the need for major surgery.

    If the response to conservative treatment (pain control (NSAIDs, tramadol), joint supplements, exercise restriction) is inadequate then surgery is an option. In skeletally immature dogs, one op that can be done is called triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO). There is also a procedure involving transection of a muscle (pectineal myectomy). In skeletally mature dogs then the procedure of choice is total hip replacement (THR).

    I think Seraquin is an excellent joint supplement (or Synoquin) - I would go with it any day of the week over other forms of glucosamine due to very high bioavailability (quality if you like); also there is believed to be much better absorption of glucosamine hydrochloride in dogs than glucosamine sulphate (in most human preps).

    I also think hydrotherapy (water treadmill) and physiotherapy would be very helpful - helping to build up muscle around the hip joints.
     
  16. swarthy

    swarthy PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2010
    Messages:
    5,742
    Likes Received:
    284
    Surprisingly it can - my friend's Lab had his hip plates taken (no lameness) when he was just over 1, and the vet warned then that the hips hadn't 'setled' and his hips (while not horrendous) definitely weren't as good at that point as the dog scored with him at the same time.

    Fast forward 18 months - the dog was hipscored (plates taken by the same vet) and came in BELOW the scores of the other dog scored at the same time - and both below the breed average.

    Obviously if your dog has lameness - there might be a problem - but I've seen some very good effects with Cartophen - so fingers crossed things might settle down.

    Unfortunately, all this ties in with the reasons behind why exercise should be restricted during the first 12 months of life - because however good the breeding - we don't yet have a clear idea of whether a pup mayb have a predisposition to HD.

    Hope things settle down for your boy and that he doesn't need surgery - if he does - then it is often very successful - take a look at the Labrador Healh website - there are quite a few dogs on there that have had surgery for HD.


    ======================================

    Since my girl injured her knee, I have been working with a local physio clinic that has an under water treadmill and also offers other treatments such as ultrasound, acupuncture, supplements and cartrophen - they share a building with the local orthopaedic specialist - sadly - being in the area we are - they see more than their fair share of HD and other joint problems.

    All youngsters are referred to the clinic - and to date, only one dog has gone on to need surgery - that's one hell of an achievement.
     
  17. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Messages:
    13,824
    Likes Received:
    408
    Flynn has had water treadmill hydro and it may have helped, not sure as he was still lame but it was £40 a time for 20 mins - attached to a vet surgery :rolleyes: where as the pool hydro was only £16 but he couldn't have that because he had to be hoisted and Noel said that was a no no after his surgery! The pool at Fitzpatricks is a walk in one but as it's a 6 hour round trip just can't do it for a 30 min swim. :(
     
  18. cinnamontoast

    cinnamontoast Sois pas chiant, chéri.

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    12,129
    Likes Received:
    2,190
    The hydro pool is 5 minutes' walk.

    We have been restricting exercise, the 5 minutes per month rule. Zak is very lively, tho and entertains himself by pinging from one side of the garden to the other. There'll be no more unsupervised garden access. :(
     
  19. swarthy

    swarthy PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2010
    Messages:
    5,742
    Likes Received:
    284

    It sounds that by doing so you could well have saved your boy from a temporary issue which could rectify itself and facing full blown dysplasia and the need for major surgical intervention - I do wish others would take note of what a difference being sensible can make.

    What I would say is (and it's a bit of a catch 22 situation really) - confining an active dog can make them like a coiled spring when they are 'released' - so any other ways you can find of stimulating him and tiring him out might be of use ;)
     
  20. CarrieH

    CarrieH PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2011
    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    2
    I'm at the opposite end of the scale from you in terms of my dog's age, so can't really offer much advice. Ben had x-rays about 4 1/2 years ago to diagnose arthritis and at that point mild hip dysplaxia was also found. I firmly believe I had a very poor vet who basically wrote off Ben's chances. I was told he'd never have any quality of life and would never be able to do more than a 5 minute onlead walk per day. I was being given the strongest hints that he should be PTS. In the end we ignored the vet and registered with a new one. Ben has glucosamine and chrondroitin tablets and until a few months ago could do 9 miles at weekend (slower paced and with regular breaks). One thing I have noticed with Ben is that over time his back legs have got closer together, so his hocks will hit together some days. Sometimes on days like that we don't walk or just have shorter walks. I don't know whether that problem is because of his hips or arthritis.
    Ben is thought to be about 11 now and it's only in recent weeks we've started having problems, but that's because his arthritis is spreading into his spine. He's currently back on metacam (try to keep him off metacam as much as possible to avoid long term health issues) and also on tramadol. Looking at new supplements for him and also want to investigate hydrotherapy.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice