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Hip Dysplasia & Luxating Patella on our 2 year old Chi :(

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Baby_Lola, Aug 2, 2019.


  1. Baby_Lola

    Baby_Lola PetForums Junior

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    Hi everyone

    Last week our 2-year-old Chuwawa was diagnosed with Hip Dysplasia & Luxating Patella, her hips are not that severe but her knee caps are at stage 4, which is the highest stage.

    Were so devastated, the poor thing, she has so much life in her I am going crazy trying to figure out what to do and where to begin. We have been referred to a specialist at the Royal Vet College (University of London) who were going to see next week but have been told to expect around £3000 per leg for an operation, which we will need to do soon. The operation will be for her Luxating Patella's and we will have to wait a year to then go and see what needs to be done with her hips or if surgery is even needed at that time.

    The insurance will not cover the costs and we are left with a potential £6000 bill. I have managed to just get a 2nd job 2 days a week and have emptied out my bank account, so far only have around £2000. Unfortunately, the vets dont offer a payment plan either.

    Has anyone had similar issues with their dog? Shes currently on anti-inflammatory pain killers and we have reduced her food so she loses a bit of weight, limited walks and even bought her a swimming pool (havent used it yet).

    Thank you so much

    [​IMG]
     
  2. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    LP itself isn't a surgery that's uncommon. A lot of vets do this orthopaedic surgery in-house rather than going to a orthopaedic surgeons. It might be something to consider and worth asking other veterinary practices in your area. It will definitely be a lot cheaper than a referral place.

    Have a look at adding a joint supplement yumove and joint sure are always recommended here, joint sure is cheaper though. They do help.
     
  3. Baby_Lola

    Baby_Lola PetForums Junior

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    Hia
    Thank you for the advice, I'll look in to it. They told me because shes such a small dog she would be best to get referred to a specialist to cut down on the risk of having to come back for multiple surgeries should the first one not go as planned.

    I have also purchased yumove, she has been taking it for 2 weeks now and I also got some CBD oil from SimplyCBD which I give 1 drop a day of
     
  4. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    The thing is it's small dogs that tend to suffer with LP. It wasn't long ago you would watch Crufts and most of the Toy breeds were hopping along, Yorkies were notorious. So it's toy breeds that the surgeries are carried on in the majority of the time.
     
  5. Baby_Lola

    Baby_Lola PetForums Junior

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    Interesting, never thought of it thst way.

    My mum is unemployed and so gets help from the Bluecross, the dog is registered with them and they then referred us to RVC.

    The only thing with the Bluecross is they said they won't operate unless we agree to get her spayed and this is definately not an option right now.
     
  6. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    It's really important that a dog with these health problems isn't bred from. I can only emphasise this. It's heartbreaking that a dog so young hasn't the quality of life but to have LP that severe. That could have been easily prevented if only her parents were health tested.
    To have HD in a dog so small, isn't common at all. Most common in larger breed dogs. It's a very painful condition especially for dogs which are so lively. Again, part genetic, part nature. No one really can say, but with bad LP, that probably has not helped.
     
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  7. Baby_Lola

    Baby_Lola PetForums Junior

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    No were not planning to breed her, it's more to avoid future health issues. Our other chi is intact and been extremely healthy her while life, she 8 now.

    With regards to her condition, what would your advice be as to what to do for her? I dont want to let money be a reason to give up on her and put her down. We're willing to do what it takes to give her a good life.
     
  8. Ochre

    Ochre PetForums Junior

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    So the Blue Cross will operate (at a massively reduced cost to you), if you agree to spay her at the same time? But you wont go down this route because you don't want to spay her. The only alternative being if you cant raise the funds for the operation through the referral clinic, you are considering putting her to sleep?

    If the above is correct (and I haven't got confused), then I'm afraid I would have absolutely no hesitation but have her spayed and be very very glad for the Blue Cross to do all of the surgery needed to take your girl out of pain and end your money worries. Surely it is better to have her spayed than putting her to sleep because you cant finance the surgery she needs?
     
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  9. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    I honestly would spay a healthy bitch than risk pyometra. The signs can be so subtle easily missed and can loose a dog over night if symptoms begin when you are sleep.
    Am not trying to scaremonger or anything but I lost a healthy bitch suddenly. No I didn't do a post mortem but we got a best guess from the vet. However the first question they always ask if you loose a bitch suddenly, is were they spayed because that's the most likely cause. Of course without a post mortem you wouldn't know. They suggest heart attack or brain anuerysm with my bitch. But pyometra would be the most likely diagnosis I am guessing otherwise. Of course they asked several questions but my dog had acted completely normal the day before.
     
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  10. Baby_Lola

    Baby_Lola PetForums Junior

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    Oh no sorry I didnt explain properly. Putting her down isnt an option at all, Im just thinking worst case scenario if she ends up with no legs or something worse.

    We will get the operation either way, either I raise the money and we take her to a specialist, or we take her to the BlueCross. The only thing that worried me about going to the BC was that the vet there herself recommended we go to a specialist, if they dont feel confident in doing the operation its something else to have to worry about. Is it worth paying the money to go to a specialist or should I maybe look for a better vet that may charge less?
     
  11. Baby_Lola

    Baby_Lola PetForums Junior

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    Im sorry to hear about your girl. We would consider spaying if they offered to do the less invasive way, I cant recall the names but there are 2 ways of spaying a bitch and one tends to be safer because the organs are kept intact
     
  12. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    Spaying is a very safe procedure that is done so often that vets can practically do it with their eyes closed. What isn’t safe is pyrometra which can kill your intact bitch before you even know what’s going on. Are you really prepared to take that risk with your bitch’s life for no real reason?
     
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  13. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    You mention the less invasive way keyhole surgery. The 3 holes just to take away the ovaries, makes the same scar as a one traditional spay.

    As it's a new technique I think you would struggle to find a vet who performed the procedure on a toy breed, or they are few and far between

    The evidence isn't there yet to say what complications can arise. However, in human medicine key hole surgery to remove the ovaries it's called BSO. It has a greater risk of ovary remnant syndrome, which all though rare you don't want this to occur. As that means your bitch is still at risk of pyometra.
     
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  14. MontyMaude

    MontyMaude PetForums VIP

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    My dogs has had both his knees operated on, my own vet has an orthopaedic surgeon that consults at their practise and I paid around £2000 per knee, I would also get your bitch spayed and your older bitch too, we nearly lost my childhood dog to a Pyo, she was so poorly and nearly didn't make it.

    Keyhole spaying is considerably more cost wise than a traditional spay and most vets don't perform it so you would have to find one that specialises in it.
     
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