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Helping an overweight GSD with behavioral issues?

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Loki PJ, Jun 10, 2019.


  1. Loki PJ

    Loki PJ PetForums Newbie

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    - 5 y/0 overweight, undersocialised shepherd is looking like she's headed for a poor life of bad joints and health issues and an unenjoyable daily life
    - how can I, a neighbour who has frequently walked her since a pup, help?
    - Is it possible to help her lose weight without being in complete control over her diet and regular lifestyle? if so, what would this require?
    - Any tips in helping with her behaviour, and particular exercises or general tips to help her lose weight the best?
    - How would you recommend I approach her owners to try and work with them to reduce how much she eats and increase her activity, and help her improve her social interactions so that she can enjoy her day-to-day life more?
    Thanks so much for your help!
     
    #1 Loki PJ, Jun 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019
  2. niamh123

    niamh123 PetForums VIP

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    Well done to you for taking such a large interest in this gorgeous girl:)
    I am sure someone will be along shortly to give you some advice
     
  3. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Sorry I haven't read this all through very long post however I would like to comment on the dog behaviour and socialisation.

    The owners were doing exactly the right thing, short lead and muzzle if the dog was being unpredictable doesn't react well in situations which have been overbearing.

    I really can't for the life of me think that letting her off lead to greet unknown dogs will be helping her at all. In fact this could be making her behaviour worse.
     
    mrs phas and picaresque like this.
  4. Loki PJ

    Loki PJ PetForums Newbie

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    thanks
     
    #4 Loki PJ, Jun 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019
  5. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    She doesn't need to relate to other dogs per se...

    I think you have watched too many dated TV programmes.

    Barking, lunging on a lead isn't necessary just due to owners nervousness..yes being nervous can be conveyed in some respect but that's a mighty extreme reaction. It might be she is just a frustrated greeter...which is why she behaves the way she does...however any arousal could escalate.
     
  6. Loki PJ

    Loki PJ PetForums Newbie

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    To be honest... I don't even watch TV, haha! I just eventually realised that me being nervous made her more agitated. You're right that it's important to be careful, warning snaps can turn bad. It's also true that she calms down a lot after she's had a bit of walking, which implies her excess energy and frustration of being kept alone all day also has a role to play...
    It's not an immediate reaction to her owner's nervousness, but a habit that's built up over time. It's not immediately solved just by them chilling out, of course.
     
  7. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    That's good - as i doubt they would be too chuffed at your having posted pictures of their dog, describing the lack of exercise and weight issue on a public forum!

    If they know you are asking on a forum for help though, surely they are on board with what you are trying to do? In which case, can you not work together to fix the weight issue at least?
     
    lullabydream and JoanneF like this.
  8. Loki PJ

    Loki PJ PetForums Newbie

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    Any better ideas?
     
    #8 Loki PJ, Jun 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019
  9. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    When you talk to them about her weight, what do they say?
    If they agree she needs to lose weight and seem willing to do something about it, maybe offer to make her your own little project and get the ball rolling that way?
     
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  10. Loki PJ

    Loki PJ PetForums Newbie

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    I think I might offer to go on a walk with one of them one day.
     
    #10 Loki PJ, Jun 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019
  11. Loki PJ

    Loki PJ PetForums Newbie

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    Although, through all of this I'm realising that I need to up my communication with them and stop being so up my arse behind their back. So thanks :)
     
  12. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    No. Sorry. That was my best one.
     
  13. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    Some of the art of dealing with the owners of ‘problem ‘ dogs is to take on board what they are capable of, and run with that.

    There’s no point giving them something to do, even if its the best for their dog, if they’re incapable/unable/unwilling to do it.

    Sometimes compromise is the best that can be done.
     
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