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Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by Lucky87, Jun 29, 2018.


  1. Lucky87

    Lucky87 PetForums Newbie

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    I posted on here a couple of times explaining that my kitten is very aggresive. I bought every toy, played with him all that jazz and nothing worked. I then got him neutered hoping that would calm him down. That was 6 weeks ago and his behaviour is even worse. This morning he went for me and bit my face, causing me to bleed on my chin. All he was doing was lying on my chest purring and then suddenly swiped at me, he has tried it before but he got me this time. He's around 5-6 months old now and I really don't know what to do anymore. The vet told me to perhaps phone a cat only clinic for advice but I'm not even sure that will do any good. He is a house cat, maybe he doesn't want to be? At my wits end I can't cope with that especially biting my face. If I don't let him in my bed at night he cries all night.
     

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  2. Summercat

    Summercat PetForums VIP

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    @Lucky87

    There is a poster @chillminx who is good with behavioral issues. Hopefully she will see your post.

    I am not sure but know some cats can get overstimulated and then strike out. Does he swish his tail back and forth before the swipes or nips?
     
  3. Lucky87

    Lucky87 PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks Sometimes but not always its mostly just out the blue
     
  4. Summercat

    Summercat PetForums VIP

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    @Lucky87
    Hi,
    Sorry, I have not delt with this situation myself but hopefully someone who has can help. I would keep my open for signs he is becoming over stimulated.
    This may help:
     
    chillminx and Lucky87 like this.
  5. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @Lucky87 - the Jackson Galaxy clip posted by Summercat is a good one. :)

    With a kitten who has a tendency to swipe at you unpredictably, I would not allow him near your face. So I wouldn't take the risk of having your kitty lying on your chest, as it may be just too much temptation for him having your face so close. Keeping him away from your face helps him learn that your face is 'out of bounds'.

    The same thing applies to picking him up - I wouldn't do it at all (other than to put him in a carrier for a vet trip) as it brings him on a level with your face.

    From your description it sounds like he is not actually biting you, but is scratching your face with his sharp incisor teeth and breaking the skin. With his litter mates it was OK for him to be a bit rough in his play as they had fur coats to protect their skin.

    An actual cat bite is a puncture wound, a nasty injury which gets infected with bacteria from the cat's teeth and requires antibiotic therapy. Puncture wounds don't bleed, (like your scratch did) and often the site of a puncture wound on a human swells up like a balloon. :( (I have been bitten a couple of times in the past when trying to handle frightened cats in an emergency situation. As have a number of us who help run Cat Rescues).

    The problem seems to be your kitten is still regarding you as another cat, a playmate whom he can rough and tumble with. He does need to have boundaries constantly reinforced so that he can learn you are not another cat. So please continue with the arms length play sessions - the wands, the Da Bird rod toys, the ping pong balls, scrunched up baking foil etc. as you have been doing.

    If he gets over excited and goes for your hand or arm etc, do not shout "NO" at him, instead squeal loudly, and keep still until he lets go. Then walk away from him, so he gets the message the game is over for now. Do not pick him up and remove him from the room, as this action could encourage more aggression from him.

    He would be better having his own room at night as this is another way of establishing boundaries between cat and human companion. I would not just shut him out of your room because then he is going to feel rejected and cry all night. Instead you need a room (not a bathroom) where you can settle him at night and close the door and then close your own bedroom door.

    You need to establish a regular reassuring bed time routine for him, he is still plenty young enough to adapt, and cats are very adaptable creatures anyway. So, after a vigorous play session before bed, start preparing the room where he is to sleep every night from now on. He will need his water, litter trays, a cosy bed up off the floor, and some quiet toys. Fit blackout blinds or blackout curtains at the window. Leave a radio on all night on a classical music station, playing quite low.

    Then feed him a tasty wet food supper, and sit with him quietly, ignoring him while he eats, grooms and settles for sleep. Then, saying nothing to him, quietly leave the room and turn off the light. Go to your bedroom and close the door.

    You will need to persevere with this. Do not give in and go to him if he cries at first. If you think he is too upset to be alone, then spend the first few nights sleeping with him in his room (e.g. you in a sleeping bag on the floor, or sofa if necessary :)), so as to acclimatise him to the idea this is the room where he sleeps.

    Once you have got him used to sleeping on his own, do not go back to allowing him in your room at night, or you will be back to square one.

    This system does work, I promise, as long as you are consistent.
     
  6. leashedForLife

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    .

    I'd get some toys that require interaction, but which also provide DISTANCE from me / my hands - such as a fishing-pole toy that he can chase, pounce on, or if it's large enuf, he can grab it & kick it to death.

    I'd also teach him to play fetch - if U have steps in the house, that's dead-easy. Toss a small, light toy that's easy for a cat to tote, down the steps. Cat chases... & if U are lucky, carries it back up. If not, go down, pick up the toy, & bring it back. Dangle or toss it hand to hand, get Kitty interested, & throw it downstairs AGAIN... & again, & again, & again...
    until Kitty brings it back. :) . Eventually, he will.

    some good fetch toys for kitties:
    - a rolled-up tinfoil ball of CLEAN un-used aluminum foil, too large to swallow
    - a flat toy with a thin krinkle Mylar lining, so when Kitty picks it up or bats it, it makes fun noises
    - a folded Mylar ball, or an open webwork ball of plastic
    - a felt or fabric small toy such as a mouse, WITHOUT a tail [just in case Kitty swallows string].
    - a folded-paper "bird" AKA airplane, which can fly when flung
    - a clean, un-used Q-tip
    - a new tampon, preferably cotton, paper-wrapped in a pasteboard tube [don't leave tampons with Kitty unsupervised - till U know it's safe.
    Some cats eat string. Never EVER pull on anything protruding from a bodily orifice - vet emergency, requires immediate attn, day or night.].


    Q - does he ambush U?
    hide behind doors & leap out to bite or scratch, then bolt away? -- Hide beneath the sofa, or under a dining-chair with a skirt, & rip at yer ankles?

    - terry

    .
     
    Lucky87 and moggie14 like this.
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