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Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Mattypecka, Jan 31, 2014.


  1. Mattypecka

    Mattypecka PetForums Newbie

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    Hi all,

    I am new to the forum so go easy on me! We have recently welcomed Chief to our family. He is a working cocker. Like any spaniel he is already full of life. He is 11 weeks old. He has what the breeder called 'thick elbows'. Is anybody familiar with this?

    His elbow joints seem a lot larger than the bones on the rest of his legs. His feet are also at 11.05. He is in no pain what so ever and was just as quick as the rest of the litter. I know it sounds brutal but I have firmly squeezed all of his spine and front and rear leg bones and do so on a regular basis after exercise. Not at any point has he even batted an eyelid.

    I know spaniels can have problems with their legs and wondered if anybody has come across or dealt with this in the past. He is due his vet check and jabs in a couple of days and would like to prepare myself for what news I could get.

    Many thanks in advance

    Matt
     
  2. rona

    rona Still missing my boys

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    Any photos?
     
  3. Mattypecka

    Mattypecka PetForums Newbie

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    Hi. I believe I have attached an image. Not the best photos I am afraid. He is a pup and catching him still is not too easy.

    Any comments welcome
     

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  4. Mattypecka

    Mattypecka PetForums Newbie

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    Here is another
     
  5. rona

    rona Still missing my boys

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    He's got huge bone structure there to grow into and maybe slightly Queen Anne legs
     
  6. Mattypecka

    Mattypecka PetForums Newbie

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    Here is another. A little better
     

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  7. Mattypecka

    Mattypecka PetForums Newbie

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    Do you think there may be any thing to worry about?
     
  8. rona

    rona Still missing my boys

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    Difficult to say until he's grown a bit. Many dogs live long lives on Queen Anne legs, but if it's his elbows causing the problem............

    I hope it's just he's very bigged boned and needs to grow into them.

    Good luck at the vets. Let us know how you get on
     
  9. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Only a vet can really tell you if there is a problem unfortuanately.
    The elbow is a pretty complex joint as it consists of three bones, which should fit perfectly and move in a certain way to articulate the elbow joint. There is cartilage in the elbow too, and it is possible to get developemental problems in the bones of the elbow or cartilidge.
    Below the elbow you have the two long bones the radius and ulna. The Elbow then connects these two long bones to the upper leg, and below the radius and ulna you have smaller bones tendons and ligaments that make up the wrist. All these bones are growing and developing. The radius does a lot of the weight baring for the leg too. So any problems in the development of any of these bones can cause problems. Its possible that he may not have any pain, sometimes you cant get a pain response until a vet does a proper orthopaedic exam, manipulating and extending the joints to see if there is any pain reponse and how the joints move.

    It could well be OK but the sooner you can get a vet to examine him and evaluate if there is a problem or not the better. Sometimes (if there is a problem and depending on what it is) if there should be you can sometimes do things to rectify it with early intervention.

    As said no one on here can really tell you if there is a problem or not only a vet can do that.
     
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