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Help with none weight gaining pup.

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by Kirsty Martini, Aug 13, 2019.


  1. Kirsty Martini

    Kirsty Martini PetForums Newbie

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    Hi all, this is my first post so just looking for advice with someone with a little experience with same issue.

    I have a new litter of mini dachshunds, 5 in total born on Sunday, All are gaining well, between 170-190g at birth, I am weighing them every 12 hours and each interval all but one pups are gaining about 20g

    I have one pup that is only gaining 2/3g at each interval, in 24 hours he has only gained 5g.

    I have tried to put the stronger pups on the teats to get the milk flowing and then swapping over so he can get the good milk with minimal effort.

    I have tried to separate mum and this pup but as they are still so small and new it is causing her stress to be away so know this could affect her milk supply.

    I am open to supliment feeding the smaller pup but just wondered if anyone had any advice, or recommendations on formula etc.

    I have been to the vets with mum and pups today and they didn't seem concerned and she just said so long as he is gaining I needn't worry, I am just concerned because she didn't seem at all interested in the pups and only really weighed mum and checked her teats.

    Thanks in advance

    Kirsty
     
  2. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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  3. Kirsty Martini

    Kirsty Martini PetForums Newbie

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  4. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    Firstly it is quite natural for puppies to be different sizes and grow at different speeds. Whilst i appreciate the necessity to understand whether they are putting on weight I actually think you may be adding stress to the situation by checking their weight so regularly, though. Instead of weighing I tend to watch carefully ; Is this pup feeding? Does the pup fall asleep after feeding? Is the pup being pushed out or falling off the teat? Is the pup becoming weaker? Is mum caring equally for this pup (washing/licking)? All these pointers let me know where I may need to step in to help.

    By my calculation your puppies are only three/four days old so mum won't want you to take her away or interrupt her feeding routines. Presuming that your Vet checked each pup for cleft palate (generally they just pop their finger in the mouth) then this pup may just be a slow drinker. With slow drinkers I tend to ensure they feed from mum very regularly by sitting beside and holding them to a teat (or tucking them in with a towel) so I know the milk is going in.

    I don't tend to supplement feed unless I think mum can't provide or the pup has been rejected. With such a small breed and at only a few days old supplement feeding would be quite tricky as the pup may inhale or you feed too fast and they aspirate (and this is often fatal).

    I would persevere with mum feeding personally and see how the pup progresses. As the Vet says, if pup is gaining weight then all should be ok. Fingers crossed.

    J
     
  5. Kirsty Martini

    Kirsty Martini PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for your reply James. I've been weighing them when I get the opportunity, when mum goes out to toilet for example rather than taking them from her, but I will try to leave them and make the observations you recommended. The pup does feed, however he makes a different noise to the others when feeding, almost as though he doesn't have a good latch. The vet did check them for cleft palate so that's not the issue. He is generally sleepy, the vet mentioned he was lethargic and he doesn't feed for as long as the others. Will try to take a step back, obviously just don't want him to fade out. Mum is caring for him equally as the rest, he's not being bullied off the teat, although he only feeds for a couple minutes as mentioned so I'm not sure the good hind milk will have let down by the time he has gotten bored or fallen asleep
     
  6. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    I'm not suggesting you leave him to fade. If he is poorly or is suffering from fading puppy syndrome then there isn't a lot we can do unfortunately. But as I said many puppies are just small or slower to feed. I don't like that he is lethargic though. Just keep holding him on to drink and see how it goes. And if in a few days he is still low energy then try the top up feeding. Maybe others will have different suggestions :)

    J
     
    niamh123 and lullabydream like this.
  7. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    James has given good advice. I think constant weighing is a bit much. You could weigh every couple of days to keep an eye on their weight if you do not have a good eye for it. Lethargic is not good but there is not much more you can do. Sadly some pups are not destined to make it. just make sure the pup is feeding regularly and the mother is not kicking it out.
     
  8. Darth

    Darth PetForums Member

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    Hope your puppy is now doing ok.....I’ve had puppies that are a bit slower than the rest of the litter.....put him on a back teat every time you pass the whelping box and only weigh once a day at the most is the only advice I would give.

    I wouldn’t give any supplement milk, or separate it from mum.....both can cause other issues.
     
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