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Help with letting out rabbits that aren’t neutered/spayed

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by Cherlae, Apr 8, 2021.


  1. Cherlae

    Cherlae PetForums Newbie

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    My two rabbits, Shonen and Gum Gum are turning 5 months on the 17th of April. They are due to get neutered and spayed, hopefully on the 26th April. As soon as they turned 4 months, I took them to the vet for their consultation but the surgery couldn’t be done because Shonen’s testicles hadn’t dropped yet. From when they were babies, I used to let them out to play in my bedroom (that’s where their cage is located) and they love it! However, ever since Shonen started peeing on my walls, bed and even wardrobe, I don’t let them out as much (I think puberty?). I feel sooo bad, because they look at me with their big eyes and want to come out, but what can I do so they don’t pee everywhere, whilst making them happy? Their cage is 128x128cm but the vet said it wasn’t big enough, I don’t have enough space to make their cage bigger, that’s why the aim at the end of the day is to free roam them once they are fixed.
    Any suggestions guys? Thank you!
     
  2. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums VIP

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    Are they kept separated as they're not neutered yet? Gum Gum is capable of getting pregnant from 5 months old, and they can breed through bars so need to kept at least several feet from one another. Shonen being near a girl while his hormones are going nuts is going to make him spray even more. Unneutered boys can honestly be disgusting haha!

    Is there another room like a bathroom (a bit more wipe-clean) that they can have playtimes in for the time being?

    Bedrooms are definitely not ideal for rabbits, they are very active at dawn, dusk and during the night, nocturnal activities can easily keep us awake.
     
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  3. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    You may have to seriously rethink having them as house rabbits if you have such limited space. That sized cage is really best kept as a toilet/hay bar, its simply not suitable for full time living.

    Have a read here for housing requirements: https://rabbit.org/faq-housing/

    You could perhaps use puppy pen panels, and maybe drape towels/sheets down them to catch the pee.
     
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  4. Cherlae

    Cherlae PetForums Newbie

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    Actually they aren’t separated, maybe that’s another reason why! The vet told me that they will be fine until they are 6 months, but it’s good to get another opinion.

    My bathroom is so tiny, it’s basically the same size as their cage.

    They are actually alright at night, when they see me turn the light off and get into bed, they are very quiet. It’s only recently I haven’t been sleeping much because they want to come out.
     
  5. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums VIP

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    Yikes, is that vet bunny savvy? Even without his plums fully dropped, he will be becoming sexually mature and many small-medium sized rabbit breeds can get pregnant from as young as 4 months old. This is why rescues are full of accidental litters :(

    I would separate them ASAP.
     
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  6. Corneal

    Corneal Shelly

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    What is a vet that isn’t rabbit savy like? Coz when I google “rabbit vets” it just shows ALL vets
     
  7. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums VIP

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    Good rabbit vets are exotics specialists. There's very little training on rabbit vet care in the regular veterinary and vet nurse courses, they have to take extra exotics courses and continue with further training once qualified to stay up to date.

    There's recommended vet lists here but it's not exhaustive:
    https://rabbitwelfare.co.uk/rabbit-...abbit-friendly-vets/rabbit-friendly-vet-list/
     
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  8. Corneal

    Corneal Shelly

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    this is my vets, would you say they're rabbit savy?

    http://arthurlodgevet.co.uk/
     
  9. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums VIP

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    They mention exotics but nothing in great detail. It would be impossible to say without having an actual chat to their vets and vet nurses.
     
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  10. DoricBun

    DoricBun PetForums Newbie

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    128cm x 128cm is definitely too small, rabbits will get bored and unhappy with such a small space and no enrichment. I started with a cage, but quickly learnt that min size for a rabbit enclosure is much larger, at least 300cm x 200cm. Rabbits need lots of space to run, jump, and exercise. Can you not make a bigger enclosure in another part of your home?

    For free roam there has to be a certain amount of rabbit proofing in place for things you don't want chewed, clawed, or destroyed and as well for the rabbits safety when unsupervised, rabbits seem to love to chew things like electric cables, phone cables, or any cables!
     
    Tiggers likes this.
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