Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Help with house training please

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by claire, Nov 2, 2007.


  1. claire

    claire Guest

    Cassie is 5 months old akita puppy and has been easy enough to house train we haven't had any accidents for ages but when people come round who she doesn't know well or has not seen before she wees on greeting them. My partner and i did not think was too much of a problem and that she would grow out of it but my mother seems to think that if its not stopped she will always do it. Shouting at her just upsets her and causes her to do it more so i just send her outside any advice would be great thanks
     
  2. cadavell

    cadavell PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    my border collie sky use to do that when she was younger, she was a nervous puppy especially around strangers. she is 7 months now and not as nervous and the problem seems to have disappeared.
     
  3. Jenny Olley

    Jenny Olley PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    1,963
    Likes Received:
    448
    Hi claire
    It can be a problem in young bitch pups, shes probably a little worried about meeting new people, having a wee is just a form of submission, saying i'm inoffensive. It may help to let your visitors in while Cassie is in another room, get them seated, then let her in. they are less of a threat when sat down, then get them to give her treats, making her think visitors are good to have around rather than a threat.
    Jen
     
  4. growler1961

    growler1961 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    1
    she is just a little scared & excited all at the same time, my pup grew out of it but was a bit un pleasent when she did it in a pet shop !!she is just a shy pup dont worry try to socialise her as much as you can to as many different situations as poss ,at eight months they go through a fear period pay special attention to her at this time never make a big deal of it ! she will grow out of it with a bit of tlc
     
  5. Hameldal

    Hameldal PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Please dont shout at her shes only a baby and doesnt know any better :p
    Think of her as a todler whos potty training ... with the best will in the world they forget, get excited have an accident once in a while ! :)
    If you know someones coming give her the chance to go out first.
    If she does have an accident take her straight out as quickly as poss and let her finish.
    Watch for signs she wants to go, and try get her in a routine of when she goes will help too.
    Good luck
    Jules xxx
     
  6. claire

    claire Guest

    thanks for the advice. i must say tho that i disagree about not shouting at her all together, i would never shout at her 4 an accident or hit her but i thought raising your voice let them know they were doing wrong! even as babies i thought it was important to let them know right from wrong. If you dont raise your voice to a puppy to let them know they have done wrong how do you do it?
     
  7. claire

    claire Guest

    but we have had visitors tonite i left her in the kitchen then let her in when everyone was sat down and this worked very well thanks very much, its reasurring to know she will more than likely grow out of it
     
  8. dh.dti

    dh.dti Guest

    I would'nt get too worried over it, all dogs do it & the majority grow out of it.

    As already said its excitement that she cannot control, i'm pretty sure she will learn to in time.

    I would just try not to let any one make a fuss when they first enter & be patient.

    All my Akita's have behaved this way & then grown out of it.

    hth
     
  9. Red-River

    Red-River Guest

    The emphasis on teaching a puppy right from wrong is to praise them for good behaviour and ignore the bad behaviour. If your puppy is doing something wrong then try and distract them with something else and then praise them for doing the right thing. Shouting at pups can make them nervous. There are only two words that I say in a "firm" voice, NO and LEAVE.
    I never ever shout at a pup.
     
  10. dh.dti

    dh.dti Guest

    Good post "I agree"
    :)
     
  11. cartwright

    cartwright PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'd like to know how that works within a dog pack... Do dogs never growl at each other? Proportionate response is what dogs seem to use with each other - if the gentle threat of a warning growl is ignored, it is followed up more loudly and with matching body language.
     
  12. claire

    claire Guest

    i do mostly only raise my voice for no or leave but i do think there are other situations that call for me to be little strict, like when we go out if i call her back and she ignores me then i do it louder and she often obeys i think it let her know i mean it, not that i really have many reasons to tell her off she is quite good, do seem to be having a same problem with her pinching my daughters toys she has her own and does know whats hers and whats not because when she take one she shouldnt she hide up the yard
     
  13. Jenny Olley

    Jenny Olley PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    1,963
    Likes Received:
    448
    Glad you had success with getting your visitors seated before letting cassie in, continue to do this until confidence builds and she learn you can greet people without a wee.

    Jen
     
  14. Nina

    Nina PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    4,921
    Likes Received:
    229
    Claire, there can be several reasons why Cassie is urinating when seeing strangers, and I would always advise that you first check that there is no medical reason for her doing this.

    It could be that your relationship with Cassie may need restructuring. For example, when a stranger walks into the room they should try ignoring Cassie until she has calmed down, then a soft approach without her becoming too excited. Once she is settled you can stroke her gently and hopefully, this will illiminate the problem.
     
  15. Jenny Olley

    Jenny Olley PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    1,963
    Likes Received:
    448
    I agree with Nina that with a onset of urination problems it is important to get it checked out at the vets, however as the pup did not wee yesterday when the visitors were seated so of less threat, its unlikely to be a medical problem.
     
  16. claire

    claire Guest

    i dont think its medical probelm as she only does it to strangers but she is due for her 6 months check up in the next few weeks so i will ask than anyway, but when i have mentioned it before at the vets they seem very unconcerned. I just think that maybe she will grow out of it
     
  17. DiamondDust

    DiamondDust PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2007
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Claire, my Nan had the same problem with her GSD but she would do it from excitement she found that she could never stop it and before we could go in the house she had to come out side to greet us then she would be ok, i do agree that bringing people in and sitting them down while she is out of the room is a good idea, x
     
  18. shelterhelp73

    shelterhelp73 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    :)The genetically shy dog is a super submissive type and unlike many dogs are quite sensitive to any forms of "dominant" behavior in humans. Even ordinarily submissive dogs can become extremely submissive if its owner misunderstands and unintentionally forces it to increase its submissiveness.

    First, tone down your aggressive behavior -- with a submissive dog there is no real need to consciously dominate it. Examples of dominating behavior include:

    Direct eye contact
    Standing over the dog
    Walking towards the dog while looking at it

    Tips:
    Wait when you come home. Say "hi" and be verbally friendly, but don't touch or pet it for about 5-15 minutes. Try not to make the moment more exciting than it already is.
    When you greet it, get down on its level. Rather than standing and bending at the waist, bend at the knees (or sit) so that your face is about level with his and you are not looking down on him. This is a less dominant position, and less likely to trigger a submissive posture.
    Don't pet it on the head. Rather, tell it to sit, maybe "shake hands", then scratch it under the chin and on the chest. This is less dominating than the pat on the head (because you avoid standing over it).
    When you correct this type of dog, do so with your voice only (avoid direct eye contact). If it starts to urinate, then say immediately, "OK, let's go out!" in a happy tone of voice -- and take it out. Or, take a toy out (something it likes to do) and play with it. What you are doing here is telling your dog, "OK, I see your submissiveness. That's good."
    When guests come over, ask them to ignore your dog and not look at it even if it comes up and sniffs them. After a bit, when people are sitting down then have them gently put their hands out and talk to your dog, without looking at it. Usually after about 15 minutes or so everything is fine.
    In general, show signs of low-key approval immediately when the dog becomes submissive. Then distract it with something else. When you ignore submissiveness or get mad at it, you're in effect telling the dog "You're not submissive enough!" so the poor thing intensifies its efforts -- and submissive urination is about as submissive as it gets.
    Be really positive with your dog, this type lacks self-confidence and will look to you quite often to make sure everything is OK.

    One technique that helps many dogs with this problem is called "Flooding." You need a group of people, preferably ones who will stimulate the undesired response (in this case, peeing). You find the least intimidating step for your dog (the point at which she does not submissively urinate), and work on each step until she's comfortable with each. If she urinates, you've gone too fast and you should back up a step until she's more confident. This process will take a while.

    Have your dog sit with you on leash (preferably not on carpeting!)
    Have the group of people walk past your dog without looking at her; when they can do this without her peeing, move on to next step (this is true of all steps)
    Next have the people look/smile at her when they walk past
    Next have the people say something to her ("Hi puppy") as they walk past
    Next have the people give her a treat as they walk past
    Next have the people touch her (ex. pat on the head) as they walk past
    Next, repeat the previous 5 steps but with the people stopping instead of walking past (ie, stop but don't look, stop and look, stop and say hi,...)
    Actually, this technique can be used for all kinds of other responses: a dog that jumps on people, barks at them, etc
    I hope this will help you out. There is also a link to a training website that has free videos you can watch just register (for free) and watch the videos.
    DOGstar productions | home
    Best of Luck

    Rachel
     
  19. Nina

    Nina PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    4,921
    Likes Received:
    229
    Positive reinforcement is the best form of training. By offering a dog a reward (this can be a treat or praise), for good behaviour they will undoubtedly repeat that performance again.

    Let me ask you a question. If you were constantly helping someone, or working for no money, would you want to continue? It is the same with dogs.

    Training methods have changed over the years and continue to change. Some trainers do not advocate feeding treats as rewards, while others will allow it. Teaching a dog to heel may be performed in numerous ways, and what works for one dog, may not work for another, so it is up to the owner to find the correct way for YOUR dog.

    Toilet training is now helped by crate training and while some people may see crates as awful, cage like things, used well, they provide a wonderful space/den for your puppy/dog to go for their 'ME' time. Leave the crate door open and your dog will frequent it often during the day to retreat from the everyday hustle and bustle of life.

    Shouting or punishing a dog will see little or no improvement in their behaviour. In no way is it the opposite of a reward and may indeed spark an aggressive response. It is far better to work on a positive response, rather than making your dog fearful and therefore slower to learn.
     
  20. claire

    claire Guest

    Thanks everyone for your advice, the problem is now solved and cassie is alot better with strangers, ignoring her works well except of one vistor who cassie has taken exception to and just pees at the sight of her but she isnt a regular visitor. Would just be nice now to get her to stop licking all the time you cant fuss her with out her licking all the time, any ideas?
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice