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Help with goldfish please !

Discussion in 'Fish Keeping Chat' started by Scott2Rescue, Jul 28, 2020.


  1. Scott2Rescue

    Scott2Rescue PetForums Newbie

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    Hey guys no idea if this is the right place for this.

    Sister has bought a black Moore goldfish, it seemed like it was doing great.

    A week or to ago it started developing these white marks and white pieces hanging off its scales.


    Now it seems like it has a large silver patch on its scales and white on its fins. Any ideas?

    It's spent a lot of time just swimming in place all day not as energetic as it was a week ago.
     

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  2. LinznMilly

    LinznMilly Moderator
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    Hi Scott. Welcome to the forum.

    The white patches hanging off the fish could be anything from excess slime coat (which is usually an invisible layer of mucus that covers the whole of the fish and acts as a barrier to pathogens. Excessive slime coat therefore would indicate the presence of a pathogen), to something more serious such as a bacterial infection.

    As for the silver patch on the fish's side:. At first glance, I thought it was just the scales themselves (and it still could be as the gene which causes the pigmentation in goldfish and Black Moors is recessive and therefore unstable), but I wonder if it's an injury?

    Could you post a pic of the whole tank, please? As well as answering as many of the following questions as you can;

    1) How big is the tank? (in litres, gallons, or physical dimensions length x width x height)
    We ask about tank size because the smaller the tank, the quicker things can go wrong. Knowing tank size or volume can also help us work out medication dosage, if necessary.

    2) How long has it been set up? Could you tell us the make and model of the filter?
    This is in two parts;
    A) Age of the set-up gives us a vague indication of how likely the tank is to be fully cycled. For example, if you've had the tank for 2 weeks and got fish a day after the tank, we know you're 2 weeks into a fish-in-tank cycle. Plus, the newer the tank, the more likely it is that it's a causative factor in the problems you're experiencing.
    B) Knowing the make and model of the filter can help us work out if it's appropriate for your tank and stocking.

    3) Did you cycle it before you added the fish? (Cycling involves adding a source of ammonia to the tank and testing daily until ammonia and nitrite return to 0ppm and you have a nitrate reading. This process takes weeks - not days. You can find a link with more information on cycling here).
    This is related to Q2.

    4) Do you have any test results for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, (in ppm or mg/l - "water parameters fine" doesn't tell us anything) pH, GH and KH? Also, details of the test kit you're using will be beneficial, too.
    Another question that has multiple parts.
    A). Water quality problems (ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate) are the single biggest causes of illness and death in the hobby. "Fine" is subjective, we need the actual results.
    B). PH, GH and KH, collectively known as water chemistry, affect the toxicity of any water quality issues. Plus, fish kept outside of the parameters they've evolved for are more susceptible to problems
    C). Dip strip tests are usually less reliable than the liquid tests, and you usually have to buy a separate kit for ammonia (which makes absolutely no sense to me, but then I don't work for a test kit manufacturer), so if, for example, your fish are showing all the signs of nitrite poisoning, but the kit says it's 0mg/l, we'll take that into account but advice you do a 50% water change anyway. :D

    5) Could you give us a full list of tank inhabitants, including species and numbers?
    It's important to know then full stocking of the tank for a number of reasons;
    A). To rule in or out the possibility of overstocking
    B). To ensure that any treatment we advise is safe for all species - for example, there's no point in advising a copper based treatment if you have inverts or sensitive fish in the tank, because it'll kill them.
    C). To rule in or out any compatibility issues.

    6) When was the last time you did a water change? How much, and did you use dechloronator?
    The day-to-day running of the tank doesn't change much, which makes water changes the most common variable in the hobby. It's the one part where we can screw up - forgetting the dechlorinator is just one part. Also forgetting to plug the filter back in, like I did, 5 weeks ago :Bag

    7) When was the last time you added anything new to the tank - fish, inverts, decor Did you quarantine them? If so, how long for? You can find more information on quarantine here

    Adding new fish (or any inverts or decor that was in a tank with fish) can come home sick. Fish shops and suppliers often keep diseases under control by using UV sterilisers, which can mean the fish have no immune system to speak of, which means as soon as they come off UV - like your home aquarium, for example, they have no defences against any and all diseases out there. Plus, any immunity they have gained is put to the test with the stress and shock of transport.

    If you put them straight into your main tank, any diseases they come with can quickly lead to a tank-wide problem.

    8) Could you post pics? Mainly of the fish in question, but also of the tank. Sometimes a member might spot something that you may have overlooked.

    9) Anything else you think we need to know? The emergency, the history, etc.
     
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  3. Scott2Rescue

    Scott2Rescue PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for the in depth reply.
    Unfortunately I can't answer many of these questions as it's not my tank or fish I'm merely feeding him for a few days.

    What I can say is the tank is about 20l
    Has a pump and there is just the single Blackmore goldfish inside, with a few plastic plants and a coupe pieces of décor.

    Very simple setup, I know that the tank has been cleaned out but that's about all I know. Sorry I couldn't be more helpful. Will upload some more pictures of the tank / fish in a min !
     
  4. Scott2Rescue

    Scott2Rescue PetForums Newbie

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    IMG_20200728_154143.jpg IMG_20200728_153748.jpg IMG_20200728_153755.jpg IMG_20200728_153813.jpg IMG_20200728_153855.jpg
     

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  5. magpie

    magpie PetForums VIP

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    Do you know roughly how long your sister has had the fish and the tank? Most problems with fish (especially in a new set up) are down to a issue with the water quality, and I think that's likely what is going on here too. Ideally you could do with having a test kit to test the water so you know for sure. In the meantime I would be doing regular, even daily, 50% water changes, making sure that the temperature of the new water matches the tank and that you use a dechlorinator.

    It may be possible to get the water quality under control in the short term, but in the long term the main issue is that the tank is just far too small for a goldfish.
    Some info here on the size goldfish can grow to and what they need to stay healthy: https://www.petforums.co.uk/threads/goldfish-basics.527255/

    I also think that @LinznMilly is right and that the silver patch on the side looks like an injury, so I would perhaps remove the decor as I think he's scraped his scales off on something.
     
    LinznMilly likes this.
  6. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums Senior

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    I agree that looks like an injury and removing the artificial decor would be the first task.

    Definitely get a proper water test kit, a liquid kit not strips. Goldfish are horrendously messy fish and poor water quality is notorious if they're in small tanks and small filters.

    This tank may look ok for now, but in reality it's way too small. Juvenile Goldies like him need more like 60-70 litres and then at least 150 litres as adults. Their filters need to be hefty, rated for double the volume of the tank but needs a spray bar as fancies don't cope so well in strong currents. Goldfish are big, messy monsters that should live at least 10-15 years.
     

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