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Help with a nipping pup

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Cloudy Star, Jun 13, 2009.


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  1. leashedForLife

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    pups and dogs do not IME of over-20 years as a trainer, need to be *dominated* -
    they need to be taught.
     
  2. leashedForLife

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    introduce a crate -
    Pet Forums Community - View Single Post - Calming Your Cerrrrrraaaaaazzzzzzzy Canine - new blog series
    preferably a SHIPPING -aka- Airline-Approved Crate - not the wire AKA show-crate.

    shipping-crates / airline-crates do not leak; they rattle much, much less; are not cold-metal when chill or hot-metal in sun,
    but moderate in temperature (especially in a climate-controlled house); they have SOLID bottoms (and preferably a run-off trough,
    so diarrhea, vomit, pee, water-spills, etc, have SOMEPLACE to go - away from the raised center-surface ;) ).

    best of all -
    Airline Crates are GREAT for travel + transport!

    safe, burst-strength tested, solid, they will not BEND, trapping the occupant, or FOLD, possibly puncturing the occupant -
    wire-crates can and have done both.

    show-crates are too-noisy, as they rattle every time the pup/dog breathes, let alone moves;
    too-permeable, as the pup can drag destructible or dangerous items inside, trash them or eat bits! ;
    too visually-open while physically constraining: Pup can see, but not DO; and an open-roof and 4 open-walls create insecurity: the pup is trapped in the open (which is very-bad for anxious pups).

    show-crates are great to show-off a dog outside the conformation-ring, in the shade;
    at home, IMO they are lousy for sleep or housetraining (the trays leak + splatter; they also rust or crack).
    they are also downright dangerous for transport.

    TETHERS -
    easy to install, inexpensive, simple to use; 18-inches between clips is plenty long-enuf for most dogs.
    Tethered to Success


    over-the-counter CALMATIVES and stress-lowering -
    for both humans and pups or dogs! :thumbup:
    Pet Forums Community - View Single Post - dog body-language - and why it matters so much...

    happy training,
    --- terry
     
  3. Nicky10

    Nicky10 PetForums VIP

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    I used the squeal and ignore thing. It worked on Buster who can now have your finger in his mouth have a gentle chew he seems to like it as like a soothing behaviour, no pain at all, and doesn't bite or nip. He learned very quickly but squealing/yelping doesn't work on a lot of terriers
     
  4. gigona

    gigona PetForums Newbie

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    My dog is currently in quarantine and goes mad when I go and see her jumping up, nipping etc. I was reading some of Cesar Millans books and read that walking in to where your dog maybe if the dog is projecting that excited behaviour ignore it, no eye contact, no speaking, no touching and if it nips do not move as you backing away makes them feel slighty dominant, wait till the dog is submissive maybe even sitting down then pet it.

    I did it worked in 2 go's!!!
     
  5. nicephotog

    nicephotog PetForums Junior

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    You thought that was normal....
    I recently put down a pup that will only require(must have) losing some trousers deliberately recently (cattle dog X Kelpie).
    He did that one totally instinctively "as he should" continually.
    Anyhow, all of them do that, so learn to keep a pair of long trousers (for a pup) for them to play on and ween them off that after you teach "no".
    For hand chewing, either get a bone or get some dog biscuit treats it can break with its puppy teeth(maybe snap them to smaller peices for it to eat and chew {not dog food pebbles}, "tasties" , let it hurt your hand anyhow with the chewing).
    "Ves(uvius") had some issues of his behavior traits that match an unsafe animal through my experience.

    http://www.youtube.com/nicephotog
     
    #107 nicephotog, Apr 25, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2010
  6. tashi

    tashi PetForums VIP

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    Think there is a little confusion on this thread with different lingo from different countries - I think when it was said to put down I dont think it was meant euthanize please can we get back on track and try as best as possible to put into 'plain english' what is meant.
     
  7. DogsAreTheBest

    DogsAreTheBest PetForums Newbie

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    :) Puppies chew to set their teeth, both the first set and the second set. Without chewing their teeth will not seat firmly as they should so mother nature provides that they instinctively chew for this to happen. Besides safe chew toys, untreated pine ( block of wood you can buy from your local hardware store cut into blocks ), ice cubes, knotted old socks and anything you can find that is not what you want to teach your puppy to leave alone. Chewing will continue until the second set of teeth are set and going forward for some time until your puppy "grows up". It is not uncommon for light chewing to persist to 1 year of age. "Mouthing" is a separate activity and generally persists until maturity as this is how they both learn and play.
     
  8. tripod

    tripod PetForums VIP

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    Any documentation to support that - the setting teeth thing? Only wondering as veterinary dentists are always panicking about puppies chewing anything anyway solid and playing with hard toys as the milk teeth can be moved and then the line provided by them for the adult teeth distorted. This is why we see retained teeth for example.

    Chewing causes the release of dopamine which helps with relaxing and chewing itself provides pain relief.

    There is lots of evidence to support the hypothesis that puppies have teeny pointy needley teeth is for learning bite inhibition.
     
  9. DogsAreTheBest

    DogsAreTheBest PetForums Newbie

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    Support for setting teeth - All of my veterinarians over the years have reinforced this theory although they were general practitioners as I have not had the need of a dental veterinarian. I can understand why a dental veterinarian would feel as he does. I have followed their philosophy and knowing that our original dogs chewed everything from petrified wood if they could find it to rocks, as puppies, and yet through the generations and decades we have dogs with beautiful teeth causes me to believe that they may be correct in this theory, if you will. I find that by allowing my dogs to chew their teeth stay clean also. I tried researching on the internet just now and while there are many articles discussing dogs chewing I could not find what I was looking for, so to answer the question at hand, it appears that verbal instruction is all that I can offer and the fact that at "my age" and decades of rearing dogs, it has worked for me. If I am able to find more information I will be happy to post.:)
     
  10. leashedForLife

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  11. tripod

    tripod PetForums VIP

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    Yeah but we don't have dogs with generations of perfect teeth ;) Due to selecitve breeding, processed feeding and hard chews we are seeing more and more and more problems with canine teeth. I do agree that dogs need to chew but they haven't been chewing petrified wood or stones to make them healthy. Wild canids don't live as long as domesticated dogs, they eat soft raw bone regularly and we haven't caused all sorts of funny stuff with selective breeding.
    Domestic dog teeth have more against them in relation to dental health and I don't believe the chewing of very hard things or even soft woods due to the risk of splintering (I have seen too many mouth abscesses). Appropriate chewing is certainly important.

    Would be very interested if you come across any data on this :)
     
  12. merlin39

    merlin39 PetForums Member

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    I'm so glad to hear other people are suffering with nipping! our 9 1/2 week cockerpoo pup is really quite persistant and we are worrying we are doing something wrong or he has aggressive tendancies. sometimes he plays really nice shows no possesion over toys or food etc but when he gets excited he goes to nip, we hold our hand flat as he cant get a grip then and say NO! or 'ah ah' which is the command we use for no or stop around the house. this rarely works in this situation and he seem to see it as a challange or game launching himself again and again at our hands, sometimes with barking and little growling for added measure. are we doing something wrong? when he gets like this we put him in his crate for a 5 min cool down and then he is normally fine! this is easy whilst he is small but when he gets bigger??
    i will add that he responds very well to us in other situations is very easy to train and has learn't lots of things like sit, down, roll over, paw and is well on the way to being toilet trained.
    i thnk we are overly worried as we had a rescue dog for a week before our pup who unfortunaly had to go back as he had been badley treated and showed quite a lot of aggression culminating in him biting me and going for my husband. think we are worried it's us and not the dogs now!!
    please help if you have any advice of even just reassurance!
    thansk
    merlin :confused1:
     
  13. leashedForLife

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    Ur pup is only 9-WO, hun -
    *mouthing* and *nipping* are very different, mouthing is gentle and curious or playful; nips -Hurt-.
    any well-reared pup should have decent bite inhibition (a soft mouth) when they leave dam + sibs, but the pup
    has to practice being apropos with their mouth, to make it habitual. ;)

    LINKS -

    DogStarDaily website -
    i strongly recommend downloading the 2 *free* pdf-file books to be found there -
    Free Downloads | Dog Star Daily
    the titles are Before U Get Ur Dog and After... .
    they cover socialization and bite-inhibition exceptionally well! :thumbsup:

    TETHERS -
    U can have an eye-bolt in every room, just move tether + pup; great for *instant* time-outs,
    easy to install, inexpensive, simple use; 18-inches between clips is plenty long-enuf.
    Tethered to Success

    fun4fido posted a helpful blog-link -
    Teaching Bite*Inhibition - blog - fun4fido | clicker training 4 dogs

    over-the-counter CALMATIVES and stress-lowering -
    for both humans and pups or dogs! :thumbup:
    Pet Forums Community - View Single Post - dog body-language - and why it matters so much...

    Pet Forums Community - View Single Post - 4 Month old staff x collie biting problems please help i am a 1st time dog owner
    using a time-out... ;)

    Pet Forums Community - View Single Post - Our new Puppy, shes driving my crazy :eek:(

    and here -
    puppy-socialization per pups + dogs, Vs risk of contagion; cost : benefit - Pet Forums Community

    Open Paw’s Guide To The First Two Weeks With Your New Dog | Dog Star Daily

    Puppy Biting | Dog Star Daily

    YouTube - How to teach 'leave it'- without intimidation
    anything by *kikopup* is safe and generally Excellent!, too :thumbup:

    happy training, and congratulations!
    --- terry
     
  14. lozb

    lozb PetForums VIP

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    I have turned into a human pin-cushion :cursing:
    Baxter jumps, bites - my coat, my arm, my leg, my bum... you name it and he's after biting it!
    Usually half way into a walk - or when we've reached the field. So, I'm presuming this is pure excitement...?
    Thankfully, he's not nipping my 8 year old...
    Just me! :eek:
    Blocking and using my leg to stop him getting to me seems to get him more excited - he seems to think this makes it a game!

    We met a man on the field this afternoon with 3 gorgeous (and well behaved) terriers of some sort - he was very calm.... said one of his was like that and ended up pulling her teeth out with it all! Said he held her close to his chest and repeated 'Calm down' in a calm, quiet voice over and over until she calmed down. Which seems fine in a small/medium terrier but Baxter is already massive! I've tried it - just strolking him and going 'ssshh' calming which works for about, ooh, 10 seconds....

    I'm sure it'll just be time before he stops this behaviour and I'll check out the links in the post above to help too.

    Just wanted to vent! :rolleyes: :p
     
  15. Horse and Hound

    Horse and Hound PetForums VIP

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    Not read everything on hear but now if Rupert bites me or the OH too hard we make a really, high pitched yelp kind of noise.

    He stops, sticks his ears up, and then lies his head on your arm.

    Then starts again 5 minutes later!
     
  16. busterandlulu

    busterandlulu PetForums Junior

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    Im having exactly the same problem, my 9 week yorkie nips at my feet and runs after my toddler and nips at his. Luckily it doesn't really hurt. But as soon as I show him a toy or something more interesting he plays with that instead. Its only been a few days and he seems to be getting the grip of it.
     
  17. kez86

    kez86 PetForums Newbie

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    hi im having same problem my westie is now 11 weeks old
    some days shes constantly wanting to nip my hands and feet ive tried sayin no and doesnt seem to work, ive also been giving her toys in place of my hands
    i dont know if it cause she bored as i cant take her out yet has she had a major op at 7 weeks and doesnt have her last injection till 2mora

    ive booked her in for puppy classes hopin they will help along with what im doin with her at min
     
  18. Nick Jones

    Nick Jones PetForums Junior

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    Let your pup drag a house training line when you're home (spray it liberally with anti chew spray to deter chewing the line) any running in at your feet or trousers can result in a quick and easy lifting of the line as you say 'Off!'
    Then place the end of the lead over a radiator valve or door handle or secure fixed point for a minute or so whilst you ignore the dog. Be sure to make the dog's behaviour more of a negative result than the fun it finds at present.

    With young dogs I would let them make the mistake by setting them up to fail, and then being in a good position to correct the behaviour there and then.

    Squeels of 'No!' and dropping in toys can often excite the dog and reward it. Be careful that you're not heavy in your handling, but getting a clear message across that it's unwanted, and will result in a negative experience.

    Once the dog can handle you walking past without reaction you can ask for a sit and treat.

    Doing this with a helper can speed things up more quickly.

    Good luck!

    Nick
     
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