Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Help with a nipping pup

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Cloudy Star, Jun 13, 2009.


Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. StBernardMummy

    StBernardMummy PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2010
    Messages:
    191
    Likes Received:
    1
    My new pup Murphy nips a little when were playing and has taken a dislike to my favourite oversized jumped which he fights with whether I'm wearing it or not! I know he's only playing but it can be quite painful, his little baby teeth are like needles! I've found getting him one of those rope tuggy toys distracts him from eating my jumper.

    Thank you for the links though. They will come in very handy :)

    Leanne x
     
  2. stigDarley

    stigDarley PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2010
    Messages:
    512
    Likes Received:
    5

    I have a 3 nearly 4 month Akita X German shep puppy. We rescued her at 9 weeks and she was also a nipper. I have to admit that I did a Dog whisper type bite on her. Which is to nip her very very lightly with you hand, on her back quarter. It symilates mum nipping. As trying to give her other things to do is ignoring the dominace issue. You need to be very clearly "the pack leader" I also have a 11 month dobe and he's a fantastic dog. The Akita is now no longer nipping. She's alot better behaved.

    I really do think what Ceaser has to say makes alot of sense!
     
  3. stigDarley

    stigDarley PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2010
    Messages:
    512
    Likes Received:
    5
    You want to be careful playing tuggy with puppies, as again its a dominace game. Also the roots in there teeth are not fully grown until there older!
     
  4. Amber1612

    Amber1612 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi all

    I am so relieved to read this thread! We have a young pup (Mum died) she is 7.5 weeks old now, cross American Bulldog and Mastiff and although she is a clever girl and can be loving the biting is reallllly getting me down.

    Tried the yelping, no, dominating her, offering a toy in place of me but if she is in one of those moods it does not matter. I am sure that she is not aggressive and it is all puppy play but sometimes she is relentless. Comes at me time and time again, growling, barking snapping and you all know how much it hurts when they chomp down. She is going to be going to obedience classes and I know that she will get it but it has made me feel disappointment about the new pup I suppose!

    Reading all the posts here it sounds like there are alot of us in the same position with lots of little puncture wounds and scratches!!

    Fingers crossed that this phase passes quickly! I am more worried about damage she might do to my girls (13 and 6)!

    Amber
     
  5. luvmydogs

    luvmydogs PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    4,656
    Likes Received:
    158
    I love Ian Dunbar. Do you have any more refs to his stuff please?
     
  6. Clare7435

    Clare7435 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Messages:
    5,927
    Likes Received:
    518
    I'm going through this with Penny right now, she doesn't nip, just thinks everything that moves is a chew toy, usually everything that moves on me, or even Fizz's legs will do much to Fizz's annoyence.
    The Dogs have an old wicker dog bed full of toys, balls, chews, a wooden roling pin is the fave...oh and a teething blanket from tesco baby dept with a bears head in the middle and knoted ends, they're spoilt rotton lol....but when she stars the whole knarling thing I get her basket and empty the entire contents on the floor and stick her in the middle, works well...she spends ages chewing, bringing me things and generally tiring herself out xx
     
  7. Anakat

    Anakat PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    It was good to read this as i'm a little at my wits end with our 12 week cocker boy - who can be so easy when out and about, but very bitey (hard) especially towards my hands and arms and my daughters feet. We have tried mimicking a dogs cry, saying no and squirting with water - also distracting him with toys. but he doesn't seem to get that this is not on.

    He has a lot of energy and tends to bite at these times. We have lots of toys and things for him to safely bite/chew - any advice please would be most welcome! p.s. It's almost as if he's trying to dominate and it's worrying me because of my 4 year old daughter.
     
  8. RAINYBOW

    RAINYBOW PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    10,270
    Likes Received:
    541
    I think cockers can be a beggar for this. Mine is over a year now but i remember thinking the nipping would never end and worrying about it (i have a 3 and 6 year old)

    I used the timeout on him too as everything else just made him more excitable and bitey so the timeout just gave everyone a chance to calm down a bit ;).

    A Consistent and persistent approach is the only think that works in the end but it is generally just a phase.

    Get your little one involved in training ASAP, even if it's just little things like making pup sit with a treat :wink: and ensure that high value treats (like bones or hide chews, pigs ears etc, are never given while your child has access to the pup :))

    A great book to buy is The Perfect Puppy by Gwen Bailey :)
     
    leashedForLife likes this.
  9. alysonandhedley

    alysonandhedley PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2009
    Messages:
    905
    Likes Received:
    11
    Moderators!!

    I think this sticky needs a bit of tidying up. It might be me but the early links dont work anymore, so if you refer a new forum member to this they might get a bit frustrated trawling through and not finding any working links. I just revisited it and had problems.
     
  10. RAINYBOW

    RAINYBOW PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    10,270
    Likes Received:
    541
    might be worth PMing one of them about it as they might miss this post :)
     
  11. The Dog Butler

    The Dog Butler PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2010
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Of course waiting until the storm calms down, i.e. when he becomes an old dog that has lived through its energy seems for most as the most humane solution but I say giving your pup back the same attitude is much more difficult but can produce much sooner results.

    In the end this is what dogs do in the park when approached by the dog that is more energetic and dominant. They either submit and go on their back and hope for the least or tail under and try run/hide away and/or near the owner or go on the back legs to appear taller and snap back.

    I am sorry my reply does not give you a suggestion because I do not know what is acceptable for you but give us a clue of what lengths are you prepared to go to stop your dog nipping your feet, etc.

    Some say its disrespect to you and a sign of dominance, some say its just a puppy playing and each one addresses it differently. If you believe dominant, then act back like a more dominant one, if believing puppy playing then distract it with an alternative.

    But as far as I have learned, animals do not play but exercise their instincts for the future survival and there is no better alternative than exercising their survival technique on a weaker pack member.

    :)
     
  12. Corinthian

    Corinthian PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    382
    Likes Received:
    22
    No. Don't abuse the pup. It's bad advice and you can read many threads with far better suggestions.
     
  13. mags06

    mags06 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Great to hear this i have a 10 week old golden cocker and love her so much but i am having the exact same problem but when i shout or smack her she gets very angry and barks at me should i be more calm and ignore this in the hope that she grows out of this please help as i don't want to be angry with her for this for too long!!!!!!!!
     
  14. mags06

    mags06 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    thanks willjust hang on inthere x
     
  15. mags06

    mags06 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the advice
     
  16. Doglistener1

    Doglistener1 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    5
    This may help I wrote it a few years ago.

    Bite Inhibition​



    Puppies have painfully sharp little piranha like teeth, almost like hypodermic needles, fortunately the jaw muscles are extremely under-developed, One of the main reasons why you should never play tug with a young puppy as you could dislocate the jaw and misalign or damage the teeth.

    Nature has given them these underdeveloped muscles to enable pups to play-bite safely. Whilst very young and still with his brothers and sisters and he bites too hard in play he gets blasted with a ear piercing "yelp" which makes him immediately back off, he waits a while then starts to play again, but a strange thing has happened, the biting is a bit softer. The same thing when feeding from the mother, the pup uses too much pressure she yelps and moves away end of milk bar. He is then gentler the next time round and a valuable lesson has been learned.

    This is nature’s way of inhibiting the force of their bite well before the jaw muscles start to form properly at around about 4.5 months, which also coincides with the time that the puppy teeth start dropping out and the new bigger more dangerous teeth start to come through. This is called the age of cutting.

    This learning process is known as “Bite Inhibition” it is a vital and important lesson and is the only reason why your puppies are born with those hideous teeth. This is how your puppy learns to inhibit the force of his bite and to control his jaws, It is a vital that he also learns to inhibit biting us humans.

    I see many new owners who are told to stop all play biting, however this could potentially have far-reaching and disastrous consequences. If the pup is trained immediately never to play-bite, he will never have the chance to learn control over his jaws. Therefore, your puppy must initially learn that all biting whatever the circumstances must be done softly. Then you can start to teach him never to bite at all.

    This is how you should deal with this problem

    1. Permit the puppy to play-bite by allowing your pup to softly chew on your hand. When he bites down a little harder than normal, "yelp" sharply and loudly and very short, turning your head away in rejection. Do not pull your hand away or the place he is biting. Let the puppy move away from the sound and your hand or leg, (pulling your hand away will only encourage him to lunge towards the moving object)

    As an appeasement after your yelp the pup may come up and lick your hand, accept this gesture. Then allow the play to resume, but this time hopefully with a softer bite. If the play gets a little rougher, "yelp" again, thus further confirming that any pressure is totally unacceptable. Repeat this exercise as often as possible. And like the New York police chief who had a zero tolerance to crime you do the same with any hard biting.

    You will find within a few days, that the biting turns into mouthing; you will have programmed your puppy into thinking that he must not exert any pressure whatsoever whilst mouthing because of your ultra sensitive reaction. Now you can teach him the “OFF command to stop all mouthing.

    Stan Rawlinson 2002
     
  17. lizzyboo

    lizzyboo PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,455
    Likes Received:
    22
    Our cutesen dutesen pup is 'normal'.... hooray lol. We have had an escalation in 'biting' in the last couple of days (granted we have only had him since saturday but want to get the whole nipping under control as soon as possible a shave lots of friends with little children)

    I have tried 'no' and offering him a substitute, this is ok for 10 secs then he comes back with avengence, and i swear bigger teeth lol. I have tried the yelping too, but he just thinks we are playing with him and either comes at us again or growls and barks........... so now we give him lots of attention when he is being 'lovely' and turn our back and walk away from him when he nips and bites! So far.... so good!
     
    #97 lizzyboo, Apr 7, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2010
  18. ladyb00

    ladyb00 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Glad to hear there are many other people tearing their hair out with nipping and it's not just us. We got our 10week old German Wirehaired Pointer 'Albert' on Saturday and he is into everything and biting with the sharpest of teeth and claws. We are trying the ignoring and 'yelping as if it it hurting' when he trys and sometimes it works but his attention span is so short. He also seems to go for every plant to bite in the garden which worries me as I know some can be dangerous to animals although I'm not sure what is and isn't. I try to ignore him when he bites the plants but he still seems intent on chewing them. Any advice!! I suppose he will settle down a little once he can go out more (only just had first jab so still a couple of weeks to go yet). A friend of mine says you can buy something which you spray onto items to stop them chewing them..anybody tried this and is it any good!. Looking forward to many more chewed feet.....:D
     
  19. RAINYBOW

    RAINYBOW PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    10,270
    Likes Received:
    541
    I would start to teach the "leave" command :) Hold a treat in your palm, make him sit and offer him the treat, if he goes for it close your palm amd say "leave" firmly the second he withdraws open your palm and say take it, if he "snatches" close you palm again. Only let him have the treat when he isn't trying to grab it (if that makes sense).

    This will take time to teach but it is good to make a start. I would keep him away from the plants for now by attaching a long line in the garden and not letting him at them.

    I found a "time out" worked better than yelping, some dogs seem to find the yelping too exciting.

    If the dog is being over playful and gets nippy then a few minutes out of the room with zero attention then reintroduced calmly will help but i would re iterate this will take time (possibly a couple of months of hard work). It is an age and stage thing and you just have to train through it in a consistent way :)
     
  20. leashedForLife

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2009
    Messages:
    19,309
    Likes Received:
    3,662
    reliable resources:
    DogStarDaily website - i strongly recommend downloading the 2 *free* pdf-file books to be found there -
    Free Downloads | Dog Star Daily
    the titles are Before U Get Ur Dog and After... .
    they cover socialization and bite-inhibition exceptionally well! :thumbsup:



    fun4fido posted a helpful blog-link, but it did not work -
    Teaching Bite*Inhibition - blog - fun4fido | clicker training 4 dogs
    hopefully this one will! :D


    ** this ** OTOH links to a frequent-spammer -
    Stop Dog Biting – How To Stop Your Dog Biting
    and the recommended advice - hold the muzzle shut etc - are very bad suggestions, IMO. :thumbdown:
    how grateful will a future vet-tech or vet or groomer be when the pup or dog later DUCKS and growls :eek:
    or simply evades and gets nervous, when anyone reaches for their collar or tries to examine or treat or clean
    their ears, mouth, eyes, teeth, etc! :eek:
    they will be less than happy, pursuing the dogs snaking head, and even more unhappy if the dog gets anxious-enuf
    to snap defensively when they persist! :yikes:

    puppies are no different than infants + toddlers -
    they explore the world with their mouths, testing textures, edibility, finding out what this is.
    also dog-mouths are the analogy of human-hands - they use them to manipulate the world and objects in it.
    how else can they pick something up, play with a friend, nibble an itch, groom-out a burr, etc? thats what dog-mouths do!

    pups who leave their dams + sibs before 56-days / 8-WO are especially prone to be hard-mouthed and have very poor
    to non-existent dog to dog social-skills: signaling play, non-threat, appeasement, deference, greeting, etc.
    RETURNING the pup to mom + sibs is the best option -
    if U cannot or do not, find other pup-tolerant adult-dogs to teach the puppy Dog-Social-Skills, as we cannot teach that.

    Open Paw’s Guide To The First Two Weeks With Your New Dog | Dog Star Daily

    Puppy Biting | Dog Star Daily

    YouTube - How to teach 'leave it'- without intimidation
    anything by *kikopup* is safe and generally Excellent!, too :thumbup:

    SINGLETONS are a special-case -
    pups born solo or sole-survivors - are often even worse, as they never experience any frustration
    as neonates and juveniles, but their dam (or foster, whether human or other) is entirely focused on that ONE -
    they can become intensely-resentful of any interference in their goals and desires, and may BITE full-force and
    full-mouth over such minor things as stopping them at the door to clip a leash on their collar!

    if U are a pet-owner who has adopted or bought a pup who was a singleton, Get * Early * Professional * Help
    from a CAAB, vet-behaviorist, or highly-experienced pos-R trainer who is familiar with Behavior-Modification.
    APDT-uk or COAPE are safe resources -
    if OTOH U find a supposedly-good trainer who starts spouting dominance, RUN do not walk, away!
    singleton-pups meet the mildest of restraint or interruptions with serious threat, and will escalate to violence
    with little provocation!
    rehearsing or practicing violence is not at all helpful - in fact, it is seriously detrimental.

    if U are breeding and get a singleton,
    find a foster-dam - k9, feline, a pig with a litter, who cares! - ASAP.
    let the pup nurse the dam immediately for colostrum over the 1st 12-hours, but spend that time finding a foster-dam,
    of any mammal-species - a shelter-dam with a litter, another breeder with a small-litter, etc.
    OR alternatively find a foster-litter for the pup-mother to rear with this solo-pup; either way works.
    the foster-litter brought to the dam of the single-pup can be bunnies, kittens, it does not matter; any mammal
    that is not a rabies-vector species is fine, mum will generally take them to her bosom immediately.

    happy training,
    --- terry
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice