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Help needed with new bit....

Discussion in 'Horse Tack and Equipment' started by Chatcat, Jul 30, 2016.


  1. Chatcat

    Chatcat Guest

    Hi, we have a new pony, welsh, 10 years, but acts like 4 years, several issues, ie, never been schooled or handled much, ridden too hard too young, separation anxiety, etc, etc. But, is a sweet and lovely boy, with lots of potential. We have had him a couple of months, and already he is a million times better to be handled, gently schooled, trailer trained, etc.

    So, my problem is, i've noticed when teaching my daughter in the school, that he is putting his tongue over the bit, and snatching the reins down. My daughter is very gentle, very light, only 7 1/2 stone. He has had his back looked at, and is okay. He was given to us with an eggbutt single jointed snaffle. Now, I was thinking of getting a sweet iron double jointed bit with copper lozenge. However, I have read and reread all the info on google and now am thoroughly confused. What bit would anyone recommend? I don't just want to keep using the bit he came with, as that is not neccessarily the one for him.
     
  2. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    I like the bit you are describing, have you tried it yet. If you have a real problem with him getting his tongue over the bit you might have to go for a ported bit.
     
  3. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

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    I am assuming you have had an equine dentist check for any issues?

    Sometimes the search for the right bit will depend on the reason for this behaviour, if anatomical it can be trial and error.

    I always found a ported kimblewick hard to beat.
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  4. FlorayG

    FlorayG PetForums Junior

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    Well single jointed snaffles are a bt nasty IMO, they stick into the roof of the pony's mouth s a double jointed would be better. As for putting his tongue over the bit he has a reason for doing this so please don't strap his mouth shut ( not that you have suggested this so good for you). If he is a pet pnly for your daughter to ride does it matter? When I was a kid I had a pony who did this endlessly but he was still a great pony. It might be a habit he has just got and can't help now.
     
  5. Wiz201

    Wiz201 PetForums VIP

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    A different bit might get him out of the habit. A loose flash noseband attachment might just help though. If he keeps snatching the reins down and this is only a 7 stone child on a pony ten times stronger, this is not something can't be just ignored.
     
  6. FlorayG

    FlorayG PetForums Junior

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    Of course not - but this habit isn't a bit issue it's a training issue
     
  7. Chatcat

    Chatcat Guest

    Gosh, well, thanks very much for your thoughts. My daughter is 16 but is luckily only 7 stone, think miniature adult! It does matter that he has this habit because he is very strong and it is clear that he can take off and the bit over the tongue results in absolutely no stopping power at all. I totally agree that the single joint sticks into his upper palate. At the moment I am going to go for either a Kimblewick or a Happy Tongue. Also, had back checked and new saddle purchased, plus he is much happier now we are riding hacking and schooling almost every day. I think this is a habit/boredom/training issue, as you say. Many thanks for your thoughts.
     
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