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Help needed with a Sprollie who wants to chase cars.......

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Presley 21, Mar 1, 2017.


  1. Presley 21

    Presley 21 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi, Has anyone experienced their dog wanting to chase cars when on and off the lead. My puppy Presley is now 8 months old and recently has just started to chase cars..... I can only lead walk him at the moment, unless I go to a park with no roads close by. He sees the cars from a distance and wants to run over and chase them. Whilst walking him on the lead I carry lots of treats and try and get his attention when a car drives past to look at me and not the car. He doesn't do it all the time but I am not convinced yet he is okay off the lead near a road.

    If anyone else has experienced this with their dog can you give me some suggestions that may have worked for you.....I would really appreciate it.

    Thanks
     
  2. mollypip

    mollypip PetForums Senior

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    Hi, I have a collie who does this, and its the herding instinct that causes it, they basically want to chase and try to control the car, or many other things that move.

    Its extremely difficult to stop this, as its a behaviour deep in the collie genes and please never, ever, allow your dog off lead near a road with cars, no matter how much you think she may be ok.

    Even though my collie adores food, trying to distract her with treats never worked, trying to distract her with squeaky toy never worked, nothing seemed to work!! I could never find anything interesting enough to redirect her. So for the most part I stay away as much as I can from busy roads, and just manage it.
    Trucks and trailers are the worst for her she just goes mad with them, so I bend to her level and try to restrain her as best I cca, rather than have her twisting and turning all over the place on her lead. Over the years she's become a bit more moderate but unfortunately I never managed to fix it!
    To be honest I don't even think too much about it anymore, its just part of life with her. But shes worth every ounce of trouble!
    Sorry I couldn't be of more help but maybe someone else may have a new suggestion.
     
  3. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    I remember seeing a lady with a collie who, I guess, wanted to chase cars. I often saw her sitting with the dog near the roadside and trying to distract the dog from cars that went past. It wasn't a busy road as we live in the country, but she spent hours with the dog slowly, slowly getting him to be calm in the presence of moving vehicles. A long time later, and I think I could say there was a year or two involved here, I would see her calmly walking her dog along the road who had finally realised that cars were not there to be chased.

    The desire to chase is very deeply engrained in many collies and they will use that need inappropriately at times.
    Make absolutely sure he never gets off the lead onto a road as the result could be too awful to contemplate.

    Is there a distance where he doesn't react to moving cars? That will be the place to start, you need to be at the point where he doesn't react and will accept treats. Just stand or sit there with him and encourage him to interact with you. Allow him to look and reward for not reacting. This will take time, but hopefully you will be able to go closer and not get a reaction.
     
    AlexPed2393 likes this.
  4. Little P

    Little P PetForums VIP

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    What exactly does your dog do when a car goes past?

    I'm not sure this is a herding instinct. I've had collies my entire life and not had a single car chaser.

    My terrier however....!!
     
    FeelTheBern likes this.
  5. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

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    If your dog likes chasing change the target and give it something to chase!

    Frisbee, ball, whatever, dogs that like to run and chase must have an outlet for this, a safe one.

    It is no different from dogs wanting to chase deer etc
     
    Magyarmum likes this.
  6. Presley 21

    Presley 21 PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for all your messages.

    I have noticed he is becoming more calmer on the lead. He doesn't do it to all cars but I feel he needs more training before I can let him off the lead in a park near a road. I took him yesterday to a local park but walked him to a safe area in the park where he could not see or hear cars and he was happy running around fetching the ball for me. Its seems to have happened all of a sudden he never use to do this. I think walking him more on the lead getting him use to the sound of the traffic on a daily basis and hopefully he will get use to it so it doesn't bother him anymore. I know it is going to take time and perseverance with lots of distractions when he pulls on the lead towards cars. I want to be able to take him on walks and not worry about cars......
     
  7. Chatcat

    Chatcat Guest

    I'm a newbie to dog owning too, but my collie is now 19 months. I'd just like to say be really careful as your dog becomes a teenager. When I first got my dog she developed fantastic recall, but as she became a teenager it all went pear shaped, there were several near misses with roads and train track, and now she is not allowed off lead unless she is fenced in. I was upset at first, but now I have a very long retractable lead, which will do the job until she grows up (some people seem to think a collie is puppylike until 5!!!).
     
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