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Help! My puppy is aggressive

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Sophie Parkins, Jan 15, 2019.


  1. Sophie Parkins

    Sophie Parkins PetForums Newbie

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    2 weeks ago we got our beautiful staffie puppy Jaxon. Having 3 staffies before and loosing my beloved girl 18 months ago I decided to take the plunge and get a pup. The first few days were lovely and he was such a lovely pup, however the past few days he has become a nightmare! He has started to become very aggressive (I know that nipping is natural) but he seems to be becoming more and more vicious and is drawing blood, going for feet and dragging on my trousers. We had a visit from a personal trainer last week who gave us advice on how to tackle these things but nothing seems to be working. If anyone has any advice I would be extremely grateful
     
  2. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    He’s really isn’t being aggressive, just being a mouthy puppy. As puppies explore with their mouths everything goes in it. Your job is to make her understand that nipping humans and clothes is not on.
    I found what really stopped my dog was to get up without saying a word, stand in a corner with my arms crossed and out of the way and totally ignore her. If she was really being annoying then walking out of the room and leaving her on her own for a long a minute. The idea is for the puppy to learn that biting will mean she loses your attention and as puppies hate being ignored then this will work. However it is not something that happens quickly especially with staffies who are a mouthy breed when young. You need to be very consistent in what you do so that means every single time she bites you get up and stand in the corner or leave the room. You could be doing this for quite a few weeks before your puppy gets it
     
  3. niamh123

    niamh123 PetForums VIP

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    Put your mind at rest he isn't being aggressive just being a normal puppy
     
  4. Sophie Parkins

    Sophie Parkins PetForums Newbie

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    Sorry aggressive is probably the wrong word. I was writing this as my feet were being bitten and growled at! Nice to be reassured that this is normal. I have been lucky enough not to be bitten to this degree with previous dogs and has been driving me insane thinking there may be something wrong. Thanks!
     
  5. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    My pup insists upon attacking my floaty pjs I redirect by doing some training getting him into a sit and trying to learn some tricks. It's normal don't worry.
     
  6. danielled

    danielled Guest

    I’d like to congratulate you. You have a perfectly normal puppy. Have a toy ready to put in his mouth when he starts mouthing.
     
  7. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    Hopefully your trainer gave you some good advice such as has already been suggested (remaining calm, standing still, excluding your self from the puppy for a while, not getting puppy too excited etc) in which case these methods do work - but as you have only had your puppy two weeks and only saw the trainer last week I think you need to give everything a little more time.

    Without a doubt some puppies are more nippy and more tenacious than others, so have some good toys ready and a baby gate set up so exclusion/escape is easy. It is normal behaviour, though when you have a puppy hanging off your trouser leg or nip marks all up your arm, it is sometimes hard to remember that! Have another chat with your trainer perhaps.

    J
     
  8. niamh123

    niamh123 PetForums VIP

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    Have just been through this with Liam believe me it does get better,it started reducing by about 11 weeks of age:)
     
  9. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    My tibetan terrier was a VERY mouthy pup. His whole litter was mouthy.

    In fact, even now he is coming up 6yrs, he still feels the urge to give a little nip (very gentle) if he gets very excited.

    We crate trained him from the outset and had a puppy pen too. My daughter was just turned 5 when we got him. He stopped nipping both my daughter and me very early on. I think we only suffered a couple of nips each.

    With my daughter, he nipped her and she burst into hysterical crying. The timing must have been perfect as murph never ever nipped her again.

    Similar with me. He ran behind me and bit right into the back of my knee. I screamed very sharply and he never touched me again.

    However with other family members, or in fact anyone else, he was mouthy. My OH got the worst of it because he is quietly spoken and tried to push murphy away with his hands. Of course, great game for a puppy! So there's a tip - get your hands tucked in and use your voice.

    Training him to bite on an antler worked largely. He understood that. When he got excited, he frantically looked for the antler. When walking in woods, he'd pick up a stick. And as he got older, his nipping got gentler.
    We did use time outs though - in both crate and pen.


    On a positive note, pups that bite a lot get loads of feedback about the strength of their bites and turn into dogs with very safe jaws.

    It's the ones that never nip you need to watch. Every cloud!
     
    niamh123 and Lurcherlad like this.
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