Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Help! My dog WON'T stop pulling!

Discussion in 'Dog Walking' started by Sonnygibson185, Jan 7, 2013.


  1. Sonnygibson185

    Sonnygibson185 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello

    I have a 10 month old staffy crossed with a Labrador. His name is Archie and he is the most naughty dog I have ever had. He doesn't respond to punishment at all and does whatever he wants.

    When we walk him he constantly pulls and he's gotten too strong now for my partner to walk him as he just pulls her over. We have tried pulling him back to where we stand and giving him a treat so that he walks by our side... We have tried stopping and turning around when he pulls. We stop when he pulls and he comes back to us but when we praise him he gets excited and runs away again pulling

    Is there anything I can do to prevent him pulling? We have tried a choker but he just keeps pulling and choking himself and it doesn't prevent anything

    He is naughty but we are trying to wait out his excitement by the fact that he is still just a puppy for a few more months

    Any help is appreciated


    Thanks
     
  2. erinn

    erinn Guest

    Hi, no advice really apart from maybe joining a training class? You've tried to correct the behavior yourselves, perhaps time to involve a professional?

    I've highlighted the part in bold - I think it's safe to safe his 'puppy pass' has long since expired, you've got an unruly adolescent on your hands and now is the time to correct the naughtiness :D

    Best of luck.
     
  3. Wiz201

    Wiz201 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2012
    Messages:
    6,421
    Likes Received:
    867
    You should have taught him good behaviour on the lead whilst he was still a smaller puppy. Try finding a training class and perhaps try a headcollar? I recommend kumfi or gencon.
     
  4. hippymama

    hippymama PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2012
    Messages:
    938
    Likes Received:
    9
    i know a lot of people recommend head collars , I think dogmatic is ment to be a good brand or halti ?
     
  5. mel@fish

    [email protected] PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    678
    Likes Received:
    7
    I really rate haltis. I used haltis on both of mine and they worked wonders. I needed to have control of them when I had knee surgery a few times over the past couple of years. The haltis worked as soon as I put them on. I have now trained them both to the word 'back' if they even start to pull but to be honest I don't have to put them on leads very often now, partly because I walk in open countryside and partly because I have trained them persistently. It is very frustrating training a dog to walk to heal on the lead nicely and it can take much longer than you think at times, particularly if you have a young dog with a stubborn head!! If your dog is very food motivated then keep up with the treats. My youngest dog was very ball motivated but I use the fish4dogs training treats which are superb as they stink and the dogs love them! Try a halti, they really do work. Once your dog gets used to walking to heal on one of these then you can take it off and confirm training through treats etc.:)
     
  6. Hardwick Hounds

    Hardwick Hounds PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    May 30, 2012
    Messages:
    501
    Likes Received:
    23
    Pulling on the lead requires extreme consistency to correct.

    Firstly, I would suggest a head harness like the halti or dogmatic, to allow you to walk him safely and easily straight away allowing you time to train him. Don't bother with choke chains, slip leads or any harness while he pulls. A halti or a collar and lead. They will protest against a head collar at first but they get used to it.

    To stop my great dane from pulling, each time she put any strain on the lead I immediately stopped saying "Ah-Ah" in a stern voice, then asked her to sit. I waited a few seconds then said "ok". As soon as she put strain on the lead again I repeated this. I repeated it and repeated it and repeated it until she got the message. It took me 2 walks for her to stop pulling on the lead and now whenever I stop, she stops and sits. She will occasionally pull on the lead and if she does, I repeat this technique. If you don't do this every single time, you won't achieve the results you want.

    From what you have written it sounds as though pulling on the lead may not be the only unwanted behaviour your dog is displaying so can I suggest other things to help you?

    Change the way you are in the house, ie, don't get him all excited for walks before you set out, don't let him on the sofa unless he sits and waits for permission, don't stroke him if he 'demands' fusses only when it is on your terms, crate train him. Every dog owner has their own preferences regarding rules in the house but I find these kind of rules to be beneficial when you have an unruly dog on your hands.

    Try hand feeding. See here

    Don't punish. Ignore unwanted behaviour or have a time out place. If our danes have had what I call 'a vile-dog moment' they are calmly led to their kennel and calmly locked inside for an hour, and let out when they are calm and sitting patiently.

    He is at that adolescent age and they don't start to calm down until they're around 2 IMO.

    Does he understand basic commands like sit etc? How long have you had him?
     
  7. 8tansox

    8tansox PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2010
    Messages:
    5,718
    Likes Received:
    2,254
    I think I'd be trying to enroll in a good training school where you learn how to have a better relationship with your dog. Find one where all members of the family can attend and one that uses kind methods only. Stay away from check-chains, they do too much damage to the dog's neck.

    You don't have to attend training for years, just enough to grasp the basics and put them into practice. You never know, you might enjoy it, and having a well trained an obedient Staffie is a great way to show off the breed in a better light than they normally get. :D
     
  8. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    15,187
    Likes Received:
    8,995
    I think you will find that he is not doing things deliberately to annoy you, he just does not know what you want and he is doing what works ie he pulls and you continue to walk to his destination.

    There are many methods of training loose lead walking below you will find links to those recommended by reputable and qualified trainers and behaviourists.

    Read through them and select the one that you think will work for you.

    http://www.deesdogs.com/documents/loose_leash_diagramed.doc
    http://www.deesdogs.com/documents/letsgoforawalktogether.pdf
    http://www.deesdogs.com/documents/strolling_on_lead.doc
    http://www.deesdogs.com/documents/walkingyourdogwithheadhalter.pdf
    http://www.apdt.co.uk/documents/Looselead_000.pdf
    http://www.cleverdogcompany.com/tl_files/factsheets/Pulling on the lead.pdf
    How to Teach Loose-Leash Walking | Karen Pryor Clicker Training
    Leash Walking « Ahimsa Dog Blog
    http://www.pawsitivelydogs.co.uk/LLW.pdf



    Look under loose leash walking here:


    ClickerSolutions Training Articles Contents

    Books:

    My dog pulls what do I do?
    By Turid Rugaas
    Help, my dog pulls on the lead
    by Erica Peachey
    Can’t Pull, Won’t Pull
    By Alison Rowbotham

    DVD

    Your Clever Dog: How to stop your dog pulling on the lead
    Sarah Whitehead

    Why dogs pull: the secret your dog doesn’t want you to know; How to stop pulling instantly; What you need to do before you even attach the lead; Why the type of walks you go on matter.
    Includes: Training DVD, training manual, clicker, tote bag.

    Dogtrain.co.uk
     
  9. BoredomBusters

    BoredomBusters PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2011
    Messages:
    4,436
    Likes Received:
    358
    I would invest in a training course - at 10 months your dog is an adult, or at the very least, an adolescent. If you don't want to do a whole course for one problem, a good trainer can take just your dog and help you work with him. If you're anywhere near Essex I run workshops where we only work on not pulling!

    Stopping pulling on the lead is hard work, I don't like head collars and you might find you can't get one to fit your dog depending on the shape of his head. Try a halti harness, which goes on the body in the meantime.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. Wiz201

    Wiz201 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2012
    Messages:
    6,421
    Likes Received:
    867
    A dog his size and build will just find it easier to pull on a harness.
     
  11. BoredomBusters

    BoredomBusters PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2011
    Messages:
    4,436
    Likes Received:
    358
    Halti harnesses are no pull harnesses and we walk lots of dogs on them that we couldn't walk without.
     
  12. Hardwick Hounds

    Hardwick Hounds PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    May 30, 2012
    Messages:
    501
    Likes Received:
    23
    I've never tried the halti harness and it does look good. I would suggest to the OP to stick to brands like halti and dogmatic because the stop-pull harness at Pets at Home (own brand) is awful, it does not achieve anything and just tightens around the dogs chest under the front legs.

    I would agree that normal harnesses just make it easier for a dog to pull and harder for the owner to control.

    Not everyone likes head collars, for different reasons. I like them and although none of my dogs pull, my great danes don't go out without one on because they are so strong that if they did lunge/pull sharply, I wouldn't be able to stop them without it so I feel much safer to have it there just in case.
     
  13. Daneandrottiemum

    Daneandrottiemum PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2011
    Messages:
    297
    Likes Received:
    23
    Ditto - I use a a Dogmatic head harness for my Great Dane with a double ended lead, one end attached to his collar the other attached to the head harness. He walks very well on the lead but there's always the possibility of a surprise lunge or pull that would have (and have had!) me off my feet in seconds.

    OP, the Gencon All in One is also pretty effective, my sister uses one for her bullmastiff who she can't manage on a normal lead with great results.

    I would also ask what you have done so far to teach him not to pull? I note that you mention that he doesn't respond to punishment - what type of punishment?
     
  14. Wiz201

    Wiz201 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2012
    Messages:
    6,421
    Likes Received:
    867
    Well, considering some can be the size of miniature horses, I don't blame you. I do know someone who walks a dane successfully just on her collar and a lead though.
     
  15. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    15,187
    Likes Received:
    8,995
    There are plenty of models of head halters about all of which have their pros and cons, what suits one dog/owner does not suit another.

    My personal favourite is the Black Dog head halter but others prefer something else.



    Black Dog Head Halter

    Agility Warehouse | Dog Agility Equipment and Supplies | Black Dog Head Halter

    The Canny Collar

    The Canny Collar - The Best Collar to Stop Dogs Pulling on the Lead

    The Dogalter

    Welcome to Kumfi

    The DogMatic

    Dogmatic Headcollar

    Gentle Controller

    GenCon All-in-1

    The Gentle Leader

    The Gentle Leader at Canine Concepts

    The Halti

    http://www.companyofanimals.co.uk/halti.php

    The K9 Bridle

    K9 Bridle | The world's first dog collar

    The Newtrix Easy Way

    Angela Stockdale, Dog Aggression Specialist - About Angela: an aggressive dog is an unhappy dog

    The SWAG headcollar

    http://www.southwestagilitygoods.co.uk/headcollar.html

    Rope Lead Head Halter

    Rope Slip Lead Head Collar Combination

    Martingale head halter

    http://www.martingaleheadcollar.co.uk/

    http://www.apbc.org.uk/system/files...aring_your_dog_for_a_muzzle_or_headcollar.pdf

    http://www.deesdogs.com/documents/walkingyourdogwithheadhalter.pdf

    If you are going to use a harness it is preferable to use one that is not a non pull one which has been designed for efficiency, comfort by those who have at their heart the well being of the dog.

    Some excellent designed ones are here:

    One is endorsed by Sarah Fisher of TTouch fame and one other by Turid Rugaas

    Tilley Farm TTouch Harnesses and Leads
    Haqihana Italian hand made dog harness
    https://www.kumfi.com/index.php/onlien-store/complete-control-harness-detail
     
  16. Owned By A Yellow Lab

    Owned By A Yellow Lab PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 16, 2012
    Messages:
    6,437
    Likes Received:
    135
    Firstly please don't use punishment - it will just harm the relationship between you and your dog.

    A Lab x Staffie is a VERY strong dog :) I would really urge you to get a headcollar. The Dogmatic is great but do contact them for sizing advice. If you get one, use it with a double-ended lead - one end attached to the headcollar, one end to the normal collar.

    The Gencon All-In-One is also great for very strong dogs - however be advised it does *tighten* quite a bit so don't use it just yet if your boy is pulling all the time.

    The Gentle Leader is another good one - - again best used with a double ended lead.

    You can get a really good double-ended lead from Ezy-dog.


    PLEASE NOTE:

    Never ever use a headcollar with a flexi/extending lead

    Never ever jerk on the lead when using a headcollar.
     
  17. Hardwick Hounds

    Hardwick Hounds PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    May 30, 2012
    Messages:
    501
    Likes Received:
    23
    We've all forgotten to ask you what you feed your dog? Certain foods like Bakers could be making your dog hyper active and they are full of cereals which are not good for dogs.

    Let us know what you are feeding him and how many meals a day.
     
  18. Sonnygibson185

    Sonnygibson185 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi everyone thanks for the replies!! :)

    We started feeding him on Eukanuba but in the 3-4 weeks he was on it he grew to incredible height & strength and we couldn't have him continue growing that big because we have already had to move house to accomadate him as we thought he would be a staffie and had a nice 3 bed house but when we found out he was part lab and he started growing so big we had to move so he could have a bigger garden, bigger room to sleep in etc... so we changed his food to Science Plan and tried that for a week or so but he outright wouldn't eat it so then we tried James Well Beloved but again he didn't like that. Now he is on Wainwrights and that's what he has been on for a while and he doesn't really 'want' to eat it but he will eat it (the dry biscuits) if we mix it with Wanwrights jellied food packages.

    For a while (maybe 3 weeks) we just fed him on Pedigree mixed with his Wainwright salmon biscuits because we couldn't buy the Wainwright jellied food at our store but now I am trying to train him properly by putting his food down and if he isn't eating it when its's just biscuits or even when we mix it, i'm taking it up and seeing if it will make him eat it.

    We are trying to train him other ways as well like when we enter the house making him go behind us and sit down until we are through the door and then we say "ok" and he comes through but he tries running ahead of us all the time so we pull him back and make him wait.

    He is very very strong though and even when we lock him in the sitting room with us he can move our 3 seater leather sofa from in front of the door just by swiping his paw and then he opens the door.

    I have contacted a professional to try and help us so we will see what happens but for now I am going to use a Halti harness or at least try it.

    We tried him on a headharness and we attached his lead to the harness and to his collar but he tore it off with his head and it was attached really really tight.

    He can be the perfect dog when he's out of energy i.e after a walk but he is just too strong for my partner to walk him and I am self employed so I leave the house at about 7 and she leaves for work at around 12pm so when she leaves he is alone for maybe 2-3 hours until I get home but that also means that from the previous night before until I get home he hasn't had any proper exercise so I do really appreciate all of you trying to help me on this so thank you all very much!

    Any more help is greatly appreciated based on what I can remember about his behaviousr here but we are going to try take him to a class or have a professional come to our home to see how he is with us and guests etc.


    Thank you!
     
  19. Wiz201

    Wiz201 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2012
    Messages:
    6,421
    Likes Received:
    867
    What sort of headcollar did you try? There are many different types. I recommend Kumfi as they make them for strong dogs
    http://www.kumfi.co.uk/ You could attach it to a half check chain collar.
    Or try this http://dog-games-shop.co.uk/perfect-fit-fleece-dog-harness/40mm-harness you can have a D ring put on the chest piece and if you attach the lead to that, you should be able to keep better control of him.
    I'm surprised you had to move from a three bed semi. My retrievers could live happily in my one bedroomed terrace with a small garden if not for the fact I work full time. Try doing mind games and clicker training if your partner finds him too strong to take out.
     
    #19 Wiz201, Jan 9, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  20. erinn

    erinn Guest

    Are you sure that's a dog you have?? :eek: :D
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice