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Help, my dog is exceptionally aggressive towards my senior dog, again, please HELP

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Liam Mcardle, May 26, 2020.


  1. Liam Mcardle

    Liam Mcardle PetForums Newbie

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    Right here it goes. I have a female Alaskan malamute who is 11 year old now and experiencing nerve degeneration and arthritis in her back end which is being kept under control with pain meds, CBD oil and Yumove senior and seems pretty happy and still enjoys her walks. I got a spring spaniel a number of years back, and unfortunately he "caught" her when she was 8 year old which is obviously far from ideal for her. She luckily had 6 healthy pups and was a brilliant mother to them and knew exactly what to do. Purely through sentimental reasons I kept a bitch. All was well until about a year and a half ago when the mother and daughter faught over food when I was at work and my girlfriend couldn't separate them so went until they couldn't anymore, the relationship between them definately changed that day and the pup seemed to take the "top dog" spot. Since then I've had to separate them a few times but the malamute comes off worse and worse each time and it's always the pup who attacks for absolutely no reason, the last time was because the malamute slipped on the two steps out the back. Its normally when the pup has been in heat but lately its anytime. The vets arent performing any non-essential procedures so I cant get her spayed but I fear even this wont help now. I'm wanting to see if anyone out there has any advice on any sort of dog fostering I can put the, now 3 year old "pup", into and get back once the malamute has gone as I adore the dog and couldn't bare to say goodbye to her forever as I know the malamute hasn't got a great deal longer left before I may have to make the dreaded decision but in the same breath it's awful watching my 1st poochy living in misery because her daughter is bullying the hell out of her. I can watch over her for now but when I go back to work I fear she may not get over another fight if 1 broke out. I understand I'm new to the community but I'm desperate for any advice any1 can give me and I thank you from the bottom of my heart in advance, I'm not expecting this fostering or caring to be free, I'm will to pay .
     
  2. moomoo10

    moomoo10 PetForums Member

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    Hi, that's a sad situation you're having to deal with. Could you leave them in separate rooms or separate them with a child gate? I've just been reading the Separation Anxiety part of the Forum and theres quite a few suggestions of aids to use for calming which might chill the younger dog. A dog behaviourist might be another idea.

    I'm sure one of the Forum seniors will have good ideas to help.
     
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  3. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    This is a very sad situation but, unfortunately, not uncommon. Once a bitch decides she won't tolerate another bitch, it's likely to be permanent.

    I had such a situation between two bitches years ago and it was difficult, to say the least.

    So far as finding foster care for your younger bitch is concerned, it won't be easy. If you don't know anyone who would do this for you, then you could try contacting Springer and Malamute Welfare, (each Breed will have a dedicated Welfare/Rescue), to see if they can help.

    Otherwise, your option would be to 'crate and rotate', not ideal, but it can work. That is that the two bitches do not have contact with each other at all. One would be removed to a room in your house for, say, an hour, whilst the other bitch is part of the family and then they're 'swapped'.

    Another option would be for your younger bitch to live outside, obviously in a well designed enclosure, for long enough to allow your older bitch to finish her life in peace.

    Your concern for your old lady is well founded, given especially that she is not the cause of the trouble and should feel safe in her final years.

    She has to be your priority.

    Normally, I would suggest you contact a Behaviourist/Trainer to work with you, but, in present circumstances, that wouldn't be possible.
     
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  4. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    Honestly I'd try and get a family member to look after the younger one while you give your old girly some much needed one on one time and TLC in her old age. You can always go and take your youngster out, but they are certainly better off apart, for everyone's sake's. Can you not just keep them separated? Rotate them throughout the day. I'm sure your older girl sleeps a lot so keep a really nice quiet comfy area for her to be alone and chill, while you have some time with you younger bitch, then swap.
    I've had to do rotating and crating, baby gates etc when introducing a new dog to one who was very over excited and wanted to bite him, and it definitely works and keeps the stress down, which will help them both in general.
     
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  5. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Obviously, foster will be hard to find atm.

    In the meantime, I would take steps to keep them separated permanently to protect the older dog, using strict management and stair gates etc.

    Once Lockdown is over get the younger dog neutered ASAP as an accidental litter from a dog with such a temperament would be very unwise.
     
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  6. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    I had a similar situation between one younger bitch (Kite) and an older one (Ziggy), but I found the triggers were illness in Ziggy which it seemed Kite could detect before I was aware of it, and with treatment things improved between them though I could never trust Kite and they were mainly separated at home (crate and rotate) or closely supervised - I could see an incident coming quite easily so could step in. It came to the point where Kite was avoiding Ziggy (who never fought back or even tried to defend herself) but Ziggy couldn't see too well and was going a bit daft so sometimes approached Kite, and could inadvertently corner her. On walks, they were mainly OK together and both would come to work with me along with my 2 other dogs but be separated there. I wouldn't have considered leaving them alone together, unsupervised - not for a second.
    It was a difficult and miserable time, went on for nearly 2 years. Ziggy's health issues were becoming more difficult to manage (she was 15 by then) so when she had a bad vestibular attack/stroke on top of everything else, I had her put to sleep. I honestly can't say that managing the tension between her and Kite played no part in the decision, but if there had been any realistic chance of Ziggy recovering to the point she could enjoy lfe, I'd have kept her going.
    Keeping them apart by whatever means is the best you can do.
    How does the male dog, the father of the youger bitch, react to all this?
     
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  7. Liam Mcardle

    Liam Mcardle PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks alot for all the responses hhejnkqbkkvybj
     
  8. Liam Mcardle

    Liam Mcardle PetForums Newbie

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    Sorry 4 year old got the phone lol. Again huge thank you for the responses.

    The separation idea is something I have thought about but would be incredibly difficult as my whole downstairs is open plan.

    All family members and friends who would take her, have dogs of their own. The way she is with other dogs I wouldn't ask put someone else pet in a potentially dangerous situation.

    So sorry to hear about Ziggy Borrowzig hope yous are well now. My malamute will be the 1st dog I've lost who is totally mine, had her from 8 weeks. As for the Springer ( the father ) he is incredibly submissive and just barks at them when it kicks off or he runs and hides.

    It's a doozey to say the least. Again guys thanks for the advice.
     
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