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Help me choose a cat that is rubbish at hunting.

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Plumduff, Aug 14, 2019.


  1. Plumduff

    Plumduff PetForums Newbie

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    I am at present catless. My previous two were rescues from feral stock, and I loved them both dearly, however they were both tremendous hunters. Birds, lizards, frogs, shrews - nothing was safe from them. I love all animals so I felt guilty about the relentless carnage on the local wildlife. I would love a cat again but if possible I would like to reduce the headcount. The cat would be mainly indoors but I would like to be able to let it out too. I live in a safe rural setting.
    I have a few ideas and would love peoples thoughts and experiences. One idea is to adopt a cat with mild special needs - such as a missing leg or eye. My son on the other hand thinks I should get a pure breed cat such as a British or Ragdoll that are known for docility and liking their feet on the ground. So any owners of one eyed cats, British or Ragdoll - how are they at hunting?
     
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  2. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Hello @Plumduff (great name!) and welcome :)

    Of the many cats I've shared my life with over the years, my 2 British Shorthaired cats, though very sweet natured and affectionate with humans, were the fiercest, keenest hunters of the lot! They were confined to my cat proofed garden for the first 18 months of their lives but managed to catch birds, mice, shrews, voles. The birds would often get caught as they flew over the garden. I have never seen a cat leap as high as my male cat did and catch a bird mid-air as he did.

    My sister used to have Ragdolls, but they were mostly kept indoors or allowed in the garden under supervision, so I doubt they got the chance to hunt the wildlife.

    I wouldn't be sure that a cat with a limb or eye missing is necessarily not a hunter. Cats are amazing at being able to adapt to a physical disability, especially a young adult cat.

    Your safest bet would probably be to adopt an older cat from a Rescue e.g a cat aged 8, 9 or 10, as they may have less interest in exerting themselves to hunt every day. Though this was not the case with my female BSH as she continued to hunt and catch prey right up to the age of 17 before she became too unwell with chronic kidney disease to be bothered any more.
     
    #2 chillminx, Aug 14, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019 at 10:44 AM
  3. ewelsh

    ewelsh PetForums VIP

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    I wish I knew the answer, what ever the breed is, it’s opposite to my nightmare hunter Lottie, 4 mice brought inside in this morning! :Banghead:Banghead Only able to rescue 2.

    My older girl a moggy was NOT ummmm an active girl shall we say, mice could tap her on the nose and she wouldn’t react! So I think it’s the personality too.
     
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  4. Arny

    Arny PetForums Senior

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    I think its mostly down to the cat and not the breed per sa. Having said that ferals I should imagine would have more instinct and perhaps better hunting ability that your average pet cat.
    I watched a programme a long time ago that suggested cats born out on farms and ferals etc brought in more prey and larger prey too than those born in households.

    My one eyed no teeth moggy was one of our worst for bringing things in. We always said that she must have gummed them to death.
    If you got one with a certain disability it may be that the rescue wouldn't want the cat going out, at least not into an unsecured garden.

    I now have two bsh and I have no doubt if they were allowed out one in particular would be a very keen hunter. As is she has to make do with the flies and spiders that dare enter the house.
     
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  5. saartje

    saartje Hallo

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    Our cat Saartje is always bringing us home presents when she decides to go out on the prowl. She does not have any disabilities and she enjoys being indoors and outdoors.

    I am sure cats with one eye can hunt just as good as a cat with both eyes as they adapt.

    Perhaps having an indoor only cat(s) might help that way they don't have access to the great outdoors and don't go hunting.

    Or another option would be to enclose your garden space that way the cat could enjoy the outdoors without hunting.

    Would you perhaps consider these ideas?

    I don't really have any other ideas to be honest.
     
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  6. NaomiM

    NaomiM Love my furry, feathered and finned family

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    My friend had a three-legged cat - he was the fiercest hunter of all her cats, and his disability never seemed to hold him back!

    I think @chillminx 's idea of an older rescue is a good one. Good rescues will be able to give you a good idea of the cat's temperament, which may help, as well as age slowing them down and hopefully making them more keen on staying in with their home comforts!
     
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  7. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    The only way to prevent wildlife coming to harm from cats is to do what I have done and that is to build a run in the garden with access from the house via a tunnel.
    I try where possible to keep wild life safe so couldn't live with the knowledge I was allowing any animal in my care to destroy the life of others .
     
  8. Summercat

    Summercat PetForums VIP

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    Better still than enclosing the garden as wildlife will still get in, is making a run of nice size with climbing frames etc inside. He or she can enjoy the fresh air and sunshine and the wildlife is safe.
    @Psygon has a nice enclosure maybe she can show you photos
     
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  9. Summercat

    Summercat PetForums VIP

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    Cross posted with @buffie
    I think you can do a run without a tunnel though, carry or walk the cat on a harness out to an enclosure
     
  10. Arny

    Arny PetForums Senior

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    Technically animals can still get in a run. My ferrets are in an outdoor enclosure and they've caught things but I'm being pedantic ;) it'll certainly cut hunting significantly.
     
  11. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    Your right of course ,I only mentioned the tunnel as it gives Meeko full control (while I'm in) of whether he goes out or stays in.
    He didn't like his run much before we added the tunnel and now he spends hours out there watching all the birds/mice foxes etc keeping both him and the wildlife safe.
     
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  12. Plumduff

    Plumduff PetForums Newbie

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  13. Plumduff

    Plumduff PetForums Newbie

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    Plumduff[/USER] (great name!) and welcome :)
    Of the many cats I've shared my life with over the years, my 2 British Shorthaired cats, though very sweet natured and affectionate with humans, were the fiercest, keenest hunters of the lot!

    Ha Ha, well I can see that I am barking up the wrong tree in considering BHS as a safe bet. Their chubby smiling faces look like butter wouldn't melt. My granny gave me the nickname Plumduff when I was little.
     
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  14. Plumduff

    Plumduff PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you all for sharing your experiences. I can see by your replies neither pedigree or disability is going to make much difference unfortunately. Perhaps an older cat then as several of you suggested.
     
  15. Jesthar

    Jesthar PetForums VIP

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    I suspect that is your best bet, although there are still no guarantees!

    There are some breeds that are more predisposed to hunting than others if allowed to roam, but I do suspect that may be more to do with general energy levels and intelligence (plus individual personality) than the build of the breed itself - all cats are hardwired to hunt for their supper, but you'll probably find a Bengal generally is better equipped for success than, say, a Persian :) It should be noted that good pedigree breeders will usually have a contract for you to sign stipulating that the cat is to be indoor only, with outside access limited to an enclosed run or walks on a harness and lead.

    Both my cats are mogs, and I suspect both hunt from time to time. I say suspect because Charlie-girl has never brought prey home, either alive or dead, but I have very occasionally found remnants. Lori, on the other hand, prefers to bring her prey home live and squeaking so she has a self-propelled toy to play with. Small mammals I've so far always managed to rescue, but the spiders and moths aren't always so lucky...

    Oddly, although Charlie-girl is much older than Lori (Charlie is 14 and Lori is 6), I've always suspected she's the best huntress, as she's careful and patient and moves stealthily, whereas Lori is an over-enthusiastic tortie nutter with no concept of personal space or subtletly! ;)
     
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  16. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    What about an older rescue cat? My older cats have all massively decreased hunting activities as they get older.
     
  17. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    Whoops - sorry i hadnt read the other responses before posting that.


    My older cats have definitely slowed massively, even though the cat we have now still goes out at night, we very rarely get anything brought in now.
     
  18. cheekyscrip

    cheekyscrip Pitchfork blaster

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    6B068F49-3741-46F7-BB80-E18D0F9FF535.jpeg 7B6CFA45-25B4-462C-BF66-A3F5352F9D4A.jpeg What about Persian or exotic?

    My exotic Garfield is a very placid cat. Like many of those two breeds he likes to watch the birds and think about them...not hunt them!
    He caught few silverfish and flies but no more than that...
    Goes out only few steps from my flat and under supervision.

    Really indoor cat.

    There are Persian cats in rescues , rather common breed.

    Exotics less so but still possible.

    The laziest cats....
     
  19. Plumduff

    Plumduff PetForums Newbie

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    He looks like a very contented boy. Yes I am completely open to suggestions of breeds, as I have limited experience with pure breeds. I have known several Burmese which I found to be intelligent and personable cats but very very skilled hunters. I love the look of Persians and I also like the description of their nature, but must admit that the grooming seems daunting. The Exotic may be a possibility, I love their plushy coat, but as you say they are much rarer than Persians and seem to be bred with more extreme features. I see there is a traditional, non-show version of the Persian known as "doll face". I wonder if the exotic also comes in this type. If so it might be a contender. Garfield looks like a first class cuddle buddy.
     
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  20. Treaclesmum

    Treaclesmum PetForums VIP

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    Or you could go for a British but just keep it as an indoor cat (perhaps with a cat run). Not so much grooming, not such a squishy face and would only hunt toys! (Although I know they can be the greatest hunters if they go outdoors!) But usually a purebred Brit will be placid enough to enjoy indoor life. :)
     
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