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Help I might need to get rid of my dog!

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Kiaya, Aug 29, 2018.


  1. Kiaya

    Kiaya PetForums Newbie

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    My 6 month old American Bulldog is really being naughty! When she is left alone for even a minute she is chewing everything up, it used to be when she was just left in the kitchen when I was at work and she was chewing the walls, cupboards, absolutely anything in site it takes me an hour to clean it up! I have been and daughter advice and she has a kong, fobler, new toys and she has a half an hour run in the morning including doing training. But now I literally went to the toilet this morning come downstairs and everything in site was ripped apart, the bin, a monopoly board, childs toys. She had the run of the kitchen to the garden and this was literally 10 minutes after her morning run. My house mate is now saying if this carries on she needs to leave. Please help me as she is golden when I am in the same room!
     
  2. LinznMilly

    LinznMilly Moderator
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    Hi. Welcome to the forum.

    She's not being naughty - she's suffering from what sounds like severe separation anxiety. :( This is going to take a lot of hard work on your part to put right, and you could do with getting a behaviourist in to help (if you give us your rough location, someone might be able to recommend a good one), but it is worth it. I've included a link below:

    https://www.petforums.co.uk/threads/how-to-help-a-dog-with-separation-anxiety.112552/
     
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  3. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    It would be a very good idea to make sure that all the things you don’t want her to chew, children’s toys etc are either put away or not where she is left. At six months your pup doesn’t know the difference over what she can and can’t chew. If it’s get at able, then it’s hers. Put the bin in another room and anything you want to keep out of reach.

    Have you ever used a crate to keep your dog and anything chewable safe? Settling her down in the crate with a filled Kong to lick out or a tasty chew will keep her occupied until you finish what you are doing elsewhere. It does sound like separation anxiety which will need time and patiece to solve.
     
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  4. labradrk

    labradrk PetForums VIP

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    Management management management.......6 months is a challenging time. You need to manage her environment ALL of the time, making sure she's not put in the position where she is able to chew stuff.
     
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  5. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Most 6 month old pups are destructo-dogs. Make that an AmBull, and you have even more destructive power. Invest in a crate, introduce her to it slowly, teach her to love it, and use it! Also invest in some baby gates, and puppy-proof parts of the house. And yup, clean up, put things away, don't leave anything out for her to get in to.
    Problem is, now she's in the habit of finding treasures all over the house to chew and play with, you're going to have to break the habit with a LOT of management and supervision. She doesn't know not to play with everything and anything, you're going to have to teach that to her. Lots of consistency! A good trainer to help you problem solve wouldn't go amis either.
     
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  6. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    Does sound like severe separation anxiety plus the fact she becoming a teenager, as already been said a good behaviorist may be able to help you.

    Do you take her to any sort for training classes?
     
  7. StormyThai

    StormyThai Moderator
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    This...
    She is a 6 month old puppy so she will make "mistakes"
    How often do you check on her through the night for toilet breaks?
    What have you done with regards to "settle" training...you can't expect a young dog to just accept being alone, we have to teach them that it's ok?

    Crate or pen training will be your friend so that you can keep her safe while you can't watch her and time to invest in a trainer that can give you some 1:1 guidance :)
     
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  8. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    Seriously? So you're now thinking of getting rid of her and passing this onto someone else to sort out?!

    6 short months ago you wanted a dog/puppy. Commitment and hard work is the way forward to shape that puppy into a lovely dog.

    When you get a pup you think 15 YEARS ahead. Not 6 months.

    At least you have come here for advice. I sincerely hope your thread title is an inflammatory one just to get attention and you are going to see this through.
     
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  9. StormyThai

    StormyThai Moderator
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    To be fair most go through the "WTF have I done!" stage when it comes to puppies, sometimes that feeling is so overwhelming that rehome seems the only option, especially if you don't have support readily available.
     
    O2.0 likes this.
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