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HELP - How do I stop a Husky from biting??

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by francham, May 26, 2010.


  1. francham

    francham PetForums Newbie

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    I've got a 4 month old husky, hes pretty good in the main, but our major concern at the moment is biting. Hes pretty mouthy, likes your hand in his mouth to gently chew on - we dont let him do it but he still tries all the same. When he plays he bites too he has a habit of putting his jaw around my wrist, doesnt hurt me but I'm an adult. He does nip as well at anyone who plays with him - only through play no nastiness there at all no growling no nothing, just play. Tonight though he bit my OH round the thigh, hard, again just play no nastiness, and also through hornyness he does tend to lock his jaw round me but I know that is the hornyness coming through. We are starting to think we need to muzzle him but I know that isnt the answer - there must be a way of sorting this out? Please help me!
     
  2. raindog

    raindog PetForums Senior

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    You have to teach him that this is totally unacceptable and you have to do it now!
    Although they are generally the most friendly, non-aggressive dog you could ever hope to meet, a husky with aggression issues is a loaded weapon. The husky's jaw is more powerful than a Rottweiler's - after all, it was developed as a breed in Siberia where, in winter, everything it ate would have been frozen solid.
    There are various methods of teaching bite inhibition, but it must be immediate and effective. One of the most effective ways we have found is when the dog grabs your hand, instead of doing the intuitive thing and pulling your hand away, push it into the dog's mouth, not violently, just firmly. It will soon "spit you out" and, if repeated on each occasion, the dog will soon stop the hand nipping.

    I'm afraid I don't go in much for the modern "liberal no punishment" approach to training so if the dog continues to nip while playing, I would scrag it and tell it very firmly NO. Huskies are desperate to please and if you show your displeasure, they will learn pretty quickly. On the other hand, when it does play nicely without nipping, reward it with a treat or a cuddle.

    Teaching bite inhibition with dogs isn't a luxury, it could save your dog's life.

    Mick
     
  3. Zaros

    Zaros Pet Forums, P/resident Evil

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    I was very much intrigued by your post and ask with interest what the term 'scrag' implies?
     
  4. Mum2Heidi

    Mum2Heidi PetForums VIP

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    Mine is a little terrier so a bit different but as a pup I used a cuddly toy when playing and whenever she used her teeth pushed the toy gently in front of her teeth so that she was chewing her toy. The distraction into a much more fun game seemed to do the trick but they all respond differently.

    Shouting "ouch" seemed to make it more fun. A firm no was either soul destroying and I had a nervous wreck or became confrontational.

    I am sure you will manage to suss out what works for you.
    Good luck:thumbup:
     
  5. raindog

    raindog PetForums Senior

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    Simple - hold it firmly by the scruff (huskies have a thick, furry mane) and tell it NO in a loud authoritative voice.

    Mick
     
  6. Johnderondon

    Johnderondon PetForums VIP

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    What sort of play do you and your OH engage in with him?
     
  7. Zaros

    Zaros Pet Forums, P/resident Evil

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    Thank you for clearing that up. That's what I thought you were implying.

    As owners of Sarplaninacs we can't really afford to have that 'Liberal no punishment' approach. Despite teaching our dogs bite inhibitions at very early ages we realised that it was a fine line we were drawing between not being firm enough and wasting our endeavours completely, or going too far and making yourself an enemy for the rest of the animals days.
    A so called 'expert' in the breed made the very mistake of 'going too far' with one of our dogs almost a year ago (she was 7 months at the time of the incident) and to this day she despises him with a real vengeance and refuses to allow him anywhere near us. In fact he is the only one of our many acquaintances who she will not allow onto our property. The so called 'expert' even admits he went too far and realises now that there is no way to undo his complacency. Just goes to show how you can never really trust an expert. :rolleyes:
     
    #7 Zaros, May 27, 2010
    Last edited: May 27, 2010
  8. francham

    francham PetForums Newbie

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    we mainly play throw and fetch and usually he doesnt fetch so we chase him round which he loves - its like being in the garden with Ronaldo or someone the way he runs circles around us haha. Theres limited tug as we know that can bring out an agression - though can I just say hes not aggressive in the slightest, its just play its just we know we need to stop him from doing it full stop.
     
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