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help dogs destroying house WHILE i'm home

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by camaroyal, Nov 3, 2012.


  1. camaroyal

    camaroyal PetForums Newbie

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    hi i have 3 dogs in total that are in my home, 9 month old rottweiler, 5 months old alaskan malamute which i recently got and a 3 year old rottweiler.

    basically the two younger dogs are wrecking my home but it's when i am there, when i'm gone the mal is crated, the rotty is confined to a room and my other rotty is in my smallish narrow conservatory.

    when i am at home they wreck the house, i work from home so am often upstairs in my office on my computer, they go out frequently through the day and have a 'paddock' size garden to play in. i take them on walks through a nature reserve and also take them into town for walks on a regular basis. they have lots of toys and get treats and chews often. i know about kongs and stag bars etc. they are wrecking my house by chewing the sofas, and anything else they can find, i have alot of stuff in my house which is antiquey style, they pull the cushions all over, i had a throw and i don't even know where it's gone. if there's nothing easy to get to then they get stuff that's high up too, have had a bunch of dogs growing up and i rescue but never experienced dogs wrecking the house.

    i can't leave them outside on their own incase they escape. my young rottty used to beable to go in and out so i think that used to occupy her but then i figured out she was escaping the backyard so have had to stop that.

    any ideas as i can't have them wrecking everything i own. thanks x
     
  2. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    If you can't supervise them, they should be in crates. If you're not in the same part of the house as them, you might as well be out for all the difference it makes.

    You can give them breaks from being crated where you play with them, go for a walk or whatever, then put them back in the crate with a chew or kong and go back to your work.
     
  3. 8tansox

    8tansox PetForums VIP

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    Or, you could alternatively secure part of your garden. I've got two Rotties and once they've had their exercise (which includes lots of mental stimulation too) they're happy to relax at home - and more importantly, they always have been. (They're only 5 and 3.5 years as it is now).

    I would be asking myself how much mental stimulation these dogs are getting, and "up" it. Brain games etc. :)
     
  4. MyLabTyson

    MyLabTyson PetForums Newbie

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    Sounds like one of your dogs "owns" the house and is instigating the behavior. Gotta find out which one it is and "show it who's boss" so-to-speak. You don't have to be mean about it, just draw boundaries, so it knows what it is allowed to chew, and what it is not allowed to chew. I would temporarily move my computer/office downstairs to keep a better eye on them. When one of them steps out of line, address the problem RIGHT AWAY! Don't hit them or anything, just step in between them and what they are trying to play with, and DON'T BACK DOWN. Its an "alpha-male" thing. When they understand that you are in charge, and understand which household objects are under your protection they will leave those things alone.
     
  5. Old Shep

    Old Shep PetForums VIP

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    With respect: that's a lot of ********. It's nothing to do with "alpha-male" things (whatever that may be.)
    Like others have said, your dogs should not be left unattended around the house when no one is directly supervising them. You have 2 babies and one re-homed dog (which is in all probability traumatised by his move. Not your fault, but if you adopt the above poster's methods you will create more problems).

    The 5 month old dog needs 30mins walk a day. On his own. Plus at least 4 one to one training sessions with you.

    The 9 month old needs 45 mins walk. On his own. Plus 2 to 3 sessions of one to one (I'm assuming he will be more "trained" than the 5 month old)

    The re-homed dog needs 2 45 min walks. On his own. I would also incorporate at least as much one to one training as the youngest.

    When they are not training you should adopt Ian Dunbar's method of "house training" to avoid boredom and destruction. You will need 3 separate crates and 3 play pens. Free downloads from his site (including one for "shelter" dogs (dogs who are re homed). You have a big task on your hands. One puppy is a LOT of work, having 2 young dogs like this is foolish (I don't know your circumstances), but adding a re-homed dog-however well intentioned-is crass stupidity.

    Free Downloads | Dog Star Daily
     
  6. camaroyal

    camaroyal PetForums Newbie

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    First of all the 9 month old female I've had since she was 9 weeks old, the 3 year old rottweiler I got a few months ago and the malamute I got a couple of weeks ago. The three year old rottweiler isn't much of a problem apart from he isn't 200 percecent house trained as he lived in a kennel at a pub all of his life up until now, which I'm ok with that it's something I can work with.

    I run a rescue so dogs come and go mostly they are kenneled but having said that we've always gotten rescues in the past whether we already had a dog or not and it's never been a problem. I do think one is possibly feeding off of the other and like I say since my young rotty can't go out as she pleases then she has started the chewing up more things than before which might have no connection but it might.

    Are people saying that I should crate them all day and just let them out when I do? an idea I had was to tie them both up outside on tie outs at least they get to play about and not be stuck in a crate alot. If I did crate them when would I know they could not be crated anymore? I will always crate my mal when I go out no matter what as mals are notoriusly prone to destruction etc throughout their lives and also I have a cat so never go out with out the mal being crated for that reason also but if I was to crate them when I can't watch them then at what point in their lives would I know they could be left out and not destroy everything?

    They got one of my horses passports yesterday and chewed that even though it wasn't blatantly left somewhere for them to get!
     
  7. 8tansox

    8tansox PetForums VIP

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    So I take it you didn't read my post about securing part of your garden then? Or you chose to ignore it.

    I don't think it's fair to crate dogs all the time either, but I did think (and have seen successful results) from securing a section of garden and making it dog proof and friendly.

    I got confused about the dog rescue bit, but to be fair I've got a busy morning and not a lot of time, so I might not have digested the information correctly, but if you run a rescue (?) where do your rescues "exercise" if your garden isn't secure?

    As a Rottie owner myself, I always feel very protective over the breed as I see so many of them being passed around for insignificant reasons, so please forgive me if you think I'm over sensitive, I am. :eek:
     
  8. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Banned

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    OP please ignore the above post, unless you want to escalate the problems. Old fashioned, outdated and discredited theories that do no good to any one.

    One this that is correct though, is move your office downstairs so that they know you are there. Then they will be occupied with you, not each other. And try to secure that back garden so that they cannot escape. If I am out all the time (and you are out to them) I leave the back door open and have never had any problems.

    So there are two things you can do that will solve your problem straight off: move the desk downstairs and secure the garden or part of it. All without showing anyone who is boss:blink:
     
  9. totallypets

    totallypets PetForums Senior

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    I think you've answered your own question here. You being upstairs in your office is the same as you being out of the house. If you aren't there to supervise and stimulate him he'll find his own fun and he's got someone to do it with too.

    If your Rotty was happy when he could have free access to the garden can you make the area closest to the house secure so he can have this freedom again? Crating the Mal for a couple of hours then take a tea break so he gets to come out and play and do a quick training session before he is crated again and you go back to work?
     
  10. camaroyal

    camaroyal PetForums Newbie

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    I would love to secure my 'garden' but it's actually a paddock that is gonna take alot to ever properly/fully secure for dogs especially for the mal if he decides to be a gate/fence jumper type. It's ok atm to the point where as long as i watch them they are ok out there. They all used to be able to go out the front with me but then the two younger dogs started legging it into the crop field. I am gonna try and possibly temp fence it so they can't but that will be a test thing of seeing if they break through it or not so essentially what I'm saying is there is nowhere they can go outside on their own without me supervising. I can't section the paddock off really as I use it for my pony, so if I did it would only be like the small gravel bit. Not sure exactly which way to go about things really, sometimes I wish I just had an old heinz 57 that didn't chew,run off,bark alot, go mad, go potty inside etc but I don't so gotta deal with what I have since that's what I choose. :crazy:
     
  11. goodvic2

    goodvic2 PetForums VIP

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    Totally agree.

    It's not a training issue it's a case of having disrespectful dogs. They know its wrong cause you are obviously telling them when they do it.

    An unruly pack = lack of leadership IMO
     
  12. goodvic2

    goodvic2 PetForums VIP

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    Don't worry.

    If you don't carry a clicker in your pocket all the time you are told you are wrong and you talk bullshit

    Don't be out off by posting.

    Unfortunately there is only one way of doing things on here ;)
     
  13. ouesi

    ouesi Guest

    Can you bring them upstairs with you and have them relax on a mat?
     
  14. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Banned

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    We used to have an old Heinz 57 dog - couldn't even open a front window or he was gone for the rest of the day.

    What about a proper dog run out in your paddock?
     
  15. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Banned

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    Actually I have never used a clicker in my life, though I have seen it done with some wonderful results. I would probably teach all the wrong things by being all wrong with the timing.
     
  16. Phoolf

    Phoolf PetForums VIP

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    What a load of crap, from my memory of the last poll on here the majority of dogs are not even clicker trained, nevermind having a magic clicker in your pocket at all times. :rolleyes:
     
  17. ouesi

    ouesi Guest

    Hey, speak for yourself! My clicker IS magic, it shoots sparkles and rainbows dontcha know :D

    I believe the expression is ad hominem argument?

    Okay, seriously, showing the dog who’s boss or not is irrelevant. Dogs go destructo-dog for a variety of reasons. In this case I’m betting its something along the lines of “if you don’t entertain me I’ll make my own fun”.

    I’d approach this as a management issue. 1. Prevent access to things you don’t want eaten either by crating or keeping the dogs upstairs with you.
    2. Wear the dogs out physically and mentally. A training sessions, good exercise outlets (not over exercise though as then you’ll just end up with a fit dog who needs more and more work to wear out), maybe feed one meal out of a puzzle toy... Lots of ways to stimulate the brain and the couch cushions will be far less appealing.
     
  18. MyLabTyson

    MyLabTyson PetForums Newbie

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    I agree with you on the advice you gave(and a trip to the dog park wouldn't hurt either.). I believe my wording was poor, and made it sound like I wanted the poster to instill fear in the dogs...that was not my intention. I was simply saying that earning a little respect and trust goes a long way. Set boundaries, be nice about it, but stick to them. That is all :p
     
  19. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    No-one suggested crating them all the time. I suggested crating them when they are not being supervised, which a hugely different thing.
     
  20. Old Shep

    Old Shep PetForums VIP

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    Really? I am astounded.

    no one said that. You didn't read my post or follow the links to the FREE download. If you are not willing to even read the advice, you will get nowhere.

    You are not being vigilent enough. You need to take more care.

    You shouldn't have dogs, then.

    for someone who claims to run a dog rescue, you don't know much about dogs.
     
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