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HELP! Black kitten from blue mom and bicolor dad

Discussion in 'Cat Breeding' started by BSHkitt, Feb 5, 2019.


  1. BSHkitt

    BSHkitt PetForums Newbie

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    Hello everyone

    I have a question about colours

    I have a queen who just gave birth and one of the kittens is solid black (n)

    Mom is solid blue (a). Dad is bicolour blue and white (a 03 blue/white)

    Is it possible to have an offspring solid black from this matting?

    Other 2 kittens are almost all white with a small blue spot in the head.

    Thank you in advance for your help! Cheers
     
  2. gskinner123

    gskinner123 PetForums VIP

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    Hello, no, it is impossible. Unless there is more than one sire of the litter or a different sire than you currently believe to be the one.
     
  3. Rufus15

    Rufus15 ~ Orrono Maine Coons ~

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    Blue can sometimes look incredibly dark and deep, and can sometimes be mistaken for black, but you seem very clear the kitten is black. It can't be, unless as above, there are two sires
     
  4. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave PetForums VIP

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    There are a few very, very, very rare ways this can happen. Is this the first litter for both cats?
     
  5. lillytheunicorn

    lillytheunicorn PetForums Senior

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    The short answer is the bicolour cannot be dad. To get white kittens (the tiny spot shows the colour they would be if they weren’t white) they would need to have the dominant white gene; and as it is dominant either parent would need to be white. Both parents are blue therefore dilute and are dd I.e have the required two dilute genes for it to be expressed. This means a dilute to dilute mating will only give you dilute kittens. So dad needs to be a white cat who isn’t dilute under the white.

    There are very exceptionally rare ways to get ‘funny’ coloured kittens out of a mating.
     
  6. Rufus15

    Rufus15 ~ Orrono Maine Coons ~

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    I read it that the kittens are van or high white harlequin, not dominant white
     
  7. lillytheunicorn

    lillytheunicorn PetForums Senior

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    It’s the almost white with a small blue spot, which makes me think dominant white. Even so to be a van or a harlequin you would need two copies of the white spotting gene. Mum being a British blue you would expect a smaller amount of white. @gskinner123 can confirm but I thought you only mated bicolour to bicolour in BSH to increase the likelihood of correctly marked bicolours.
     
    #7 lillytheunicorn, Feb 10, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  8. Rufus15

    Rufus15 ~ Orrono Maine Coons ~

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    No you only need one, but I think a parent has to be high white/harlequin to produce the same?
     
  9. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave PetForums VIP

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    Usually but not always a high white / harlequin / van cat has two copies of white spotting and therefore has inherited it from both parents.

    http://messybeast.com/cat-genetics-basics.htm
     
  10. gskinner123

    gskinner123 PetForums VIP

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    I agree with lilytheunicorn - I made the mistake of not reading the original post properly. It does actually sound like dominant white (with the usual coloured head spot) is being described and not ''high white' bi-colours. Sometimes people mistake colourpointed newborns for "white" but I doubt that's the case with coloured head spot... Just as I very much doubt the sire!

    An 03 bi-colour would normally need to have two copies of the white spotting gene to produce VERY high white kittens but it can be quite random... Sounds highly unlikely anyway with these kittens doesn't it?
     
    OrientalSlave likes this.
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