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Help - aggressive dog bites child

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by hoggie99, Jul 11, 2009.


  1. hoggie99

    hoggie99 PetForums Junior

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    My son got bitten by a neighbours dog last night, after being called in the garden to play, the dog went straight for him, thankfully the trousers he had on were nike shellsuit type and the dog didnt get a grip , only broke skin very slightlty and left nasty bruises- we visited A+E last night, my neighbours are good people and have a young family of their own, but its not the first time the dog has bitten a child, it bit my daughter last year but as she stuck her hands through the fence and i managed to grab her away it only resulted in a scratch, the neighbours are taking action and will no longer have the dog in the front garden, but is this enough? am really stuck on this one as what happens if dog bites again? and i also have to consider taking action against their beloved family pet, its so hard, the dog is a spaniel
     
  2. scosha37

    scosha37 PetForums VIP

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    Oh its a hard one eh..esp if they are good neighbours..:( But i wouldnt like if my boy got bitten i would just to talk to them to get it resovled as it could get worse as it has bitten 2 of your kids.., i would put something around fence to stop my kids hands/finger to go threw the fence and i wouldnt let my kids in there garden until i knew it was 100% safe..she is a mother to she will under stand..
     
    #2 scosha37, Jul 11, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2009
  3. sallyanne

    sallyanne Guest

    I'm sorry to hear your children have been bitten.

    Currently there are no laws to protect any member of the public when they are bitten on Private property,as this happened in the dog owners garden it's highly unlikely any authority will be interested and they certainly can't force the owner to make a decision on the dog.
    Now had this happened in the street you could have reported it for been dangerously out of control in a public place.

    I think you would end up taking out a private case,which could be very costly.
     
  4. Varkhond

    Varkhond PetForums Member

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    You can ask them to maybe keep the dog chained for the few moments your kids are playing with their kids.. The fence thing, tell your kids to stop putting their weiners in there. :D
     
  5. hoggie99

    hoggie99 PetForums Junior

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    they are responsible good people, they have said they will resolve situ, by not keeping dog in front garden and not allowing it to come into contact with other kids other than their own, i hope they stick to this,

    had no idea u could not take action cos dog was in garden, a massive ty cos been trying to look up stuff on this all morning, that does make things easier for me and i will put my trust in the owners,

    tho i still have fear for the next kid that comes along although i know i cant be responsible for everybody
     
  6. hoggie99

    hoggie99 PetForums Junior

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    hi varkhond, thats why i didnt bother too much with the first incident, cos my 5 yr old did stick her fingers thru the fence, luckily i grabbed her away , she suffered only a scratch, i am a massive dog / animal lover and have a gorgeous black lab who has never put a paw out of place, and i know my love for my doggy and i have great compassion with the ownders of this other dog, as they say he is a great family pet but very protective, there is no warning with this dog - no growling or barking he just bites
     
  7. Domoniques

    Domoniques PetForums Senior

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    Hi
    I would say tell them to fence their garden or buy a dog run so if other people go round the dog is locked up not just behind a door that anyone could open.
    if any other child gets bitten it could be a lot worse and I am sure you would feel bad , I would not let my kids go in the house/garden unless it was locked up.
    maybe some dog training
     
  8. clueless

    clueless Banned

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    Found this for you
    https://www.askthe.police.uk/content/Q34.htm

    I personally would be very concerned if it was my child. You have said the dog gives no warning so what happens if the dog gets near your child again or another child in the garden especially when it is going to be kept away. Maybe you should suggest your neighbour to seek out an animal behaviourist
     
  9. sallyanne

    sallyanne Guest

    I think that may be slightly different because of the nature of the guy's Job.

    I found this which is actually true,
    Another child bitten by a dog - Telegraph Blogs

    According to stats 85% of bites happen on private property,so little can be done.
    I would also be concerned about the dog biting,I suppose you could try reporting it to the dog warden saying you are concerned for children in the area.
    There was a little piece in our paper last week saying a toddler had been taken to hospital wiith a nasty dog bite,it named the breed as a ESS.I was suprized as usually these breeds tend not to make the papers.
     
  10. hoggie99

    hoggie99 PetForums Junior

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    my kids will never be in the garden again, i have a view of their front garden from my window and so far they are keeping to their word, i have informed my kids dad as to what happened , i am not sure what his actions will be , a massive ty to everyone that has replied (excellent link) such a difficult situ
     
  11. hoggie99

    hoggie99 PetForums Junior

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    yeah it did happen as my son entered their garden - even though he was invited in by his friend, "rage syndrome" crossed my mind tho after reading further not so sure on that one but it has been known to affect american cocker spaniels but i think this ones just goes overboard trying to protect his family
     
  12. Dundee

    Dundee Banned

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    As they seem to be approachable and trying to be responsible, could you not suggest them seeing a behaviourist and getting expert help about it. Their vet should be able to refer them to a proper behaviourist (beware of trainers who say they are behaviourists as it is a lottery).

    As much as they try to be responsible, with young children, accidents (leaving doors open etc) can happen, so it would be better to try to solve the problem rather than just contain it.

    Slightly off topic and not saying it applies here, but it does concern me that attitude that is OK for a dog to protect it's 'family' or that it is natural behaviour. Yes, it may be natural for a dog to be protective, but I do not allow mine to develop their protective instincts at all. It is an accident waiting to happen. I am the boss and I do not need mine to protect me - by allowing a dog to be protective you are allowing them to make decisions about who is safe and who is not and giving them the control.
     
    #12 Dundee, Jul 11, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2009
  13. clueless

    clueless Banned

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    Thanks Sal
     
  14. Nicci

    Nicci Guest

    There could be a new amendment to the DDA so it is in their best intrests to tackle the problems they are having with this dog NOW!

     
    #14 Nicci, Jul 11, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 11, 2009
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