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Help 12 week old beagle is a monster

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by FranGadd, Nov 18, 2019.


  1. FranGadd

    FranGadd PetForums Newbie

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    Hi

    I have a 12 week old female beagle puppy who literally will not stop biting me she’s drawn blood a few times not just on me but on my mother also, I have tried the yelp trick and also ignoring her but this never seems to work.

    She’s been trying to rip up the stairs carpet and when I tell her no she barks at me and tries to bite me again.

    When we got her 3 weeks ago came from a litter of 9 pups and she was the last one, the house was a bit unclean we realised when by the Friday she had a discharge and also a poorly belly, by the Sunday she was in the emergency vets, her tummy is better but she’s on her 3rd week of antibiotics and she’s been unable to have her vaccinations because of this. I am worried this is why her behaviour has been so bad because she’s stuck in all day and now I’m concerned once she’s allowed out she might attack others,
    Any advice please help
     
  2. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Normal puppy behaviour am afraid. Excited, I want to play puppies do this, and training takes a while to sink in.

    The best thing to do is leave the room if her teeth hit the skin, for about a minute. Rinse and repeat. Yes you will be out the room a lot, yes it will takes weeks but you will get there
     
  3. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    She isn't aggressive, this is just an extension of the boisterous play she had with her littermates but she needs to learn this is not how to play with humans. Some people find a sharp 'ouch' works but it can just ramp up the excitement. Some people find putting a toy in the dog's mouth works, others find the puppy is still more interested in nipping hands. My preferred method is to teach her that teeth on skin equals end of fun. So as soon as she makes contact, walk out of the room for a few moments. As long as the whole family is consistent - do it immediately and do it every time - she will learn. You could use a house line to draw her away, which keeps your hands both out of reach and also keeps hands for only good things.

    At 12 weeks though, you now only have a short window of opportunity to socialise her before her socialisation window closes. There is no reason why you can't carry her out, in a carrier or tucked into your jacket. As long as she isn't on the ground she will be safe. And remembe socialisation is not about everyone and every dog meeting her. Think quality, not quantity. Letting all and sundry (people and dogs) near a puppy can be overwhelming and frightening - the opposite of what you want. Control the socialisation by being selective, especially with other dogs and kids. Look for calm role model dogs, and adults and children who can be trusted not to get over excited. Socialisation is not about plunging your puppy into every new experience, but rather allowing her to see, hear and get used to people and situations calmly and from a safe position.
     
    adamantis, FranGadd, O2.0 and 4 others like this.
  4. Maurey

    Maurey butler to a spoiled kitty

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    If you're concerned about taking your pup out due to a lack of shots, you could always ask a friend or family member to bring their dog or puppy with up-to-date shots over to your house, as long as you're all certain the dog has no symptoms of illness. That's probably the lowest-risk way to socialize. Overall, I honestly agree with Joanna. Very very much typical beagle puppy behavior, you just have to keep at training. Beagles are very smart dogs, and they tend to be very food-motivated. You can use that to operant condition (i.e. clicker train) your pup into not biting, or mouthing gently if you're willing to have that in your lives for the rest of the pup's life. You could definitely take her outside in controlled conditions if you don't have a family member or friend with a dog you think would be safe around your pup.

    I helped train my aunt's Beagle pup, and it went pretty easily. He went from chewing drywall and shoes and furniture to redirecting his attention to play and chew toys. Make sure you have chew toys with a lot of different textures available -- puppies can be picky, and just not like the mouth feel of some toys. Redirect her chewing from you or your furniture to an appropriate toy, and praise when the pup takes the switch like a champ. Praise even more when pup gets excited, and, instead of going to bite/chew you, or your furniture, she goes to chew one of her toys. It very well could be a lot of this behavior stems from being unable to go out and run off all her energy. You can try and remedy this by high-energy playtime interspersed with basic training. For example, if you're playing fetch, after she brings back the ball, make her sit still and wait for a few seconds before you throw it again. Or if you're playing tug, once you win, get her to do a command, and wait a bit before playing again. If your pup has to think about a command, or wait, and really try at it, the mental stimulation and exertion will help her get tired a lot more quickly than she would otherwise. Also, puzzle feeder toys can help a good amount, as do kongs, though the latter is mainly to help direct safe chewing, rather than engaging the brain.
     
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  5. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    Sorry to be pedantic but socialising your puppy is NOT just about meeting other dogs. There is a good checklist here

    https://www.whole-dog-journal.com/puppies/the-puppy-socialization-exposure-checklist/
     
  6. Maurey

    Maurey butler to a spoiled kitty

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    Wasn't intending to imply it was! It's better than nothing at all, though, as many aren't willing to 'risk' any kind of socialising till their pup has their shots, even the safer route of bringing aspects of socialization TO the pup -- you can expose them to quite a large amount of things by simulating situations at home. You'd be surprised the number of dogs I've known that hadn't seen other dogs till they got their delayed shots. It wasn't fun.

    Obviously, not fully socializing is hardly ideal, but there are people that would never take their unvaccinated pup to the park, so something is better than nothing. I definitely agree that exposing the pup to the widest range of things possible is best, and the easiest way to do that is to take them out in a carrier, or while carrying 'em, if the owner is willing to take the perceived risk of infection.
     
    FranGadd likes this.
  7. puppymadness

    puppymadness PetForums Senior

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    Regarding socialisation we had Luna at 10 weeks, on day 3 she broke her leg and was on strict rest for 6 weeks and 5 min walks for a further 2 weeks. The vets were brilliant when we took her for check ups they would let her meet one of their dogs and she had nose to nose with dogs when in for treatment. We would carrier her round the garden centre/ pet shop. And would take her on a walk just carrying her to get her used to the world and noises outside. Like other people said it's quality not quantity.

    Puppy biting is hard work, Luna was awful you couldn't touch her without being bitten. I found with both Luna and Bella the yelping seemed to excite them. What we did is stop play and redirect, they often do it because they want to play so we would always have a tuggy toy by us so she learnt to play she needs a toy. When her mouth came into contact we would stop play, they soon learn :)
     
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  8. FranGadd

    FranGadd PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you so much for the advice its much appreciated :) I will try and follow it the best I can.
     
  9. FranGadd

    FranGadd PetForums Newbie

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    She is amazing with people when she first meets them, but then its like hello hands I like to bite you :( she goes out into the garden every half hour as she being trained to pee outside about 90% trained she can sit, lay down, give paw and roll over and does so very well, we have all sorts of toys for her different sizes textures etc but she still wants to rip the carpet up and chew the sofa and when you say no she barks and bites you, the vet recommended her to stay away from other dogs as she has vaginitis and on antibiotics.
     
  10. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    the word no is quite meaningless to a puppy - and it's also quite hard for dogs to understand a negative (try NOT to think of a pink and green striped flying elephant, what's the first thing that pops into your head). Instead of trying to stop her doing things you don't want her to do, it's far easier to try to ask for a behaviour that you do want as an alternative.

    And even if she is not directly in contact with other dogs, you should still carry her out and about before she reaches 16 weeks and her socialisation window closes.
     
    Lurcherlad and lullabydream like this.
  11. FranGadd

    FranGadd PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you so so much, I had my last dog 17 years and her behaviour was amazing but I didn’t train her because I was 5 when we got her my mum did it all, I’m now 29 and got my first dog of my own so it’s scary that you’re doing things wrong x
     
  12. foxiesummer

    foxiesummer PetForums VIP

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    They do settle down, honestly. You may have to wait until they about ten years old though. Just kidding. This is my lot. all together now (2).jpg idding. Enjoy. This is my lot.
     
  13. FranGadd

    FranGadd PetForums Newbie

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    Omggggggg they’re adorable I hope so we have tried all of the above the time out and the toy distraction seem to work so me and my family have all agreed that’s what we will stick to xxx
     
  14. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums VIP

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    It's really easy to get so frustrated with something like toy distraction "not working" that you just give up, but you might be giving up RIGHT at the moment the pup starts to grasp what you're asking of them. Be patient, keep going and don't wear thin clothing ;)
     
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  15. DanWalkersmum

    DanWalkersmum watching the world go by

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    Brilliant picture, I just spent ages working out how many dogs (eight?) They look so cosy in there.
     
  16. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Your pup can meet all the fully vaccinated dogs you can find. Hope the plan cracks the puppy biting, it should do.
    I'd go easy on roll-over as a trick for now. It's quite tough on the spine which is still forming, bones still soft. Avoid 'beg' for the same reason.
     
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