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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there are a number of breeds which do not have reccomended health tests according to the kc, but many of their breed clubs do reccomend tests.

Can anyone do me a list of breeds which have either no known or very few known health problems?

I thought it would be interesting, as we often talk about the health tests required, it would be good to see the breeds which dont have alot of those problems.
 

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German Shorthaired Pointers are a very healthy breed:thumbup:
Although they can be a bit accident prone.
 

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Greyhounds have very few problems, as a big dog, like with any other, bloat can occur though. Ex-racers are more prone to osteosarcoma, and dental problems but I'm guessing that hounds that have not been used for racing are not so affected.
 

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I would of said the sighthounds as a group are pretty healthy. Unless you count running head long into fences and walls a genetic problem!!LOL:rolleyes:
 

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English Shepherds are very healthy and long-lived, because they are not very interbred, and most often only the best working dogs are bred from.
 

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Beagles have no recommended health tests and are generally fairly healthy. Apart from overeating hehe.

There are cases of Meningitis in young beagles which is currently being researched.
 

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I would say basenji's are pretty healthy! :D They can get fanconi and PPM but compared to a lot of other breeds they are very healthy. They have no KC recommended health tests. Selective breeding has kept them healthy too, like the english shepards, over in Africa only the best workers would be bred from and im told any with undesirable traits (eg aggression and obvious health problems) end up in the cooking pot! :D

Pugs are also a much healthier breed than people make out. The only genetic problems then can be prone to getting are hemivertebrae and HD. Any other problems are bred in by people breeding poorly, or for exaggeration :) They have no KC recommended health tests.
 

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Beagles have no recommended health tests and are generally fairly healthy. Apart from overeating hehe.

There are cases of Meningitis in young beagles which is currently being researched.
Beagles ARE a generally healthy breed if obtained from a competent breeder - not foolproof though. A good friend of mine had to have her Beagle put down at the age of 6 due to Amyloidosis. She had had a lifetime battle with food allergies with him as well. These conditions are listed as Beagle Health Concerns on a pet insurance site.

More Common Conditions:
- Cherry Eye
- CPRA-Central Progressive Retinal Atrophy
- Epilepsy
- Glaucoma
- Hip Dysplasia
- Intervertebral Disc Disease
- Patellar Luxation

Less Common Conditions:
- Amyloidosis (leads to organ disfunction)
- Cataract
- Deafness
- Demodicosis
- Distichiasis
- Hemophilia
- KCS-Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca
- Umbilical Hernia

https://www.trupanionpetinsurance.com/BreedGuide/Dog/Beagle

Pugs are also a much healthier breed than people make out. The only genetic problems then can be prone to getting are hemivertebrae and HD. Any other problems are bred in by people breeding poorly, or for exaggeration :) They have no KC recommended health tests.
Just some additions here of conditions that can be a problem in Pugs. These are things breeders should be watching for and keeping record of in their breeding stock and relatives.

- On OFA the Pug dysplastic rate for HD is 68%
- Pug Dog Encephalitis is another genetic problem this breed is prone to.
- Dry Eye Syndrome or Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS) is a serious potentially blinding condition that Pugs suffer from.
- Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (coxa plana or LCP Disease)
Portosystemic Shunt (PSS)
- Patella Luxation
- Brachycephalic Syndrome
- Elongated Soft Palate
- Entropion
- skin issues
- This is another breed in which breeders must watch for Syringomyelia as there are affected members.
- Stenotic Nares
- Cleft Palate
- Liver shunt

I find the pet insurance sites are often good to go to for the low down on potential health difficulties to watch for in breeds. This is a link I sometimes work from.

https://www.trupanionpetinsurance.com/BreedGuide/Dog-Breeds

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Mongrels? LOL

They say that true mongrels have way less potential health problems than pedigrees!

My own dog (a bouvier) is meant to have a few potential health issues, but so far, judging by him and his parents, things are looking good. I guess I'm lucky that I have a fantastic breeder (Mon Cher Kennels) who really does consider the health and temperament when selecting a sire and dam.
 

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Tollers are healthy. There are DNA tests for PRA and CEA, so these should be wiped out soon. Breeders hip score and elbow score, but HD/ED isn't a problem in the breed. The only real issue are immune problems, including SRMA. And even that is quite rare. Tollers usually live to over 12 years, 14 is not uncommon.
 

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The Briard

Only, Hip Dysplasia and CSNB night blindness if both parents are tested there should not be a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks guys!

Comfortcreature thanks for the list, i was under the impression pugs certainly had more health problems than mentioned, but didnt realise it was so many!

Classix, the true heinz 57's seem to becoming rarer than hens teeth nowadays. I cant remember the last time we had a true heinz into rescue. Most are usually first or 2nd gen crosses which are fairly easy to see which breeds went into them.

Jackie? i assume you mean the old fashioned JRT rather than the parsons? I'm sure ive read somewhere about certain health tests being reccomended... wish i could remember, perhaps it was the AHT who were doing research? *shrugs*


Do paps not suffer from similar conditions to the chi? epilepsy, patella luxation etc?

Great list though guys, keep em coming :)
 

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Classix, the true heinz 57's seem to becoming rarer than hens teeth nowadays. I cant remember the last time we had a true heinz into rescue. Most are usually first or 2nd gen crosses which are fairly easy to see which breeds went into them.
I always read this about dogs in the UK where the mutt seems to have all but disappeared. We still have a decent number here in Alberta. In all my rescues, previous, I've rarely had a dog I could identify as a mix of one or another - but could usually put a rough type onto them. My current oldie (17) is a Husky from Yellowknife, NWT. The demographic here is very different from the UK. As compared to Alberta you have 17 times the population and less than half the space! I think I"d feel very crowded.

I just made this comparison map, so have to post it.:)



Back onto topic, Papillons do suffer from similar problems to Chihuahuas (hypoglycemia, slipping knees, epilepsy) but if you are to compare these two to many of the small breeds, they are still generally long lived and healthy. I've read mentioned that Papillon teeth can be problematic and need extra care.

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