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Gypsy Vanner Young Horse

Discussion in 'Horse Riding and Training' started by Patsyb, Jun 21, 2010.


  1. Patsyb

    Patsyb PetForums Newbie

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    Hi everyone, can anybody help with my dilemma.
    I have found the horse I am looking for ploddy, steady safe and quite sane but everybody keeps giving me different information. He is only four but i have seen examples of him in really heavy traffic, doesn't bat an eyelid, loads like a dream, not bothered by farm machinery etc etc but certain people say that they are usually like this when young but can change drastically by the time they are six or seven, turning into a veritable fruit loop, is this always the case?
     
  2. momentofmadness

    momentofmadness PetForums VIP

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    The same can be said about any four year old.. I did know of a lot of four year olds coming from Ireland and cause they do things slighlty diff to us they did tend to be very calm etc....

    Is there a reason you are after a four year old.. You will need to keep up with his education to keep him on the straight and narrow...xxx
     
  3. Acacia86

    Acacia86 PetForums VIP

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    A Gypsy Vanner?? I LOVE these horses, always have!!! So so beautiful!!

    Sorry i have no advice, i guess like MOM has said it CAN happen to any young horse. BUt i hope it all works out perfectly for you and your horse.

    Can we have a photo. Pleaseeee!! :lol:
     
  4. Patsyb

    Patsyb PetForums Newbie

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    I would have preferred something older but have been looking for a long time, this was the only one that I have seen with a 40' artic whizzing past his nose with only a slight step back.
    I have lost my confidence with a horse before today and this one looked ideal.
    I do have a secret weapon in the guise of two friends who are much better riders than me and won't put up with any naughtiness, I thought a combination of all three of us would be good to keep him on the straight and narrow.
    Do all youngsters become challenging? Or is there a slight chance my boy would stay the same?
     
  5. Acacia86

    Acacia86 PetForums VIP

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    I am not sure on statisics. But i do know of a couple of people where i am from that have had youngsters and never had a problem.

    But i am not sure on the matter as a whole. Sorry i can't be more help.
     
  6. momentofmadness

    momentofmadness PetForums VIP

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    All comes down to discipline,

    (what are you gonna let it get away with... Prob nothing but some people aren't strong minded and little things sleep and they get bigger and bigger creating an eejit of a horse..)

    Then there is feed..


    (Don't overload it with feed, only feed it what it needs and unless your in real work.. eg; competions every weekend, stay away from Haylage... )

    Don't bore it...

    (Its a youngster so its mind will need stimulating)

    If you can keep it on the straight and narrow and the three of you agree on methods I see no problem..

    But I aint met the horse and therefor I couldn't say anything else..

    Are you having it vetted?

    And have you tried it more than once...
     
  7. tosca

    tosca PetForums Member

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    I was once on a yard where a lot of these horses passed through, and generally they have wonderful temperaments, as long as they are not overfed and have some sort of stimulation, same as any horse. A horse that is good in traffic is a must on today's roads (especially with sat-navs sending lorries down roads they have no right to!)

    Hope this turns out OK for you, and don't be too proud to ask for help if needed.
     
  8. Patsyb

    Patsyb PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for all your help and advice on this one. I think it would boil down to time and experience in the long run. As I work 5 days a week + run a home not to mention being a novice rider, maybe I ought to keep looking for a while longer.

    It's just he is so lovely and sane and steady at the moment I wish I could be more confident he would stay that way, best put my dream back in the cupboard again...............:(
     
  9. JSR

    JSR PetForums VIP

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    Don't count him out yet. I bought my horse as a 5 year old from Ireland..turned out he was 3 (if that) but didn't matter one jot to me. Okay yes he was a 'problem' horse but certainly nothing dramatic and when they tell you an Irish horse is good in traffic they mean FANTASTIC in traffic. My lad can have a lorry, bus and tractor up his arse and he'll let them pass 1 foot away without looking. That to me is worth thousands of pounds!!

    At 5/6 he did have a few mad moments but I doubt that was he age it was more likely he'd got used to me and because I'd started riding him at 4 (gave him a year off and rebacked him because no way was I riding him when I learnt his true age...unlike some people I believe 4 and over for riding horses). I know for a fact he'd been hunted in Ireland, driven and jumped all which I was horrified at learning at his young age but it certainly has given him 'balls' and I have great fun on him doing XC and jumping because he's as brave as they come, never refused anything (well unless I've wimped out and told him too!!).

    I've had my boy 6 years now and wouldn't change him for the world, he'll be with me til the day he dies (or I do!) and I'd have absolutely no hesitation buying again directly from Ireland...in fact already looking for a baby to bring on. :D
     
  10. Patsyb

    Patsyb PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks, I have a lot of good feedback re this one. So that's it minds nmade up I'm going to see him on Tuesday.

    Fingers crossed

    Pats
     
  11. silly gilly

    silly gilly PetForums Member

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    They are usually brilliant in traffis as they tether them next to the road, I wouldnt be put off by his age necessarily. I do love them, my oh lies bloods but give me one of these any day. Loads of work keeping their feather nicelol
     
  12. Patsyb

    Patsyb PetForums Newbie

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    Any tips on this area would be gratefully welcomed. Looking forward to going to see him now.

    Also spoke to a friend at the local BATA and she said the same. If he's like that now she can't see any reason for him changing, hers horses didn't.
     
  13. JSR

    JSR PetForums VIP

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    How exciting for you!! Remember your camera I'll want piccy's!! :thumbup:

    I find keeping my lads feathers, mane and tail really easy. I rarely wash his legs because I believe the natural oils work better than any products I could put on!! I do check his feathers daily when cleaning his hooves, just run your hands through them to make sure no cuts, cracks etc. I use Coat gloss and mud repeller | Fly Away on his mane and tail. Absolutely fab stuff and only need to use it once or twice a week and it keeps everything easy to groom and nice and shiney.

    Also invest in an Oster Mane and Tail brush, around £10 but honestly the best brush you'll get for thick manes!! And Sudacrem by the bucket load!! I use it on any dry skin, cuts or grazes.

    Not that you asked but here's my hairy fella to show you how much mane and feather I have to work with!! :lol: (Ignore lard arse owner...I'm just learning XC!!!)

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Jess2308

    Jess2308 PetForums VIP

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    I have a 4 yr old friesian that I just backed at the beginning of the year. She is VERY safe and sane, probably the calmest horse I have ever ridden. She has been 100% bombproof on the roads so far which is impressive when you consider our hacks have included dual carriageways, riding over and alongside the motorway and also riding alongside a railway track. She has taken it all in her stride and I am confident that she will continue to behave this well. I would never discount a horse on age, either for being too young or old. You will know if he is right for you :D
     
  15. silly gilly

    silly gilly PetForums Member

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    ahhhh JSR I love, love, love your boy,:thumbup: When u go to see this horse dont seem too keen cos they will normally do a deal with you.
     
  16. JSR

    JSR PetForums VIP

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    :eek: Thank you. Did I tell you I am looking for another?? :lol: 6 month old Cydesdale or Shire cross...male pref but not really bothered!! Soooo excited but not rushing into anything cos needs to be the right one...I don't do buying and selling horses on a whim so when I buy it's for life so with something that big I want to make sure it's right!!!
     
  17. Midori

    Midori PetForums Newbie

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    I find all young horses hit the 'terrible teens', but they settle again if they are handled firmly but fairly.

    Cheers, Midori
     
  18. Patsyb

    Patsyb PetForums Newbie

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    Hi All,

    Thanks for all the help and invaluable advice on this one. I did go and see him on Tuesday. He was as he was described and lovely and ploddy. As I suppose with all young horses he did have just a couple of things which would need some work on, but nothing major. After deep thought where I had to take note of my head and not my heart decided that I didn't think I would have had the time to bring him on in the way he deserved so decided not to buy.
    The lady who was selling him, Liz from Pocket Nook Farm at Lowton was wonderful. She let us try him in all ways to make sure we were happy. I know dealers get bad press but if they were all like Liz and her daughter Katie buying horses would be a breeze, hats off to them.
     
  19. shortbackandsides

    shortbackandsides PetForums VIP

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    i think you did the right thing,a youngster needs a lot of time and work,dont forget to get a full vetting done before you buy in the future;)
     
  20. JSR

    JSR PetForums VIP

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    You definately have to go into horse buying with a level head because it can go so wrong. At least you know there is a good seller out there and when the time is right you can contact her again and hopefully she'll have something that suits you.
     
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