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Guilty! What do you think?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by shibby, Mar 30, 2011.


  1. lilacbabe

    lilacbabe PetForums Member

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    How can you tell as every dogs smile is different just like humans facial expressions. Some people smile like they are sneering and being a bit sarcastic but they are not its just the way they look when they smile .

    I am forever being told that I have given a dirty look but I havent its just my face :D
     
  2. shibby

    shibby PetForums VIP

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    I'd never want my dogs to feel uncomfortable. We try to use positive reinforcement methods as opposed to positive punishment (e.g. smacking/shouting at), negative punishment (take away something nice) and negative reinforcement (take away something nasty). Positive reinforcements includes:

    Reward wanted behaviour – encourage and reward behaviour you do want, so that your dog is likely to repeat it in the future.
    Ignore unwanted behaviour – don’t bring any attention to the behaviour and it may disappear. For some dogs, ‘nasty’ attention such as a ‘telling off’ is just as rewarding as positive attention, especially if it is the only attention he gets.

    Avoid situations where the unwanted behaviour may occur – the less an unwanted behaviour is practised, the less likely your dog is to do it again. Obviously, if you can completely avoid situations that are likely to provoke an unwanted behaviour you’ll probably never see it again! Where unwanted behaviour cannot be ignored or avoided, train an alternative, acceptable behaviour for your dog to perform. Because your dog feels driven or motivated to do something (i.e. the unwanted behaviour) under certain circumstances, it is much easier and effective to train him to do something different that is acceptable to you, than to try to get the behaviour to stop completely. For example, if your dog jumps up at visitors to your house, train a really good ‘sit’ command. Then every time on meeting visitors, ask for this sit, giving lots of rewards (treats and attention) when his bottom is on the floor. This alternative, acceptable behaviour will very quickly replace the unwanted behaviour as long as you and your visitors are consistent.

    What is wrong with punishment and negative reinforcement?
    Even if punishment and negative reinforcement are used ‘correctly’ they can lead to fear, frustration & confusion– followed by behaviour suppression, depression and potentially, aggressive responses – as well as a complete breakdown of the relationship between dog and owner.

    Why is positive reinforcement good?
    Simply because it can’t do any harm and if you get it wrong, the worst that can happen is that it won’t work. Positive reinforcement also has an added ‘invisible’ bonus – your dog will try much harder to please you because a ‘pleasure’ chemical (dopamine) in the brain is released when he gets a reward.


    Source: Dogs Trust fact sheet (Behavioural Problems)
     
  3. lilacbabe

    lilacbabe PetForums Member

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    Thats all very well if you have the knowledge and understand the principles as I do but what about a child or somone who is not so able to train a dog as you do ? perhaps the owner has other family members who have children or elderly relatives even relations with learning difficulties ?
    These methods do work and are fairly new way of training compared with the use of the word "no" or "bad" etc and it is quite hard to tell visitors not to let your dog jump up on them if they encourage the dog to do it because they love the dog and want to make a fuss of it .
    There is nothing wrong with any of these methods as long as abuse and inflicting pain on the dog is not used.
    The video clips are just people telling of their dogs and the dog reacting in a submisive way I cannot see any of the dogs being harmed at all.I also doubt if any of them have any behavioral problems the owners just wanted us to see that their dog has a funny way of reacting to being told off dosent mean they are abused, terrified cowed pets because of their method of discipline.
     
    #23 lilacbabe, Apr 1, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2011
  4. leashedForLife

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    Dogs Don't Do Guilt - an open-letter to Good Morning, America
     
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