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Growling & Barking towards my husband

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Bethany F Neale, Feb 8, 2021.


  1. Bethany F Neale

    Bethany F Neale PetForums Newbie

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    We rehomed a miniature Dachshund from a family around 3 weeks ago - upon settling in his been fine but suffered with a bit of separation anxiety which is understandable as he used to live with another dog. I’m currently 8 months pregnant and the dog have become we think really protective of me - if I’m downstairs and my husband goes upstairs when coming back down the dog will go mad barking, growling and is aggressive we’ve tried everything to stop this and he has even done it once to my little boy who is 5. We have asked the family he used to live with is this normal behaviour and they said they’ve never ever seen this side of him? So unsure as to what we are doing wrong? This was only happening with him coming down the stairs however yesterday my husband got off the sofa and he done the same again it’s getting to the point where we are getting worried and need to nip it in the bud before something bad happens. Any other time he sleeps on my husbands lap goes to him for cuddles etc so really strange and just don’t get why suddenly he will just switch to disliking him or showing aggressive behaviour!? Any help or advice would be appreciated - Many thanks
     
  2. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    It's very possible that this is all part of the process of him settling in.
    Initially he will be very unsure, unsettled, and disoriented. First week or so.
    As he gains confidence in his new home and new surroundings, he may feel brave enough to put voice to his discomfort. I highly doubt this is protective behavior, rather fearful behavior. Your husband disappears and then reappears feet-first. Think about it, stairs are a strange phenomenon from a dog point of view. So the dog barks to alert you that there is something weird happening that he doesn't like. Barking is also to make scary things go away.
    I would reassure him. Have your husband speak to him kindly, let him know "it's me" maybe even offer a treat as he comes downstairs. He might have to just drop a treat near the dog.

    Our little rescue swamp rat dog did the same thing. She was quiet as a mouse for a few weeks and then out of the blue started voicing her opinions on things like the kids putting on a backpack, or taking a coat on and off. We just talked to her, let her know it's okay and went about our business. It took a few weeks but she settled soon enough. The more we reassure her when 'weird' things happen the quicker she settles.
     
  3. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    My dachshunds used to the same, though to be fair I don't think it's breed related, maybe more to do with being small and feeling threatened.
    Our stairs are behind a door so this burly figure suddenly appears and startles them. Speaking to them gently helped and they soon realised it was just daddy and relaxed.
    My female who is timid anyway, still reacts like that if my son is staying which is no more than once a year, like she'd forgotten he was up there.
     
  4. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    My dogs sometimes forget if we have a visitor staying and bark at them as though they have never seen them before!

    I expect with the OPs dog it is insecurity but a bit worrying if she has a baby due soon and a small child. It does not give long for the dog to settle before life changes again with the baby.
     
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