Grouse moor owners want licences to kill Marsh harriers

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by noushka05, Nov 30, 2017.


  1. rona

    rona Still missing my boy

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Messages:
    35,210
    Likes Received:
    16,652
    Still no report anywhere but propaganda sites about this license to shoot Marsh Harriers.

    As I thought, just stirring the shit as usual
     
    bordie likes this.
  2. rottiepointerhouse

    rottiepointerhouse PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2014
    Messages:
    15,700
    Likes Received:
    24,455
    I'm sure the shot grouse are deeply comforted by the fact that they are only shot when their numbers are good enough :rolleyes: And woe betide any AR person who actually films the wrong doing (you know like a totally out of control woman wielding a whip 17 times or the videos of illegal hunting) because that is classed as propaganda by some :Hilarious:Hilarious
     
    #42 rottiepointerhouse, Dec 6, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2017
    CRL, LinznMilly, noushka05 and 2 others like this.
  3. noushka05

    noushka05 Unicorn denier.

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    22,802
    Likes Received:
    13,008
    This is why many of us are campaigning for an outright ban on driven grouse shooting. Every year around the (In)glorious 12th Hen Harrier days are held across the country to mark our protest against this so called 'sport'. Not only is illegal persecution of raptors endemic in the industry but managing of moorland for grouse causes ecological devastation on a shocking scale. Owners of grouse moors are given massive tax payers subsidies, we are paying for all this destruction. All that said, licencing is still better than nothing.

    Here are a couple of very short videos by Chris Packham & Mark Avery on driven grouse moors.

    "The uplands of Britain are massive wildlife crime scenes".






    Heads Up for Hen Harriers Project: total greenwashing propaganda
    https://raptorpersecutionscotland.w...rriers-project-total-greenwashing-propaganda/


    [​IMG]



    We can always count on Rona to defend the indefensible:p
     
    #43 noushka05, Dec 7, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
    MrsZee and Zaros like this.
  4. Zaros

    Zaros Banned From Tesco's

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    19,060
    Likes Received:
    17,236
    Of course, the absolute charm of internet forums is that we can always tell what's exactly at risk and from who.:rolleyes:
     
    MrsZee likes this.
  5. rona

    rona Still missing my boy

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Messages:
    35,210
    Likes Received:
    16,652
    It's absolutely ridiculous to say that Moor owners want to shoot Marsh Harriers anyway. The clue is in the name.......there aren't many Marshes on moorland and also the majority of the few Marsh harriers we have are not based around moors, they are based around marsh (see the clue) ;) such as Norfolk. Kent and Lincolnshire.

    Though there is a small population around Tayside

    Oh, and most in this country are Migratory too, so they aren't here for the winter
     
    #45 rona, Dec 7, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
  6. rottiepointerhouse

    rottiepointerhouse PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2014
    Messages:
    15,700
    Likes Received:
    24,455
    There are plenty of areas of marsh on Dartmoor. Just saying.
     
  7. rona

    rona Still missing my boy

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Messages:
    35,210
    Likes Received:
    16,652
  8. rona

    rona Still missing my boy

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Messages:
    35,210
    Likes Received:
    16,652
    http://news.scottishgamekeepers.co.uk/2017/11/sga-seeks-strengthened-code-for-wind.html

    “The report also said turbines could not be seen as a major cause of missing eagles because no final tag signals were within 1km of a turbine. But we know signals only register a limited number of times per day. Also, when a missing Hen Harrier’s tag’s final signal was found to be on an RSPB reserve, at Insh Marshes, the public were told last signals were only an ‘indication’ of a broad general area the bird was in"
     
  9. rona

    rona Still missing my boy

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Messages:
    35,210
    Likes Received:
    16,652
    http://www.bowlandwildlife.org.uk/?p=9661

    "Martin Harper blogged that trail cameras at Insh Marshes had identified foxes and badgers as being the most likely reason for poor lapwing breeding success at the reserve and went on to state that lethal control of the foxes was being considered as a management option for next year –"

    "We know from nest cameras monitoring breeding HHs in a Skye study area that fox predation was the major driver of HH breeding failure over the last couple of years -"

    " And RSPB trail cameras at Insh Marshes have identified that foxes regularly forage there. We also know that HHs have a high mortality rate in their 1st year (D. Watson 1977, The Hen Harrier). Moreover, as we are all aware, a satellite tag is unlikely to continue functioning after being chewed (along with the prey’s bones, feathers etc) by a fox or badger, and/or after being cached or taken to an underground den or sett, or lying under a carcass with the transmitter shielded by the corpse, vegetation, terrain etc. So, an entirely plausible explanation for this loss of signal would be mammalian predation of a naïve juvenile bird at a fox-rich roosting site or when on the ground with prey."

    "The increased usage of trail cameras has thus unequivocally identified foxes as a major predator of HHs"
     
  10. noushka05

    noushka05 Unicorn denier.

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    22,802
    Likes Received:
    13,008
    Sorry to burst your bubble but Marsh harriers will even nest on moorland. I assume by referencing Rare Bird Alert you yourself believe them a credible source.

    Marsh harriers and nest illegally targeted in North Yorkshire 2017 http://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/v2/C...-eggs-taken-from-moorland.aspx?s_id=508787308
    Armed men were recorded visiting the nest on a number of occasions and are believed to have attempted to shoot at least one of the parent birds before removing the eggs. The RSPB is offering a reward of £1000 for information leading to conviction of those responsible.

    This spring the pair of Marsh Harriers started breeding on Denton Moor near Ilkley in North Yorkshire. This species is typically associated with marshes and agricultural areas in the south east of England. It is rare for the bird to nest in North Yorkshire and this is believed to the first breeding attempt in the uplands of the county for many years.

    Unfortunately, this area of North Yorkshire has a particularly bad history of raptor persecution, with 12 Red Kites known to have been poisoned or shot within five miles of the nesting attempt during the last ten years. Consequently, RSPB Investigations staff had concerns about the safety of the nest so they visited the site under licence and found five eggs. They then installed a camera to monitor the progress of the nest.

    On the 19 May, the RSPB returned to the nest to find all the eggs had gone, though a pair of Marsh Harriers was still in the general area.

    A review of the video footage showed a disturbing series of events, with regular human activity at the site.

    On 17 May the female Marsh Harrier is seen leaving the nest, immediately followed by a volley of gunshots. It is believed this was a failed attempt to shoot the bird. A couple of minutes later, two men carrying firearms walked into the nest site. One of them is seen bending down and, as they leave, a white object - thought to be at least one Marsh Harrier egg - can be seen in his hand










    Mountain Hare facing local extinction
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-41599126


    [​IMG]



    This is like deja vu:rolleyes:. Rona even links you yourself provide state persecution by grouse moors is responsible for the demise of the species. We know the sole reason hen harrier have all but been eradicated is due to this FACT.
     
    MrsZee and Zaros like this.
  11. rona

    rona Still missing my boy

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Messages:
    35,210
    Likes Received:
    16,652
    My links are up to date, not from a decade or more ago
     
  12. Zaros

    Zaros Banned From Tesco's

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    19,060
    Likes Received:
    17,236
    noushka05 likes this.
  13. rona

    rona Still missing my boy

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Messages:
    35,210
    Likes Received:
    16,652
    Then there's all those moorland owners that won't let the RSPB anywhere near a HH nest because the stupid idiots actually advertise the nests to the foxes :rolleyes:
     
  14. noushka05

    noushka05 Unicorn denier.

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    22,802
    Likes Received:
    13,008
    In case you missed this earlier.https://raptorpersecutionscotland.w...rriers-project-total-greenwashing-propaganda/ I don't expect you to look objectively at Raptor persecution blogs analysis of 'heads up for hen harriers project' with you very much in favour of game bird shoots.

    Heads Up for Hen Harriers Project: total greenwashing propaganda


    It’s that time of year again when the Heads Up for Hen Harriers Project trots out more propaganda in an attempt to greenwash the criminal activities of the driven grouse shooting industry.

    This project began a few years ago and we’ve criticised it many times for being a partnership-working sham (e.g. see here, here, here, here, here). You won’t be surprised to learn we’re going to do so again.

    The idea behind this project is that sporting estates agree to have cameras installed at hen harrier nests to identify the causes of nest failure. This is a flawed idea right from the off. We all know the main reason behind the declining hen harrier population – illegal persecution on intensively managed driven grouse moors – it has been documented time and time and time again, in scientific papers and government-funded reports. So, if you put an ‘official Project camera’ on a hen harrier nest situated on a driven grouse moor, the gamekeepers will know about it and won’t touch that nest (although they’re quite likely to try and bump off the young once they’ve left the nest but are hanging around the grouse drives, away from the nest camera). So if the nest then fails for natural reasons (e.g. poor weather, predation), the Project will only identify those issues as the cause of failure, and not the illegal persecution issue. The grouse-shooting industry will then use those (biased) results to shout about illegal persecution not being an issue. We’ve seen this many times already.

    This year, once again, SNH put out a misleading press release that claimed a ‘bumper’ year for project success, with 37 hen harriers successfully fledging from 7 of the 21 participating estates.

    Photograph from one of this year’s nest cameras:

    [​IMG]

    Sounds great, doesn’t it? And it is, in a way. We have no problem recognising the efforts of these seven estates – they’ve all hosted successful hen harrier breeding attempts and they absolutely should be applauded for their efforts. But, and here’s the rub, not one of these estates is on our radar as being a raptor persecution hotspot and not one of them operates as an intensively managed driven grouse moor. Hen harriers would just as likely have nested on these seven estates even if they hadn’t signed up to be part of the Heads Up Project, so for the Heads Up Project to claim these breeding successes as a Project success is highly disingenuous.

    Several of these estates are managed as re-wilding projects, some of them have low ground shooting/stalking or walked-up grouse shooting and at least one of them has no game shooting whatsoever. The only one that comes anywhere near being a driven grouse moor is Langholm, and given that this is a highly-scrutinsed demonstration project (i.e. no illegal raptor killing allowed), and they’re not shooting grouse there, it doesn’t qualify as an intensively managed driven grouse moor, nor an estate of (current) concern.

    So while SNH and the driven grouse shooting industry are busily trumpeting this as a great partnership success and real hope for hen harrier population recovery, the reality is that illegal persecution on intensively managed driven grouse moors remains out of the spotlight.

    In our opinion this is a total greenwashing propaganda exercise. We expect nothing else from the driven grouse shooting industry but for SNH to be heralding it as anything but a sham is an embarrassment.



    Unfortunately, Hen Harrier Species Champion Mairi Gougeon MSP appears to have had the wool pulled over her eyes. We have a lot of time for Mairi, and appreciate her efforts in using her political status to draw attention to this species’ plight, but have a look at this recent Parliamentary motion, lodged by Mairi but with the Dark Side’s fingerprints all over it:


    [​IMG]
    This motion acheived cross-party support (by no doubt similarly well-intentioned MSPs) and as such will result in a Members Debate in Holyrood a week today:

    [​IMG]

    We look forward to watching this debate (it’ll be available on Scottish Parliament TV – we’ll add a link nearer the time) and we especially look forward to some well-informed MSPs asking some probing questions to expose the Heads Up for Hen Harriers Project for the greenwashing scam that it is.

    You just make it up as you go along. Raptor persecution on grouse moors is on going - it will never stop. Driven grouse shoots are an ecological disaster zone & must be banned.

    :D

    I actually said gamekeepers were aliens. Knew it!:p Either that or pond scum - they're definitely sub human anyway lol
     
    MrsZee and Zaros like this.
  15. noushka05

    noushka05 Unicorn denier.

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    22,802
    Likes Received:
    13,008
    You're taking people for idiots Rona. All this deflection wont work. There is a mountain range of evidence PROVING driven grouse shoots are a sink for raptors. They have almost wiped out our hen harrier with their relentless persecution of this amazing bird.
     
    MrsZee and Zaros like this.
  16. noushka05

    noushka05 Unicorn denier.

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    22,802
    Likes Received:
    13,008
    Britain's relentless persecution of birds of prey revealed
    https://www.birdguides.com/news/britains-relentless-persecution-of-birds-of-prey-revealed

    c813742b-e2ea-4f59-8c48-b4c615b315ba
    The new Birdcrime 2016 – the sole report summarising offences against birds of prey in the UK – reveals 40 shootings, 22 poisonings, 15 trappings and four other incidents of illegal persecution against raptors. Among the victims were Hen Harriers, Peregrine Falcons, Red Kites and Common Buzzards. The evidence suggests these figures are just the tip of the iceberg, with many illegal killings going undetected or unreported, often seemingly through active concealment.

    The report also reveals that 53 (close to two-thirds) of the confirmed incidents took place in England, and raises particular concern for raptors in North Yorkshire. Over the last five years the county recorded the highest number of confirmed bird of prey persecution incidents in the UK, with 54 incidents since 2012 and 19 last year alone.

    The problem isn’t confined to England, with the report highlighting cases in Wales and Northern Ireland, as well as Scotland, where there is growing concern over the repeated very suspicious disappearances of satellite-tagged birds of prey. This year, a study by the Scottish Government examined the fate of 131 Golden Eagles fitted with satellite tags between 2004-16, concluding that: “as many as 41 (one third) disappeared, presumably died, under suspicious circumstances connected with records of illegal persecution

    [​IMG]
    A Golden Eagle is satellite-tagged in Scotland; up to 41 such birds are believed to have disappeared in suspicious circumstances, never to be seen again. Photo: Duncan Orr-Ewing (RSPB).
    Increasingly, people in Britain are being robbed of the chance to see these spectacular birds because of these illegal incidents, yet in 2016 there wasn’t a single prosecution arising from a confirmed incident – the first time this has happened in 30 years.

    Martin Harper, RSPB Conservation Director, said: “Birds of prey bring our skies to life. There is nothing like seeing a diving peregrine or a skydancing Hen Harrier. The sights of these spectacular birds are something we should all be able to enjoy, [but] unfortunately illegal activity is stopping this and preventing the birds from flourishing. There are laws in place to protect the birds but they are clearly not being put into action. We need governments across the UK to do more to tackle illegal killing to protect our raptors for future generations to enjoy.”

    [​IMG]
    A gamekeeper in Mossdale, North Yorkshire, walks away, having just reset one of several pole traps at the site. Photo: RSPB.


    Previous research has shown that illegal killing of birds of prey is associated with land managed for intensive driven grouse shooting, leaving vast areas of our uplands devoid of raptors.

    A Natural England study revealed “compelling evidence” that the persecution of Hen Harriers associated with driven grouse moors was the main factor limiting their recovery in England.

    Bob Elliot, RSPB Head of Investigations, said: “This latest Birdcrime report highlights that we have a major issue in the UK with birds of prey being deliberately and illegally killed, despite having full legal protection. This type of crime has serious consequences for the populations of species, such as Hen Harrier, and we must see a change in attitude and more effective law enforcement to protect these birds for years to come.”

    The RSPB believes the introduction of a licensing system for driven grouse shooting would help tackle the ongoing illegal persecution that occurs on the moors. This would also help tackle the wider problems of intensive management of ‘big bag’ driven grouse shooting, like the draining and burning of fragile peat bogs. A fair set of rules in the form of a licensing system could help ensure shoots are operating legally and sustainably, and introduce the option of restricting or removing a licence in response to the most serious offences, such as where staff on an estate have been convicted of illegally killing birds of prey.

    The RSPB has welcomed a recent announcement by Scottish Government that will see an independent panel established to review options for regulation of grouse shooting and to look at the economic and environmental costs and benefits of the industry.

    A full copy of the Birdcrime 2016 report summarising the extent of illegal persecution offences against birds of prey in the UK, can be downloaded here.
     
    Zaros and MrsZee like this.
  17. Jonescat

    Jonescat Don't do nothing. Do something.

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2012
    Messages:
    6,365
    Likes Received:
    4,392
    I see Marsh Harriers often, and mostly out of the breeding season, and not in the areas listed above. They seem to have two habits now - one to move from breeding grounds to wintering grounds with good feeding in the UK, and one to move through the Med to North Africa. It has been suggested that this may be to do with climate change, which wouldn't be surprising as a lot of birds are changing their traditional habits apparently for the same reason.

    Intensive farming and the lack of tolerance of hen harrier nests in crop fields is a problem here. They still nest in cereal fields in France, where they grow taller crops. There are a lot of factors, but it appears undeniable that a great many disappear on grouse moors.
     
    Zaros, MrsZee and noushka05 like this.
  18. noushka05

    noushka05 Unicorn denier.

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    22,802
    Likes Received:
    13,008
    Habitat loss is the other main factor for the hen harriers demise but there is habitat to support 320 pairs in England. Though they will nest elsewhere they are a moorland specialist bird & as you say its undeniable (to most!) that a great many disappear on grouse moors as persecution of all raptors is relentless on the moors. You're incredibly lucky @Jonescat[/USER ,I have never seen either of these harriers. I don't live far from the Peak District NP nor the North Yorkshire moors for that matter & have never had the privilege of seeing a hen harrier when we've been up there. In fact the only bird of prey I can recall ever seeing when visiting or passing through is a kestrel hovering by the road going over the Woodhead pass. Our uplands should be teeming with biodiversity - they are not.
     
    Zaros and MrsZee like this.
  19. noushka05

    noushka05 Unicorn denier.

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    22,802
    Likes Received:
    13,008
    So yesterday was the Scottish Parliamentary debate. There is a video of the debate on the link, I haven't watched it as yet but here is RPs summary.

    (Well done Andy Wightman one of my enviro heroes:))


    Heads Up for Harriers Project condemned as “greenwashing exercise” in Parliamentary debate


    Yesterday evening saw a Members Debate in the Scottish Parliament as a result of MSP Mairi Gougeon’s recent motion in support of the Heads Up for Harriers Project and the Role of Species Champions.

    The archive video of this debate can be watched here and the official report of the meeting can be read here:

    Heads up for Harriers debate 13Dec2017

    The debate centred on two topics: the role of the species champions and the Heads Up for Harriers Project (HuHP). For the purpose of this blog, we’ll just be focusing on the HuHP – that’s not to say the role of the species champion isn’t important – as we’ve blogged before, it’s an incredibly worthwhile initiative and one that we very much support. We are especially pleased that Mairi Gougeon used her position as the Hen Harrier Species Champion to secure this debate – all credit to her, well done.

    [​IMG]


    A number of MSPs spoke specifically about the HuHP and all except one acknowledged that illegal persecution continues to be a threat to the hen harrier and to several other raptor species. The only one who didn’t acknowledge this fact was John Scott MSP (Conservative), who gave a bizarre speech about the lack of fox and “vermin” control on FCS land and suggested that this played a part in the decline of the hen harrier population. He obviously hasn’t been told that just across the Scottish border at Kielder, the ONLY successful breeding pairs (x 3) of hen harriers in England this year were on, er, FC land.

    He went on to say, “Notwithstanding the alleged predation of hen harriers by land managers, I still believe that the safest place for hen harriers to raise chicks is on well-managed grouse moors“. Dear God.

    John Scott’s parliamentary colleague Donald Cameron (Conservative) (and the Species Champion for the Merlin) was far better informed, although he did say, “There has been much criticism of people in the grouse industry who actively persecute birds of prey. I think that we all acknowledge that grouse shooting is an important industry for the rural economy of our country. The vast majority of land managers, whether they are owners or employees, use sustainable environmental management practices to a high standard and operate within the law. It is important to note that many estates carry out measures to conserve and preserve raptor populations“.

    We agree that some estates do “employ sustainable environmental management practices to a high standard and operate within the law“. We heaped praise on one of them quite recently (see here). But it’s quite clear from the scientific data on several raptor species (e.g. hen harrier, golden eagle, peregrine, red kite) that there are still a large number of estates that do NOT operate within the law, and those landholdings just happen to coincide with areas intensively managed as driven grouse moors.

    We’re not talking about the odd nest failure here and there due to predation or poor weather – these are natural causes of failure that you’d expect from time to time, and everybody acknowledges this. What we’re talking about here is the persistent, long-term absence of these species in areas where they should be, and would be, thriving if they weren’t being routinely and systematically persecuted.


    The speeches of two Parliamentary members were the most interesting to us – those given by Andy Wightman MSP (Scottish Greens) and Liam McArthur MSP (Lib Dem). You really do need to read them (and/or watch the video). Both of them pointed out that the HuHP does not address the fundamental issue of tackling illegal persecution because none of the participating estates that have had cameras deployed are known raptor persecution hotspots, nor are they operated as intensively managed driven grouse moors. Andy Wightman went further and said,

    Indeed, I believe that the project is being used as a greenwashing exercise to hide the criminal activities that are undertaken by some in the driven grouse shooting industry and to promote the misleading impression that it is voluntarily cooperating to clean up its act“.

    Bravo


    [​IMG]

    The claim that many of the estates with nest cameras on them are managed as driven grouse moors is an interesting one, and, we believe, is untrue.

    According to the briefing paper from Scottish Land & Estates (SLE), provided to MSPs prior to the debate:

    Up to two thirds of the estates where cameras were installed have been driven grouse moors, indicating a strong take-up where the issue of Hen Harrier decline is most relevant“.

    See SLE’s briefing paper here: SLE briefing Heads Up for Harriers debate_13Dec2017

    Why do we believe this statement to be untrue? Well, we could argue that any information from SLE on raptor conservation issues is quite likely to be misleading. We’ve seen many examples of outright propaganda from this organisation over the years (under it’s own name and also under the name of its subgroups, the Scottish Moorland Group and the Gift of Grouse), e.g. here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here and as a result we don’t trust a word they say.

    But in this case our suspicion is based on more than just a natural distrust of SLE; it’s based on some long-term and painstaking investigative research that we’ve been doing to identify the estates involved in this Heads Up for Harriers Project.

    We are confident that we’ve identified the three estates that had cameras deployed in 2015, the three estates that had cameras deployed in 2016, and five of the six or seven estates (there seems to be uncertainty about the actual number) that had cameras deployed in 2017. We are also confident that NOT ONE of these areas where the actual cameras were deployed is a known raptor persecution hotspot and NOT ONE of them is managed for driven grouse shooting.

    But before we can publish our findings, we need to verify our conclusions. So we submitted an FoI request to SNH and this is what we got back:

    FoI request to SNH: In each year, how many estates had successful nests and of those, how many estates were managed for driven grouse shooting?

    SNH response: 2015 – 2 estates with successful nests, 2 of which were driven grouse moor. 1 additional successful nest 100m off the estate boundary of a driven grouse moor.

    2016 – 3 estates with successful nests, 2 of which were driven grouse moor.

    2017 – 6 estates with successful nests, 3 of which were driven grouse moor.

    FoI request to SNH: Please provide the name of each estate, in each year, that signed up to participate.

    SNH response: We have considered this part of your request very carefully, and we are unable to provide the estate names. Estates enter into the Heads Up For Harriers project voluntarily. The estate name information in this case was provided voluntarily, there are no other circumstances that entitle SNH to disclose it, and the estates have not consented to disclosure. Making the information publicly available would be likely to prejudice the interests of the estates, for example via negative publicity in the event of harriers not nesting on the estate or in the event of nest/s failing on the estate. We are therefore withholding the estate name details under EIRs Regulation 10(5)(f) (Interests of the individual providing the information).

    The Heads Up for Harriers project members’ position is that estate wishes must be respected. Further, members agree the most important aspect of the project is to encourage cooperation and a positive working relationship ‘on the ground’ between estates, Project Officers and other project members to promote survival of hen harriers and enable monitoring if and when hen harriers return to breed. We have therefore concluded that, in this case, the public interest is best served by not releasing the estate names.

    Interesting, isn’t it? As Andy Wightman pointed out in his speech, this is a publicy funded project and yet the names of the participating estates are being kept secret. Why is that, do you think?

    Given the serious nature of our concern that inaccurate and misleading information is being spewed out, not only by SLE but significantly by SNH, to portray this project as a genuine attempt by the driven grouse shooting industry to support hen harriers, we’ll be challenging SNH about its refusal to release information that would either support or refute our suspicions that the Heads Up for Harriers Project is just a greenwashing exercise.

    Watch this space.
     
    Zaros likes this.