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Greyhound mouthing badly

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Frobinson, Apr 12, 2017.


  1. Frobinson

    Frobinson PetForums Newbie

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    Help needed with Dash! Last Thursday while we were playing in the garden Dash jumped up on me (I was sitting in the garden seat throwing balls for him) and he started mouthing me arm. I got up said no and turned my back on him. He took no notice and continued to grab my arm. To be honest he was quite scary as he just wouldn't stop. It seemed like he was out of control, I eventually pushed him off and shouted No bad dog and ran into the house. He followed me in but seemed to start and calm down. I was quite upset as my arm was badly bruised and he'd slightly broken my skin in a couple of places. My husband was none to pleased when he saw my arm either. He says I'm too soft with him and he needs to learn what's acceptable behaviour. I'm continuing with his training by praising and treating good behaviour as everything I'm reading says greyhounds are sensitive and positive reinforcement works best. Tonight he jumped up on the sofa with me (I allow him to) and started the mouthing again! He grabbed the back of my neck, then my arm. I started shouting for him to get off and my husband ran down the stairs at which point Dash ran out into the garden. I locked him out to give him time to calm down for 15 minuted. When I let him in I calmly but firmly told him to lie on his bed in the lounge and when he did I praised him. He's tried to get on the sofa a couple of times but I told him to lie on his bed, where he is now. He's not an ex racer, but I got him from the cat and dog shelter who told me he's 2 years old and previously was with a family for 7 months. Sorry this is such a long post but any help would be greatly received. I've only had him for 10 weeks and love him to bits, but my arm is black and blue and very sore:-(
     
  2. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Saying No, bad dog and raising your voice means absolutely nothing to your dog. Penalising him for something that's in the past ie making him stay in bed, is just teaching him to be in his bed...not why your reasoning for wanting him there.

    Sighthounds are sensitive souls of the dog community, and all dogs learn best by positive training. However what you have shown Dash is none of this, shouting at him may in his eyes just make what he sees as a game more exciting or on the other side of the coin scare him.

    With any dog, no matter if its an older dog who still mouths, or a puppy the best advice is to move away, preferably in another room so you can close the door behind you. Giving the dog a few minutes to calm down. If you enter the room, and it begins again, get up and do it again.

    As an ex racer am guessing the mouthing stage has never passed, all dogs love to play bitey face with one another but usually with puppies, we stop this biting early by simply walking away. In Dash's case this did not happen. So there is no bite inhibition at all, but there will be if you and your husband are consistent and walk away as soon as the mouthing begins. Yes it will be hard, having a greyhound bouncing all over you when you are walking away, and you may get bruised some more it will be worth it.
     
  3. Hanwombat

    Hanwombat I ♥ dogs with eyebrows !!

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    I don't see the difference between mouthing and biting? its still teeth coming into contact with the skin, so it me its just all biting.

    What is Dash doing beforehand to lead up to when he bites you ?
     
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