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Great Dane Puppy & Hip Dysplasia

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Mazie Gordon, Mar 1, 2019.


  1. Mazie Gordon

    Mazie Gordon PetForums Newbie

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    Hi! I just got a Great Dane/ Saint Bernard pup. I'm aware both these breeds are risk factors for hip dysplasia so naturally, I'm paranoid. My puppy is 11 weeks and I've noticed that she does a lot of the symptoms such as frog sitting, Bunny hops, sway walk (I think), crawling up on furniture rather than jumping. Is this just normal awkward puppy behavior or does it sound like Hip Dysplasia?
     
  2. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    Most puppies have an wobbly gait - especially large breeds who often can't control their growing limbs - and even if your pup was at risk of dysplasia it tends to be a wait and watch process at that age. Of course if you are really worried have a chat with your Vet.

    Did your pup come from Health Tested parents? From the breed cross I suspect not? That means that you may have to wait and see how she develops as dysplasia is a combination of nature (that why good parental hip scores are important) and nurture (environmental factors) but there are many things that you can do to help your pup along in this regard.

    Firstly do not let your pup jump on to or off furniture. You say he 'crawls up on to furniture rather than jumping' - don't encourage him to do either. Keep his paws on the floor. Adhere to the '5 minutes per month' walking rule when you start taking him out so that you don't over stress those joints. Don't throw balls or play excitable tuggy games with him as this puts puppies limbs under stress as they try to reach up/race around for the toy. And no steps or stairs.

    He will need regular gentle exercise to build up his muscles as his body grows and keep his weight down. With large breeds the first 18 months is very important.

    I wouldn't worry needlessly though - just enjoy your pup and help her mature gently.

    J
     
  3. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    Great advice above. It is hard not to worry but it is very likely to be normal puppy wobbly gait at this age.

    Puppies joints are very lax and it's impossible to diagnose hip dysplasia at this age. The joints tighten as the skeleton matures. Meanwhile, be very cautious as James says and just enjoy her.

    Importantly DO take out and maintain payments on a good pet insurance policy!!

    Then, when your pup is around 18months, you can have her hips X rayed and, if the hips are dysplastic at least you are covered.

    Take out the policy asap if you haven't already. That's all the advice anyone can give for now I believe. Wait and see.
     
  4. Mazie Gordon

    Mazie Gordon PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you so much, everyone!
     
    tabelmabel likes this.
  5. Woah

    Woah PetForums Member

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    Most puppies are diagnosed between 4 and 18 months so does develop very early on. Just keep an eye out for all the possible symptoms.

    Definitely good advice to get an insurance policy out. I know someone who’s 18 month old dog has just been diagnosed and having both hips operated on - £5000 EACH !!!

    I do believe though that if a dog has bad hips, it’s going to reveal itself sooner or later no matter what level of exercise you do, Although certainly don’t over do exercise to point of exhaustion because injury is more likely then. Hip and joint problems later on from injuries sustained earlier on, so good advise not to be jumping unnecessarily, and not playing on slippy floors etc etc.
     
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