Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Going to see a litter, what to look for??

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Faithy5690, Apr 13, 2011.


  1. Faithy5690

    Faithy5690 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2011
    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hiya, :001_smile:

    I am having a choc lab pup in couple of months and i am going to see the litter that i am hopefully having him from for the first time on saturday. However, they will only be two weeks old and i was just wondering if there is anything to look for? Also i would imagine that they probably are not going to look much different to each other so how do i pick which one?

    :001_smile:

    much appreciated
     
  2. archiebaby

    archiebaby PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Messages:
    5,849
    Likes Received:
    103
    probably not what you want to hear but imo no decent breeder would let people come and view 2 week old pups:( 4 weeks at the very earliest and then at least you have some idea of puppies natures etc and mum would be much more at ease than letting strangers in to see her babies, aside from the chance of infection to the babies which is a great danger at 2 weeks old! sorry but just my opinion ;)
     
  3. astraldream

    astraldream PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2011
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    3
    quite right too.

    I wouldnt even bother with this breeder in case you get attached.
    Look for a breeder that does all the required health tests for the breed.
    You want to see mum and actually see the test results dont take the breeders word for it. You want to know who the dad is, and do research on him. And i would expect to be grilled within an inch of my life on wether i am suitable for the breeders pups.
     
  4. CAstbury

    CAstbury PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,364
    Likes Received:
    48
    I know a few Labrador breeders and not one of them would let people come and see pups at 2 weeks - don't normally let them visit before 4 weeks and prospective owners are questioned thoroughly and have to be approved by these breeders. They then have to visit the pups again before they are allowed to have one.

    Not a case of someone wanting a pup off them - it is a case of the person being suitable to have one of their puppies.

    Just be careful.

    x
     
  5. noushka05

    noushka05 Unicorn denier. Snowflake. Activist ;)

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    26,064
    Likes Received:
    17,675
    have to agree with the others good breeders wont usually let anyone near such young pups.
     
  6. Johnderondon

    Johnderondon PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2009
    Messages:
    1,676
    Likes Received:
    131
    As others have said - unless you have been comprehensively vetted already, you are aware that the breeder has undertaken all the recommended health tests for the breed, you have been on the breeders waiting list for a pup from this litter - the answer to your question...


    The door.

    Have you thought about rescue? Plenty of pups about at the moment.
     
  7. CAstbury

    CAstbury PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,364
    Likes Received:
    48
    Try the breed rescue - depending on the area you live - there are various Labrador Rescues around the country - I volunteer for 1 of them
     
  8. Faithy5690

    Faithy5690 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2011
    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks for your concern guys, I have spoken and been in contact with the breeder for a while and they have vet checked me and asked me lots of questions to make sure me and my family are suitable candidates for having one of their pups.
    Furthermore, i think i may have put it across wrong in the post, when i say going to see the litter i am going to see them but more the breeder, sire and dam and environment they are being brought up in before we commit 100%. They are reputable KC breeders and i have checked with the kennel club health checker that all of the medical scores and records given to me are correct and up to date, of course i will ask for relevant paperwork for these as well. As far as going to see them at two weeks we am not going to handle them etc just look at them from arms length with their mom, for health/germs reasons and for the benefit of both pups and mother the breeder will not allow this.
    Also, since speaking to the breeder again they made it clear that we wouldn't be picking a pup on saturday meerly looking/checking and asking questions, then if wanting one putting a deposit down. When they are 4-6 weeks old i will visit again to have the pick of the litter when they have more of their own personality and nature etc.
    Thanks:001_smile:
     
  9. candysmum

    candysmum PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    3,495
    Likes Received:
    47
    I have always said one thing. A puppy picks you, you dont pick them. :D

    Its something i have always let happen on its own.

    Every litter i have ever gone to see i always see whcih of the bitches have come to me first out of the ones availab;e. i dont go charging in and picking them up etc i just sit quietly with mum talking to her and getting to know her and then see which pup comes sits in my lap or by me. :D

    If that pups happy to stay there then I feel the pup has picked me.

    when i went to see candy and her 2 sisters (i had pick of the girls then) 1 pup just stayed with her brothers, one pup was running around like a nut case would run up and then run off again and candy just came and laid at my feet they were 5 weeks old then. And i must say i did like th elook of candy more than Buttons and Cookie the other 2 girls.

    This litter well there was only 2 girls out of the litter so I didn't get to "pick" however I still went in as i normally would becasue if she didn't do what i was hoping i would have walked away. But she came as sat next to me while her 5 siblings played and i knew she was the one.

    Good luck

    x
     
  10. Faithy5690

    Faithy5690 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2011
    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    1

    Thanks, that's what i am hoping will happen with us! I will keep you posted :001_smile:
     
  11. JayLib

    JayLib PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    13
    A real exciting time for you - big smiles all round!

    With Labs it's really important to check the hip scores as they are renowned for having issues with dysplacia (or however it's spelt) - the lower the joint score of Mum & Dad the better!

    We have had our choccie lab in the family now for nearly 10 years and she is just the most amazing and loyal friend we have had.....

    Oh and lastly - watch the food intake, Labs will literally eat themselves until they are sick!!!!!

    Good luck and happy futures!
     
  12. the melster

    the melster PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    903
    Likes Received:
    24
    Just what I was going to say .. but not as well :D
     
  13. Sleeping_Lion

    Sleeping_Lion Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    21,576
    Likes Received:
    665
    Labs are not renowned for having hip dysplasia, they are pretty healthy overall as a breed, BUT enough do suffer for this to be a health test recommended by the KC. Health tests I would want to see in place are Hip Score, current clear eye cert from the BVA and the dna test for PRA as a minimum, I'd also want to see elbow grading, and possibly the dna test for CNM for both parents.

    The breed mean standard for hip scores for Labs is 15, so you want a hip score for the parents around that, and nice and even, so 7:7, 6:7 etc, the lower the score the better, but that does not guarantee you low scoring progeny. Labs are scored out of 53 per hip, so a total of 106.

    The BVA current clear eye cert is an annual test and should be current at the time of mating for both parents.

    Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) isn't a huge problem, but it's an easy dna test and there's no reason not to. If the parents have been tested clear, the pups should be cbp (clear by parentage). BUT, it is possible to breed from both carrier and affected status and breed clear of this condition - the proviso there though is that if the dog is affected status (doesn't mean clinically affected) that it has to be an exceptional example to breed from.

    Elbow grading is similar in a way to hip scoring but a much smaller range of only 0-3; the KC recommends (I believe) nothing above a 0:1 or 1:0 should be bred from. The way the grading is expressed is by the highest grade, so a 0:0 is a 0, a 1:1 is a 1, and a 0:2 is a 2.

    CNM (centro nuclear myopathy) isn't that much of a problem within the breed, and sadly, those pups born that are *affected* often don't survive.

    You can read more about the health tests here:

    Welcome to Labrador Health

    If the breeder doesn't have the minimum health tests in place for both parents, please walk away, and I will help you find a breeder who does the appropriate health tests and has good breeding stock. I'd rather help people than see them go to someone who's cutting any corners, as would many other responsible Labrador owners/breeders.

    Also, I'd want to know why they're breeding, why use the stud dog they've chosen, do they show, work? It's rare to find chocolates that work, and there's no such thing as a proven working chocolate pedigree, in the same way as for yellows and blacks.

    If you have any doubts, don't view the litter, as it's so much more difficult to walk away after seeing cute pups. Please read the stories on the link I gave you, Labradors are one of the most exploited breeds as they make popular pets, and chocolate Labradors in particular are churned out for the pet market. So please don't support an irresponsible breeder :)
     
    portiaa likes this.
  14. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    19,389
    Likes Received:
    16,611
    I would imagine that is another new member lost.

    How about some nice normal comments like making sure the bitch is happy and friendly and a nice shape and weight.

    The pups are reared in the house and will be used to a selection of people and normal household noises.

    Watch how the breeder interacts with both bitch and puppies and of course any other dogs she has.

    And make sure you get on with the breeder as well as the dogs as you might have a lot to do with her.

    Sounds like you are doing every thing right and what a shame that the usual suspects have jumped down your throat without finding out the facts first.
     
  15. Jess2308

    Jess2308 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 12, 2009
    Messages:
    2,886
    Likes Received:
    145
    Why is the breeder giving you pick of litter? Surely they want that for themselves :confused:

    I breed labs (very occassionally!) and can tell you that at 2 weeks they are like little slugs, they do little more than sleep, crawl, poo and feed. They cant see much and dont really interact with people much at all.

    Like others have said, no one in the right mind would have visitors for 2 week old pups, 4 weeks is the absolute minimum. They are more interactive then and you get an idea of what they are going to be like. But still, picking a pup isnt ideal until about 6 or 7 weeks when their personalities and characters will be coming out more. It wont make any difference waiting til 4 weeks to see the parents and breeder, you can still walk away then (i would now just knowing they are happy to risk the pups at 2 weeks of age :rolleyes: ) so it doesnt make any difference to that and there is much less risk of you inadvertantly bringing something into the breeders home and infecting the pups.

    BUT, you need to check the health documentation to make sure its all above board, check mum and dad (if he's available) see what their temperments are like. Check the environment the pups are raised in. I dont expect a breeders home to be spotless like a show home (how many dog houses are?!) but the home should be clean and hygenic, as should pups and mum. Mum should be healthy and a good weight and have no obvious signs of illness, neither should the pups. The breeder should be happy to answer any questions and I would expect them to ask you a lot too. i would want to see their other dogs and how they are kept. I wouldnt buy from a breeder who keeps their dogs in a way I wouldnt keep my own :)
     
    #15 Jess2308, Apr 13, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2011
  16. CAstbury

    CAstbury PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,364
    Likes Received:
    48
    I havent jumped down anyone's throat thank you
     
  17. bagpuss4

    bagpuss4 PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2011
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    1
    Sounds very early to me i went to see Baxter and litter at 6 weeks old and got him 2 weeks later. Baxter came to me sat on my lap and chewed my fingers. Initial on 1st sight he wasn't my 1st choice but the one i wanted was very shy and hede under a cushion the whole time i was there. spoke and played with the pups and mothers then come home with my wee baxter. So i;d agree with the pup picks you.
     
    #17 bagpuss4, Apr 13, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2011
  18. archiebaby

    archiebaby PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Messages:
    5,849
    Likes Received:
    103

    i was giving my opinion and 100% stick to that, no decent breeder would let strangers into see 2 week old puppies:( and i dont think that is jumping down anyone's throat and might actually have helped the op:rolleyes:
     
  19. s4simo

    s4simo PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2011
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    5
    We saw Bracken at 6 weeks old and then had to go back twice more over the next 5 weeks - a round trip of 4 hours! But the breeder said quite rightly that if we had a problem with that then we wouldn't be having one of her dogs and we weren't suitable to commit for the next 10+ years :eek: .....harsh but true I think.
    She also insisted we looked around her home and where the dogs were kept and quite frankly most humans don't live in such nice surroundings!
     
  20. Faithy5690

    Faithy5690 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2011
    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks for the support Blitz, I was feeling slightly bombarded with negatives about the whole thing! :(
    At the same time I do value everyones advice and opinion. That is why i am on here afterall :001_smile:

    I would also like to say to everyone that i may not be experienced in this whole getting a puppy game, in fact quite a novice but I have done a lot of research and been looking for a while to find the right breeder for all the right reasons. Furthermore, you all say that two week old puppies are too young to visit, fair enough, but there is a waiting list for them at and has been since they were born, and if i waited until they were 4-6 weeks before visiting then they would proably all be spoken for. I understand that many breeders advertise when their puppies are either older or at 8 weeks when they are available to go to homes and that is when prospective buyers view them, however i did not want this, i wanted to find a breeder who had a waiting list and were waiting on a litter so that i had a puppy reserved and was prepared knowing when i would get him, rather than rushing to get one around the time. I do plan to visit on many occasions before having him as well. I didn't want to put my name down over the phone with the breeder without seeing the environment/breeder and mother first. Is this so bad?

    :001_smile::001_smile:
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice