Glossary - Explanation of Abbreviations, Acronyms and Jargon

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by RobD-BCactive, May 28, 2011.


  1. leashedForLife

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2009
    Messages:
    18,962
    Likes Received:
    3,332
    yes, dear - :ihih: U told me to look over the definitions, & i did.
    a 'marker-Yes' is generally described as short & crisp, not "Yessss!".
    also, a whistle of S/S is the industry-standard for marine-mammal training, as is a thumbs-up for deaf-dogs;
    i've only seen one person use a starburst-hand to mark goal-behavior for a deaf-dog, usually it's one or another
    of the approval signals from ASL -
    American Sign Language, which U also might want to include.

    since consequences drive behavior, & the fact that the marker: click, flash, hand-sign, etc -
    predicts a reward is the salient clue to our learner of any species, i thought that should
    also be included in the definition. :001_smile:


    artificial language: an entirely-invented language, usually symbols, which can be used by non-humans
    to communicate with humans or non-humans conversant in the artificial language. see machine language.

    ASL: American Sign Language, a system of hand-signs which convey words or phrases,
    used to communicate by deaf-persons, or in very loud environs, or to communicate with non-humans.
    also see artificial language or machine language.


    machine language: an entirely-invented system of communication, usually symbols, used in research
    on the abilities & limits of non-human intelligence, thus far mostly in primates. see artificial language.


    EDIT: also, i think U missed 'Extinction' - the so-called 5th quadrant. ;)
     
    #21 leashedForLife, Jun 5, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2011
  2. leashedForLife

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2009
    Messages:
    18,962
    Likes Received:
    3,332
    Antecedant, Behavior, Consequence: the ABCs of behavior: a setting or stimulus
    or circumstance, followed by a behavior - which may be desired or undesired or neutral -
    followed by a consequence, an event - which may be rewarding or neutral or aversive.
    rewarding behaviors are repeated; if the reward was an accident, the superstitious behavior will be
    gradually extinguished. If we want desired behaviors to persist, we must ensure they are rewarded.
    unrewarding behaviors or those followed by aversives are less-likely to be repeated; there are exceptions.
    see self-rewarding behaviors.


    antecedant: the event, setting or circumstance immediately before a behavior; recognizing an antecedant
    [the cat runs] allows us to predict or prevent un-wanted behavior [the dog chases], or design a training plan
    to elicit wanted behavior.
    also, the first component of the sequence Antecedant, Behavior, Consequence.


    behavior: anything an animal does, which may influence their environs, attain a goal, or satisfy a need.
    behaviors can be offered or elicited or cued; if the behavior is desired, it should be rewarded,
    even if it was freely offered [spontaneous] or elicited; IOW not only cued behaviors are rewarded.
    also, the active second-step of the pattern, Antecedant, Behavior, Consequence.


    consequence: the event immediately following a behavior; this may be accidental, which can lead
    to troublesome superstitious behaviors which must be extinguished or carefully modified,
    but if this is a planned consequence, it is a reward for desired behavior, or a non-reward for undesired
    behavior, or an aversive for undesired behavior if the trainer uses such consequences.
    this is the third term in the pattern, Antecedant, Behavior, Consequence.


    elicit: to draw out or call forth; in this context, to elicit a behavior is to have a set of circumstances which
    trigger or instigate a specific behavior or set of behaviors; hopefully this is planned, not random or accidental.
    I-E, it is possible to elicit a bite, as well as a sit or down.


    enrichment: to add activities to an animal's environment or life, in order to stimulate them mentally
    and / or physically; often these are objects for exploration or busywork - food puzzles for dogs
    & objects to destroy for psittacines, scents for big-cats, floating toys for polar bears, etc.
    they can also allow for natural behaviors, as dusting-baths for chinchilla or poultry, a wallow
    for hippos, digging areas for terriers, tunnels for ferrets, & so on.


    management: the lifelong oversight of behavior to prevent unwanted behaviors & encourage
    wanted behaviors; not allowing a dog who has no recall to roam off-leash is management, as is a long-line
    to allow that dog to run or sniff without running off. management tools to prevent include leash,
    baby-gate, umbilical-cord, doors, etc; mgmt-tools to encourage include stuffed Kongs, Buster-cubes,
    comfortable dog-beds, destructible food-puzzles, etc.


    self-rewarding behaviors: may be neutral, as sleep, eat, move; generally they are instinctive,
    & often potentially problematic, such as barking, free-roaming after escaping a fenced area
    or bolting thru an open door. Exploring & play are self-rewarding behaviors which can be used to add
    enrichment to an animal's life. self-rewarding behaviors may persist, even in the face of aversives.
    ineffective punishment can be seen as nagging, or if it involves persistent application of aversives,
    can become abuse.
    eliminating opportunities for un-desired self-rewarding behaviors
    thru management is safer, more effective & far-more humane.
     
  3. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,401
    Likes Received:
    29
    Twiggy's advocated "Yessss!" quite a few times on forum, without anyone piping up, it was a nod to her, including that. I've even experimented with reasonable success with making a click with my own tongue, trickier on the move though.

    I'll go through it all again when I'm less tired... praps tomorrow morning :)
     
  4. LouJ69

    LouJ69 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    5,967
    Likes Received:
    100
    CER-Conditioned Emotional Response.
    This is when the dog builds up an emotional response to something due to his past experiences with it. He has no control over the response. For example-being in school & getting called to the Principal's office-that drop in your stomach that you always get. You've built up a CER to it.
    Hope that explains it properly! lol
     
  5. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,401
    Likes Received:
    29
    Had this prepared, hopefully this suits both the pedant and the layman's needs.

    If anyone objects to the aversion / dog aggression link, they should refer themselves (again) to resources provided here studies that have analysed the use of aversives in dog training.

    Think the Glossary has become quite a useful resource already, thanks to all those who contributed ideas and resources to forum, or the thread.
     
    #25 RobD-BCactive, Jun 6, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2011
  6. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,401
    Likes Received:
    29
    Added APBC (thanks rottiemum)
    Added TBH (thanks Doolally)
    Reference to Gundog section started by Sleeping Lion
     
    #26 RobD-BCactive, Jun 7, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2011
  7. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,401
    Likes Received:
    29
    #27 RobD-BCactive, Jun 8, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2011
  8. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,401
    Likes Received:
    29
    Having reviewed the various vet referral, UK Bhaviourist organisations that might be recommended when consulting a professional behaviourist, have tried to add useful information for ppl seeking a consultant professional.
    The redundant entry is to reduce any perceived favouritism due to alphabetical sorting.

    I hope people can see that this is an attempt at a fair summary of confusing situation to aid those seeking qualified professional advice; even if you might differ on details.

    UKRCB : UK Registry of Canine Behaviourists (thanks lucysnewmum)
    CFBA : Canine and Feline Behaviour Association (thanks Irish Setter Gal)
     
    #28 RobD-BCactive, Jun 10, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2011
  9. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,401
    Likes Received:
    29
    There's been some need for work on conciseness to keep the Glossary within 2,000 characters. May need to prune some terms, or explanations.

    Alternative it would be possible to break acryonyms and terms up into seperate posts, or split alphabetically, or even combine things like IMO & IMNSHO with a link to an external post (may be wise as they're not particularly dog training related and whilst common on net, aren't particularly heavily used in DT&B).
     
    #29 RobD-BCactive, Jun 15, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2011
  10. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,401
    Likes Received:
    29
    General Terms - Not specific to Dog Training but commonly used on Net

    aggro : British slang for aggravation & aggression
    ASL : American Sign Language, a system of hand-signs which convey words or phrases,
    used to communicate by deaf-persons, or in very loud environs, or even to communicate with non-humans.
    astroturfing : a form of advocacy often in support of a political or corporate agenda disguised to appear as a "grassroots" movement (See Astroturfing - Wikipedia)

    FWIW : For What It's Worth
    FYI : For Your Information

    GMTA : Great Minds Think Alike (but fools seldom differ)

    IIRC : If I Recall Correctly
    IME : In My Experience
    IMHO : In My Humble Opinion
    IMNSHO : In My Not So Humble Opinion
    IMO : In My Opinion
    IOW : In Other Words

    OP : Original Poster

    TBH : To Be Honest
    TIA : Thanks In Anticipation

    YMMV : Your Mileage May Vary

    viral marketing : use pre-existing social networks to produce increases in brand awareness or achieve objectives (like product sales) through self-replicating processes (See Viral marketing - Wikipedia)
     
    #30 RobD-BCactive, Jun 21, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2011
  11. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,401
    Likes Received:
    29
    Updates for 2,000 character limit to posts, removing general terms to own section.

    Addition of new terms that appear newly relevant to DT&B.

     
    #31 RobD-BCactive, Jun 21, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2011
  12. LuvMyDog_Worldwide

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2011
    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    3
    And two more.....


    NeoLudite
    One-trick Pony



    BTW, in net speak, ASL is Age/Sex/Location, not American Sign Language...um, ROFLMAO.


    regards,

    Austin
     
    #32 LuvMyDog_Worldwide, Jun 22, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2011
  13. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,401
    Likes Received:
    29
    Now those places will make you go blind!
     
  14. lab

    lab PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2013
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    This thread saved me hours of searching the net. amazing :)
     
  15. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2014
    Messages:
    304
    Likes Received:
    87
    Quickie....as you mention Ian Dunbar, why not the late John Fisher (credited in UK as founding the APDT), Gwen Bailey, Karen Pryor etc.? Not a criticism, just wondered.
     
  16. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,401
    Likes Received:
    29
    Why not make some summary entries in the thread and link to any useful sources?

    At the time the Glossary was first posted, there were complaints about Jargon, and quite a lot of controversy. IMO due to advocates of certain suppressive methods using political campaign techniques misrepresenting theory or consensus techniques, and generally using negativity and FUD to try to undermine and expend time of certain professional behaviourists and others contributing by fielding regular common questions.

    Dunbar had many useful materials on website, and copped more FLAK than most, so encouraging the reader to read first hand and judge for themselves seemed important.

    Some entries are there simply because they amused the author and lighten the dryness and info density. Very soon, a post character length limit was reached, so at times every word and entry was subject to pruning.