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Getting a pug, already have a lab!

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Laura Platt, Oct 16, 2018.


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  1. Laura Platt

    Laura Platt PetForums Newbie

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    Hello,

    I need some advice i have a 5 year old lab and we'd like to get a pug puppy. My lab doesn't play fight so im not worried about the pug getting hurt, they will also be kept separate while unsupervised.

    Ive read pugs cant go in crates? And are harder to house train. Just general advice on getting a pug and their health conditions. Do they need alot of vet care or are most the pugs healthy. Pug will be kc reg with full health checks. Any experience you have with pugs would be appreciated.

    Thank you
    Laura
     
  2. BlueJay

    BlueJay Made of bones

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    Most pugs are certainly not healthy.
    http://www.dogbreedhealth.com/pug/

    You need to be very careful about the breeder you choose.
    Please don't support people breeding the flattest faces and the narrowest nostrils possible. For a better chance at fewer health issues directly related to conformation at the very least (potential eye issues from protruding eyes and shallow sockets, BOAS; potential surgery needed on nares and soft palate to be able to breathe more easily, skin fold dermatitis, awful dentition needing vet attention etc etc), find someone breeding more moderate pugs; longer muzzles, open nostrils, parents with full health tests and screenings, ideally information on health back a good few generations.
    Join Cruffa on Facebook if you have it and ask about help finding good breeders there :)

    I see no reason why pugs can't go in crates like any other dog? Was a reason given for this??
     
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  3. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    Ditto above. And I'm not aware of anything that makes housetraining more difficult in pugs than any other breed.

    Toilet training happens when two things come together - the ABILITY to hold the toilet, along with the DESIRE to hold it in order to earn the reward for doing so.

    Ideally you want him to not be in a position where he needs to toilet before you have him outdoors, so that every toilet is outside - as far as possible, there will be accidents! So set him up to succeed by taking him out even more than he needs; for example every 45 minutes to an hour and always after sleeping, eating, playing. The time between a puppy realising they need to toilet, and being unable to hold that toilet, is zero. So your aim is to have him outside before he can't help himself. When he toilets outdoors make a huge fuss (never mind the neighbours, act like outdoor toileting is the best thing you have ever seen) and reward him with a high value treat. Do that that immediately, don't make him come to you for the treat so he is clear that it's for toileting and not for coming to you. The idea is that he eventually wants to earn the treat enough to hold the toilet until he is outside - once he is physically able to control his toileting obviously. If he has an accident inside don't react at all. If you get annoyed he may learn to fear your reaction and avoid you if he needs to toilet - the opposite of what you want. Just clean the area with an enzymatic cleaner to remove any trace of smell that might attract him back to the spot. As he is actually performing the toilet you can introduce words he can associate with it (like 'do weewee' and 'busy busy') that later when he is reliably trained you can use these to tell him when you want him to toilet.

    Indoors if you see him circling or scratching the floor, that can sometimes precede toileting so get him out fast.

    Overnight he is unlikely to be able to control his toilet as his little bladder and bowel are underdeveloped and not strong enough to hold all night so set your alarm to take him out at least once if not twice during the night.

    I dont know if you were planning to use them, but I really don't like puppy pads - they give mixed messages about whether it's ok to toilet indoors and confuse the puppy.
     
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  4. sighthounds

    sighthounds PetForums Member

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    Please think hard before getting a pug, they are prone to horrible, cruel health conditions. Please search google images for a photo of pug skulls... :(
     
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  5. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums Senior

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    What led you down the route to wanting a pug? As others have said, they are most definitely NOT a healthy breed. Finding a healthy litter is a minefield, especially trying to dodge being conned into poorly bred or illegally imported dogs. It's not just breathing, but eye and spinal problems too. You see so many pugs who've had to have one, or even both, eyes removed after they've been damaged :(

    Would you consider rescue dogs instead? At least a reputable rescue can match make with your existing dog and many have pug and pug crosses - in fact many pug outcrosses are a healthier "puggy" option than purebred BUT again, minefields if you went privately, you'd most likely end up with a dog bred entirely for profit.
     
  6. mrs phas

    mrs phas my home, my sofa, my rules

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    Please don't buy a pug, there's a rescue that has MANY many pugs in at the moment, as well as puggles
    If you really want one (and I can see the attraction of these miniature mastiffs) please think about rescue route. Not all rescue dogs have bad back stories and, if you're not planning to breed from yours (please don't) will already come castrated and up to date with inoculations (saving you heaps of money)
     
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  7. XemzX

    XemzX PetForums VIP

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    I second this. I have noticed a massive increase in pugs and pug crosses recently in rescues sadly.
    https://www.manytearsrescue.org/dogslookingforhomes.php. Ive noticed this rescue often have pugs. They occasionally have puppies too - having a little look now it seems they have some seven month old pug crosses.
     
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  8. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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  9. mrs phas

    mrs phas my home, my sofa, my rules

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    \I was trying to be clever, as i dont know, despite my years on here, if we can link to rescues or not
    i know we cant buy, sell or link to breeders
    they have some gorgeous pugs/crosses on there, and, despite living as far east of the rescue, that you can get and still be in the same country, i would drive to get one
    however o room at the inn, and you can bet your bottom dollar, when there is, therell be no pugs, frenchies, or white boxers to be had, anywhere
     
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  10. XemzX

    XemzX PetForums VIP

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    There is some lovely dogs on there isn’t there :) pugs are small, he might not notice ;)

    Oops! I’m not sure to be honest - I’ll have to check the rules.
    I can relate to how you feel. There are a few breeds I am interested in on my ‘one day’ list and I keep seeing them pop up in rescue. Yet I know when the time is right for another dog there won’t be any to be found. I really should stop looking at rescue pages! :rolleyes:
     
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  11. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Many people have linked to rescues with no repercussions.
     
  12. Tucson

    Tucson PetForums Junior

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    I have 5 Pugs and there is no reason why a well bred Pug from health tested parents should visit the vet any more frequently than any other dog, Mine certainly don't.
    Who says Pugs can't go in crates, that's total nonsense any dog can.
    They can certainly take their time with house training.
    Please make sure you go to a reputable breeder who carries out all the relevant health checks and stay away from so called rare colours such as merle, stick to fawn or black and expect to go on a waiting list and expect to pay around 1200 quid. There's no such thing as a cheap Pug. Look for a reputable
    breeder on champdogs

    Price edited due to keyboard fault.
     
    #12 Tucson, Oct 17, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2018
  13. mrs phas

    mrs phas my home, my sofa, my rules

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    i presume you missed a 0 off of that figure of 120
    otherwiswe i want to know where i can go to see these marvously well bred pugs for just 120 :D
     
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  14. kare

    kare PetForums VIP

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    Please do not get a pug. The British Veterinary Association are largely desperate to get people to stop buying animals such as these designed to suffer for the whims of Humans.

    They, the RSPCA, Dogs Trust and many other groups have signed campaigns to ask advertisers to stop even featuring Pugs and other Brachy (dogs lacking a fully fuctional muzzle to breath and cool themselves) in adverts to stop the drive for people to buy them.

    Pugs suffer because of their airways, including fits from not being able to cool their brains in the heat (ie most of the past summer) eye issues as mentioned above and nasty dental issues to name just a few

    I think people said they are not a healthy breed not that they need to visit the vets more

    The majority of their great number of disabilities are considered breed traits ie not only not fixable, so no reason to see a vet but also wanted in those cruel enough to choose looks over function.
     
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  15. KSvedenmacher

    KSvedenmacher PetForums Junior

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    We have a 14 week old puppy who has been with us for 6 weeks now. He definitely goes in crates (no idea why he couldn't and house training is going well. We have the odd accident, but if we are vigilant and take him out a lot, he does all of his business outside.

    I also thought pugs didn't like to go out in the rain, but Yoda doesn't seem to mind one bit. The one thing I would say is that pugs love company. Yoda follows me around all the time when I am home and when I'm at work he shadows my husband who works from home.
     
  16. Tucson

    Tucson PetForums Junior

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    Oh I certainly did it should read 1200 but my keyboard was having a fit that day and kept skipping double strikes such as oo ee etc.
     
  17. Tucson

    Tucson PetForums Junior

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    I didn't disagree with what anyone else said but you can certainly find healthy Pugs if you look. My Pugs are healthy and if they need the vet they would go but they have no issues that need addressing. None of them suffer with Boas, they certainly don't have fits and were fine in the heat. They all still have both eyes thanks and have no issues with their eyes at all. They manage to eat their raw diet just fine and have no dental problems. So my Pugs have all so far had damn healthy lives,not something that everyone can claim. At no point did I say Pugs were a healthy breed in general, because that wouldn't be true but if you put in the effort you can find good breeders who care about the quality of life of the Pugs they breed. Your last sentence makes no sense to me at all, surely unhealthy dogs do visit the vet more.
     
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  18. Tucson

    Tucson PetForums Junior

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    My Pugs all go out in the rain too, they wouldn't dream of giving up their ramble in the woods just because it's wet.
    Mine vary in how attached to me they seem to want to be, funnily enough the most clingy is the one I took in and rehomed aged 2 because her owner had died, she is usually attached to my left arm while I'm typing.
     
  19. BlueJay

    BlueJay Made of bones

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    Not necessarily.

    Not pug specific here, but far too many people - the general public as well as actual brachy breed owners see the grunting, snorting, snoring, rasping noises of a lot of these dogs as completely fine and dandy, it's just part of the breed(s), a cute quirk.
    If your spaniel or whippet or literally any other non brachy breed started breathing like that you'd be at panic stations rather than just accepting it as a breed trait.

    Same with tail pockets, excessive wrinkles, droopy eyes, queen annes legs, completely closed nares, f'ed up teeth etc.
    "Oh, that's just how they are. They're supposed to be like that. He seems fine. He's acting normal."
    If they see it as fine, they're not going to take the dog to a vets about it. But none of those things are in any way healthy and should not be bred for or normalised.
     
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  20. Jackie Lee

    Jackie Lee Banned

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    I have a friend who owned a pug and so far, I haven't seen him struggling on taking care of it. Most pugs are HEALTHY and it's not true that pugs can't go to crate. Please think and decide carefully.
     
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