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Getting a Beautiful Border Collie pup. Need advice

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by BekkiHannah, May 6, 2010.


  1. BekkiHannah

    BekkiHannah PetForums Newbie

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    Hi.

    my name is hannah, im new to this site and i find it very helpful..

    I am getting a beautiful border collie pup on sat 9th.:001_tt1: And i have had a border collie before but never as a pup. My last border collie we got from the pound and was the most amazing dogs ever !.:)

    I am just seeing if anyone would like to give me some advice because i have never had a pup and i know it is going to be hard work especially considering she/he will be a border collie.

    Is there a certain food you should feed a border collie pup and i was just wondering if i could get some tips on how to start the training?

    I have looked every where for answer for these questions and found NOTHING !! all i have gotten was border collies are trained different to other dogs. Its soo frustrating. :confused1:
     
  2. RachyBobs

    RachyBobs PetForums VIP

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    There is a nice lady on here who has a bc puppy and hes super trained! Hopefully she will come along and help. I have a 18 year old bc shes amazing. I found the trick with her was that she likes to be rewarded with a tennis ball and every other collie i have met has been totally obsessed with a tennis ball!
     
  3. PembrokeMadhouse

    PembrokeMadhouse PetForums VIP

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    I have not had experience with BC puppies either, but my 6 year old was from the rescue and was not house trained but trained in recall and basics :confused: what ever you decide to do, do it from day one and don't change it .... BCs can wrap you round their pawsies if you let them get away with something one day and not the next ....

    And balls .... mine is not obsessed with tennis balls, but I spend a fortune in footballs. She is also mega obsessed with sticks and will go and tear up a tree/bush in order to get a stick ... try as I may I have tried to get her on to rope throwy thingys but no nothing.... perhaps one of the toy makers could make a non squeaky stick shaped toy!

    Good luck with your pup - it won't be easy but it will be rewarding I am sure.

    Clare
     
  4. tsgray70

    tsgray70 PetForums Member

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    Our Border Collie is 1 year old now and I will agree with the ball comments. Ours is obsessed with balls and toys and the back door. She has eased up on the obsessiveness, but she went in to overdrive when she was is season.

    Intelligence is the first thing people say when talking about collies and Amy is no exception. She is by far the smartest dog in the park but that can be a double-edged sword. You have to stay in control and don't let them play the 'I'm so cute' card.

    On the plus side, having a collie is incredibly rewarding. Just be aware that they are hard work. They will run for hours and still be raring to go. Amy is up to 2 toy boxes now because she loves to play all the time. In fact, i think that emptying the toy boxes is just about her favourite game.

    To be honest, I was very naive when we got Amy. Everybody said how much work they were but on reflection, I wouldn't change her for the world.
     
  5. SarahMoorhouse

    SarahMoorhouse PetForums Newbie

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    We have had our BC puppy for a week now and he is really hard work, learnt sit really quickly, does well with toilet training until 9pm when he seems to forget everything he has learnt, but for 10 weeks I am really pleased with his progress. He does try to push his luck all the time and we have to keep a constant eye on him.

    Just trying to find a way to wear him out now as nothing seems to work :)
     
  6. katiefranke

    katiefranke PetForums VIP

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    Ok so having a BC pup is not THAT different from any other pup - so your best place to start would be with reading this:

    Before You Get Your Puppy | Dog Star Daily

    (its a free e-Book on what to do before and after you get your puppy - if you use the links to the left it takes you to the different sections of the content)

    And getting your hands on a copy of Gwen Bailey's "The Pefect Puppy" book. excellent book for anyone getting a puppy for the first time or who hasnt had a pup in a while!

    Have a look at this for some excellent info on understanding BCs - and what to be prepared for: VALGRAYS BORDER COLLIE RESCUE - Understanding Collies

    Always remember that a BC will pick up bad habits just as quick as good - so BE PREPARED!! and anything you wont find acceptable as an adult, do not let them do as a pup - even if it is cute, as this will lead to problems.

    I would suggest starting training as fun games etc from day one, in very short sessions or a couple of mins at a time lots of times throughout the day....and SOCIALISATION SOCIALISATION SOCIALISATION!!!! cannot stress how important it is for any pup, but especially a BC.

    also be prepared for the nipping! all puppies nip and this is normal, but it can take you by suprise as it can seem quite viscious initially!!

    and we are all here, so come ask in the training section etc if you have any specific questions - good luck and piccies when you get pup :thumbup:

    PS: there are quite a few of us on here with BCs so ask away if you have questions!! :)

    edit: sorry forgot to add - FOOD. ok so anything that is a 'good' food. i personally feed a completely raw diet but i know this is not for everyone. so something that is not packed full of additives, colourings and preservatives. please do not put your pup on something like bakers! have a look in the health and nutrition section as there are lots of threads on the best foods (Orijen dry and naturediet wet being my preferred ones if i had to feed a commercial food, with raw meaty bones a few times a week to clean their teeth and gums). other brands that you might want to look into would be Arden Grange (dry and wet) and CSJ.

    however, saying all that, the most important thing is 'what is the breeder feeding pup'? you need to stick with the same food for at least a couple of weeks until pup is settled in. and then change it over gradually when and if you do change it. so adding a very small amount of the new food gradually every day and less of the old one until over about 2 weeks the pup is on the new food and the old one phased out.
     
    #6 katiefranke, May 7, 2010
    Last edited: May 7, 2010
    cutekiaro1 likes this.
  7. Tanya1989

    Tanya1989 PetForums VIP

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    As with most dogs, exercise should be limited as a youngster (up til 12 months for a BC) for 5 mins twice a day exercise per month that the puppy is old, so a 4 months old puppy can have 20 mins twice a day exercise, well spaced out with ample rest time in between. Five months= 25mins x2 per day

    Free running should be done on their own, with no adult dogs to chase or be chased by. Also no ball games when free running. As should excessive rough housing be avoided.

    With a BC you will have to exercise them with their mind. Learning tricks, practising obedience etc. There are loads of trick books available on amazon for ideas for tricks to teach.

    BCs require a routine more so than a "laid back" breed, that is what I have found anyway. So crate training I find is a good tool to use for calming the dog when excitable.
     
    leoti likes this.
  8. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Burns mini bites is a good food for a BC puppy - lower protein for slower growth and a calm demeanor. Where is your pup from, farm or show lines? BCs need a lot of socialising as pups, to prevent their anxious and obsessive side taking over, so before it can walk outside, carry it everywhere with you. I had mine tucked into the front of my jacket at first, later in a baby sling. Make sure it has loads of good experiences with people, traffic, other animals.
     
  9. hutch6

    hutch6 PetForums VIP

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    All BCs want to be the centre of attention at any given moment so you must have a wicked sense of humour and be quick on your toes for what they will do to get attention as some of it needs nipping in the bud with alternative behaviours being taught but the rest you can just let them fly and you'll be in tears of laughter at what they do.

    There is one golden rule when it comes to being awake around your dog - Everything is a game. Sit - "Ok I'll sit but what's next?" Wait - "Ok I'll wait but what's next?" etc etc etc etc etc.

    Top ten tips:

    1). As everyone else has said get the dog wrapped up in your jacket and get it out around, traffic, pigeons, ducks, kids, people, trees blowing in the wind, windmills, bikes, runners, cats, litter blowing down the street and absolutely anything else you can think of. Put some treats in your pockets and ask random strangers of any age, sex, height, width or dress sense to give your dog a treat and a stroke.

    2). Touch your dog until you are bored. Touch it's ears, mouth, body, legs, kness, tail, feet, head, stomach, back, neck and chin etc and give plenty of rewards for tollerating this. Give loads of treats when handling feets - nice little jingle for you. Put the claw clippers on the claw (don't cut) but give tons of reward, put a little pressure on the clippers but again don;t cut and give even more praise. You have no idea how beneficial this becomes later when it comes to examinations, grooming and clipping.

    3). Teach bite control to the view of no teeth should ever touch skin. This leads to a dog you can trust even if you can't trust some peopel aroudn your dog.

    4). Stress your dog. Sounds horrible but has huge benefits later. Leave your dog for short periods (inceasing over time) to get used to being on it's own and how to deal with that. Get your pup in a corner and praise it, stroke it and make being in a corner a joy - a dog not used to being in a corner may be prone to defending itself.

    5). Selective toys. A dog on it's own will not play for very long despite how many toys you buy because you don't want it to get bored when you leave it for a few hours etc. A dog on it's own will play for about 5mins, get bored and then sleep. A tennis ball is the number one toy as they can stalk it, chase it, grab it and no doubt kill the first 30 until top tip number 4 has been conquered. Get a tug toy as another toy as they can chase it, grab it and kill it as much as they like and you are engaged with this activity all of the time - tug toys are only interesting if there is someone else to tug with. Plant pots are another great little toy. Gte a few of the same size and hide things underneath them to sniff out, they roll around in an odd way when the dog pushes them, you can get the dog to put stuff in them and then get it out again and best of all they cost about 20p. Frisbee. Not for everyone but I have had a magical time with these as they are like tennis balls but allow for a bit of variation. They fly so the dog can jump for them, learn to track them through the air, they aren't as easily lost when thrown in undergroth for the dog to go find and you have to end up getting them, you can roll them on their edge for the dog to chase down, there are loads of different ways for the dfog to carry them so they get used to various different touches aroudn their head area without any effort from you and of course when the dog is about 14-18months you can get the dog to chase, jump and catch the frisbee. Always a crowd pleaser. Footballs. Great fun for the dog to roll around. Get one that is bigger than the pup to begin with so it can't burst it and has to work out different ways to move it around.
    Anything else is a potential toy to be honest so if you leave an empty cup on the floor expect to see it being toppled over and rolled around. A piece of paper such as the post will be pounced upon numerous times as it slides which is great fun before being torn to shreds. A dropped sock from the laundry will no doubt be picked up and you will duly invited to angage in a game of chase.
    Try and stay away from cuddly toys as they aren't very dog friendly - especially to chewing, tearing, ripping machines like puppies.

    6). An off switch. All dogs need down time when they can relax and they know nothing is expected of them and none more so than a dog that is constantly watching you and waiting for you to tell it what to do next. This falls in with top tip 4 becasue to teach this you have to completely ignore the dog - no contact be it eye, touch or verbal. Give a command to signal that the dog is left to it's own devices such "That'll do" or "Enough". With a pup you are in the amazing world of all or nothing. Whent he pup is awake then it is on 100% for about 20mins to an hour. This followed by a couple hours of sleep. Enjoy both times equally as they are now in the best measures :)

    7). Consistantly in a routine. As others have suggested get a routine going and the dog will settle into it, become less expectant and will have time to switch off. Dogs have a pretty accurate internal clock so if you can stick to set times for things like feeding, walking, playing and everything in between the dog will relax as you would if you knew certain things were coming and didn't have to worry. Consistancy in commands, trainign and step during the routine - sit before the lead goes on, sit before being fed, sit before the door is opened. If everyone in the hosue is reading fromt he same page when it comes to commands, hand signals, timetables etc then nobody gets stressed trying to work out what is what including the dog.

    8). House rules. Keep them simple, easily enforced and get them laid down early. Dog not allowed ont he sofa? Do everything witht he dog on the floor. If the floor is where all of the best things happen then that is where the dog is more likely to remain. If the dog is supposed to sleep in a certain place then when the pup falls asleep gently pick it up and place it where it supposed to sleep so when it wakes up it wakes up in it's bed. If it isn't allowed upstairs then prevent it getting up there by putting a baby gate in place. Prevention is better than cure at this stage and set the standard.

    9). Let dogs be dogs. Allow the dog to do what dogs do - sniff, pee, explore, bark, enagage with other dogs (when vaccinated of course). Teach the dog to bark and also to be quiet to allow it to get it's daily bark quota out if it is a vocal dog. Sniffing and marking are standard dog behaviours so let them get on with it, as long as they aren't marking your house of course. Coudl you teach me the customs of the deep Amazonian tribes without learnign from them direct? No so we can't teach a dog the manners of the canine world. As soon as the dog is vaccinated and immunised against outside nasties get the dog out around other dogs. Ask owners if their dog is ok with other dogs and ifg they wouldn't mind giving your dog ten minutes with theirs. I ask people with pups if they want to let their's engage with my three for a bit of play, interaction and social skill building. The beauty of this is that you can train the dog when enough is enough of playing with other dogs and a recall.

    10). Any excuse. No matter where you are, what you are doing with the dog embrace it all as a training opportunity. Enrole in a training class to sharpen your techniques and give the puppy socialisation with other pups and dogs. Make sure you do your research and get into a positive reinforcement method training class. Waterside scenarios, park scenarios, town scenarios, roadside scenarios (I could go on) are all superb arenas to do a nit of training as there are distractions galore to train against. Work your way up from the front room, the dinign room, in front of the patio doors, outside the patio doors in the garden, the bottom of the garden, outside the fornt door, the front gate and then you are out in the outside world.

    Enjoy everything that comes with a pup and you can;t go wrong. There will be accidents, there will be damage and there will be frustration but not half as much as the stuff the pup has to pup up with us putting on them.

    Food wise I feed mine raw or CSJ with a mixer of stuff like scrambled eggs, sardines, wet food and left overs.

    Get some pics up and good luck.
     
  10. Bijou

    Bijou PetForums VIP

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  11. leoti

    leoti PetForums VIP

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    Well come to the world of border collie pups lol mine is nearly 7 months old, my advice to you if you havent already is get enrolled in training classes,As regards behaviour, a good rule is not to let the puppy do ANYTHING at 6 weeks that you don't want him to do at 6 months or older. It's hard to be strict with a puppy when you first get it home. As humans, we feel sorry for the pup but puppies are not humans. If he's never done it – he won't miss it. He will, however, look to you for guidelines and consistency and both parties will be the happier for it if you make your puppy obey the rules from the word go. as you have already been told keep walking to two 5 min walks as you dont want to damage your puppies growth plates, as over excercising a border collie puppy will lead to a leggy apperance where the adult will have long spindly legs and poor bone.
    Games are essential for puppy development, physically, mentally and emotionally, but where toys are involved, you should always be able to win the prize at will .
     
  12. BekkiHannah

    BekkiHannah PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks guys you have been heaps of help !
    sorry i havent been on to reply ! i have just recently moved house and the comp is now up !.

    The pup is named MAX ! he is sooo adorable i shall put some pics up after i do this.

    He is not from a farm exactly but he is from an area woith lots of space and alot of other BCs and other animals !.

    I go to work every day, and so far i have left him in the garage ( its a big garage) due to he hates being outside alone? and crys non stop when put in the pen outside? My brother is usually home to take care of him but when he is not he is in the garage? how can i teach him to like his pen. i have left him in the for 20mins before while i was home but still non stop !

    He is the best dog . my lord soo adorable ! he seems very smart already yet he can be a bit over the top with nipping and all that sort of stufff!

    when ever he needs to go to the toilet he waits till i take him outside and walks straight to the grass ! which is brilliant ! he has made a few miss trips inside but i just ignor it and praise when he does it outside!.

    If i am not home through out the day too feed him 3-4 times a day will he be okay being fed just before i leave and when i get home?

    Thankyou guys heaps
     
  13. katiefranke

    katiefranke PetForums VIP

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    how long is pup left in the garage? it is a REALLY important time of their life at this age and they need to be out socialising and enjoying the world - meeting new people, seeing new things, experiencing kids laughter while they play in parks, noise form other animals, the sounds of a normal household (washing machine, hoover and TV etc)...before he has his vaccs all this can be done by carrying him around and then as soon as he has had vaccs and is able to he should be taken out all over the place - none of which can be experienced from inside a garage :(

    sorry if i have misunderstood - but pup is crying because he has been taken from his family and everything he knows and is now in a strange home with no company. the best thing would be to have a pen set up in the house somewhere where there will be people around. to make it nicer for him, make sure he has some water, some chew toys like kongs and a nice soft bed. also feed him is meals in there and play with him while he is in there and he will learn to like it (assuming the pen is of a decent size - as you mention the size of the garage but not sure how big the pen is?)

    collies are very smart, as you mention - but he will soon find his own amusement if you dont provide some for him...and it might not be things you find appropriate, so best give him something to do now that you do approve of. read the online puppy guide i posted earlier in the thread as it is full of info on appropriate pastimes for puppies (about chew toys etc) and about socialisation needed and also tips on bite inhibition which will help with the nipping.

    and no, pups have tiny tummies and need to be fed small amounts througout the day! please do not feed two big meals this early on...

    can i ask how long pup is left alone then if you are not there to feed him his meals? can you come home at lunch in the day?
     
  14. CarolineH

    CarolineH PetForums VIP

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    You are joking? :confused1: You cannot teach him to like his 'pen'. He is a BC puppy and as such he needs lots of companionship and someone (his owner) there to guide him in the preferred behaviours which you CANNOT do if you are not there. :confused:

    You have had lots of good advice here particularly from Hutch. Do the pup a favour and take that advice.

    Your brother caring for the pup when you are not there is better than nothing but sorry, if you want a collie to bond with you and learn how to be housetrained etc, shoving it in the solitary confinement of a garage or pen is not going to cut it.

    Look at my collie for instance. He is almost two years old and from a totally working bred background. He is loyal, affectionate and ultra responsive. He does as I ask when I ask him to. He will not run off from us when we are out because we are his world and we come before anything or anybody else. He had a deer spring out right in front of him last summer and instead of chasing it, he went straight back to my OH. He walks where there are rabbits as well as deer and he does not give a fig for them. Horse riders and other walkers can pass him safely because he will just totally ignore them in favour of us. He did go through a dreadfully long chewing phase but he never got to chew anything of value or importance because we were there to guide him away. :) He was housetrained at 3 months old. Anyone can examine him as he has been trained to stand still for that as well as for grooming. Why is he such a well trained collie? Because we have had time for him and have never shut him away for hours on end. :eek: He happily stays on his own when I need him to because he is content and knows that we will be back - in fact I think he appreciates the rest! My previous collie, also from a working background, was just the same behaviourwise except that he was a lot more grown up and calmer than Merlin is.


    Collies are fantastic dogs but they are not the dog you buy just to have a walk when you can fit one in between work and socialising/watching tv. They do not train themselves and learn bad habits as fast as they learn good habits. ;) But their owners will only get out of them what they take the time and trouble to put in. Left alone too much and denied proper socialisation, training and companionship they can soon end up screwed up and neurotic.:(
     
  15. leoti

    leoti PetForums VIP

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    You are at important time now in your puppy 's life could you not book some holidays and have some time off with him he is a baby taken from his mum and siblings and then you stick him in a pen all alone ask yourself how u would feel ? And he really needs more than 2 meals a day he is a growing puppy , when Max is in the garage what does he have to do out there ? This may seem harsh but you wouldnt stick a 8 week old baby in a garage while you went to work
     
    #15 leoti, May 11, 2010
    Last edited: May 11, 2010
  16. leashedForLife

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    i can only second the explanations above -
    a pup of any breed or mix cannot be left for 8-hours a day in a pen in a garage, plus Ur commute -
    whether that is a 15-minute walk or a 20-min bus-ride, its just more time alone.


    also, beyond the JAIL-time for 40-hours a week, garages are not safe as a residence for pets - they have nasty airborne chemicals, including that gas/oil fueled MOWER venting fumes in the corner -
    gasoline + petroleum fumes are *carcinogens* - IOW they cause cancer, in the mammal breathing them.

    garages are UNINSULATED and are *hot!* in summer, and *cold* in winter - the cold is miserable, but HEAT can kill.
    pups, just like infants and toddlers, * cannot control their own body-temperature as well as healthy adults can -
    so puppies are at more risk of over-heating + heat-stress or heat-stroke, than are adult-dogs.
    U are not there at 2 or 3-pm when the heat is at its worst, and have No Idea just how hot it was when U get home.
    heat-stress or heat-stroke can cause seizures, paralysis, and any other BRAIN damage U can name - blind, deaf, etc.
    it can also cause lifelong ORGAN damage - heart, lungs, liver...

    My suggestions -
    * put the puppy-pen in the HOUSE - where the temperatures are safe

    * find someone to come by at least once each working-day -
    preferably 2x, every 3 hours, as thats the very longest a young pup can WAIT between potty-trips...
    and BTW thats 3-hrs max WITHOUT triggers, which is not possible during the day,
    so leaving the puppy even with an every-3-hour drop-in will significantly slow-down housetraining -
    there Will Be more mistakes, which ARE * NOT the pups fault.


    i am sorry, but why did U get a PUPPY to stick in the garage?!
    or to leave in the yard, 40-hours a week?!
    neither one is apropos - an ADULT dog would already have some manners taught, is 95% likely already housetrained,
    and ** can be left for a working-day ** without major distress, as they are far-more independent than an infant.

    a rescue-BC would have avoided all this hassle -
    and Ur puppy is being neglected during a critical learning-period.
    U only have until 12-WO - thats 3-MO - as his primary socialization period, when learning about other living-beings
    and habituating to a human-environment is the EASIEST - from 3-MO to 6-MO is the secondary socialization period,
    but it takes 2x as much work, for 1/2 the outcome...
    considerably more effort for less accomplishment.

    see if U can get half-time for a couple of weeks -
    or find a puppy-creche where he can stay, with other pups, play + nap time, and HUMANS to teach him about life with ppl.
    arrange for a pet-sitter to come by 2x a day, to get him out for potty, play + some basic-training - a short leash walk, in the yard
    or on the sidewalk - MEETING ppl, meeting other dogs, seeing the world...
    he needs *time* + *enrichment*, not to be warehoused in the garage like a wind-up toy on a shelf.

    a puppy needs human contact + presence, far-more than an adult-dog...
    and a BC needs ACTIVITY not solitary-confinement for 40-hours plus travel, each week.

    good luck - finding someone ** before ** U had gotten the puppy would have been far easier;
    if U had mentioned U were going to keep the pup in the yard 40-hrs a week, many of the ppl who responded
    wold have immediately suggested either Don;t Get A Pup, get a rescue-adult,
    OR be sure to have someone(s) lined-up to get the pup out, socialized + habituated while U work.

    pups need TIME even more than they need high-quality food; OK-food with good face-to-face human-time is far better than
    a high-dollar, organic, human-grade ultra-nutrition diet, WITHOUT one-to-one human-time, IMO.

    i really wish U had mentioned leaving the pup on his own, during the work-day, when U first posted. :(
    if U cannot afford a pet-sitter drop-in for at least ONE trip per day,
    U cannot afford a puppy-creche or dog daycare,
    there is no relative or friend nearby to get the pup out of the HOUSE (not the garage) for potty, play + walks,
    no trusted neighbor to get the pup out each day at least once, preferably twice...

    then i would suggest that U call the breeder, explain the situation, and ask if THEY know someone to help -
    failing that, i would suggest returning the pup to the breeder, ASAP.
    rearing a puppy to 6-MO in the garage 40-hrs a week, THEN deciding this is too much work, is far worse than returning the pup *as soon as possible* to the breeder for re-homing.

    the younger the pup, the easier it is to find another home.

    i hope a relative, friend or neighbor can get the pup out, each day...
    --- terry
     
  17. CarolineH

    CarolineH PetForums VIP

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    To be fair Terry, she does state that the brother is when he is home but in my opinion, that's not good enough when a puppy is such a baby.

    If an owner wants a pup to bond with THEM then THEY have to be the one to be the major part in that puppys' life.:eek:
     
  18. leashedForLife

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    Sorry! :eek: i missed that part -
    i missed that entirely - so Brother can get the pup out?
    how many days each week is he home / available?
    if either Sis or Bro work close-enuf to home, one getting home at lunch, the other leaving work earlier, would cover 2 breaks each day.

    do U both leave at the same time, and return at the same time?
    if theres a way to stagger 2 visits, 3-hours apart, that could solve the weekday problem...
    fingers crossed,
    --- terry
     
  19. BekkiHannah

    BekkiHannah PetForums Newbie

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    Okay..Use are all seeming very harsh and i am finding it abit to much to handle due too i am NEW too this and yeah okay what ever all have your own opinions and what not im getting quite frustrated ive had a hard day at work and then reading al this has added !

    I have just asked my boss for some days off due to having the pup ! and i am trying to work out times for work to get around it to spend more time with him !.

    and my brother is home every day until 3 and i get home earlier or at the latest 4 !.

    I got a pup because my last BC was amazing and i have always wanted to raise one myself ! Max is gawjuz and i will make the time for him!.

    'CarolineH personally im glad your BC IS SOOOO WELL TRAINED but that is no use to me concidering max is a pup and you only told me what your BC does and how well trained he is because your such a geat owner . not how you trained him !..'

    U can all have your say and tell me i shouldnt have got him if i work 40 hours a week and bla bla bla fair enough im sure many of you guys work more than 40 hours a week and my hours vary ! i could work for 6-4 one day and 6-12 the next ! /

    I would never neglect max ! and i have taken him too parks and i he has met friends dogs and other people and is scared of them or pays no attetion when they walk passed ! and i realise he would be scared because he does not see other dogs everyday but i will not force him to sit with another dog if he is scared ! i find that gruilty !. he can see them and if he is not scared or the dog is not 10x bigger than him then i will let them get too know eachother !..

    :mad:

    Also i did not get a pup to sit in A FRIKEN GARAGE! i got a pup because i adore BCs always wanted a pup and i want to bring him up. im sorry i have to work to be able to BUY HIM FOOD AND A BED AND A KENNEL ETC. and i would put him in a pen outside but if it rains then it floods and i dont want that. and a pen in the house ? what with a baby fence thing taht he can crawl out of? or a ping pong table layed down on its side making a bigger pen that he could most prop find a way out of.
    :mad:

    He has many chew toys and always has dry food! i feed him before i leave my brother feeds him during the day if he has finished all the food from the morning and when i get home and before i go to bed.:mad:

    Im sorry i dont not live up to a bc pups owner too you guys but i will do my best with max.
     
  20. katiefranke

    katiefranke PetForums VIP

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    Hi bekkihannah, yes of course others have to work, but we thought about it BEFORE getting the pup so that we had the time off right away. i am not being harsh, i am just pointing out facts. I actually didnt get a dog again until i was in the right situation - i.e. me and my OH can work from home whenever we need or take her to my OHs office and we work 20-30 mins away from home so can go back at lunch etc too if we ever did leave her. i know i am very lucky to be able to do this.

    fair enough, whats done is done and you cant change that, but please put all that aside and read the advice that has been given - it is for Max, and as you unfortunately couldnt find the info before getting the pup it just means you really need to do some catching up and quick.

    the placement of the pen is not so much the issue other than the fact that in the garage AND outside, the pup would not get much interaction - thats why in the house is better. why can he climb out of a pen in a house but not in the garage? we bought one of these for cheap off ebay and it is brilliant: Babydan Playpen - Details Images & Prices as you can open the right out as room dividers and pen off a large corner. pup shouldnt have to be in there all day anyway, only really to sleep and for some time outs etc and when you cant watch him.

    a pup of this age shouldnt really be afraid of dogs, they should be inquisitive and bouncy and want to investigate. however, saying that if the dog is very pushy or not well behaved and is MUCH larger than pup then obviously you need to make sure the meetings are on lead and you need to build up to the pup liking all sorts of dogs. use something really yummy for the pup like small pieces of cooked chicken and feed them too him and play games etc round other dogs, to make him associate them with good things!

    the book i suggested about The Perfect Puppy and the dogstardaily link in my first post are excellent resources for a well-trained puppy and will give you all the basics. Hutches post also has a huge amount of info in it and well worth a read.

    teaching a 'settle' cue is a much needed training exercise with a BC, so i will find some info on that to post for you...

    ...but most of all you need to be there with him as much as pos...i know you said your brother is there most days, but is he actually interacting with the pup? from what you wrote it didnt sound like it...it sounded like he was in the pen in the garage and your brother might just pop in every so often for feeding etc.

    can you enrol on a puppy socialisation and training course with pup? this will be an excellent way for pup to meet other dogs in a controlled way and start off some basic training. it is very good for new puppy owners as most importantly it will teach YOU how to train your pup...and the trainer will be someone you can ask advice of if you have any problems.

    you mentioned the biting too - this is something you MUST work on, as BCs can be notoriously nippy anyway, so it is very important to teach bite inhibition - another reason why pup needs a lot of positive interaction to be able to teach this, as the window for when he can learn quickly and easily is closing as he gets older. some good info on this thread here: http://www.petforums.co.uk/dog-training-behaviour/45772-help-nipping-pup.html

    also a toilet training thread here which i thought would be of info - obviously if you cannot be there all the time it will be a little harder, but this is where your brother could come in too, so make sure you tell him all the things he needs to do while you are not there! :) http://www.petforums.co.uk/dog-training-behaviour/75317-housetraining-your-pup-older-dog.html

    finally, i really do wish you the best of luck, as do im sure all the other guys who have posted on here - ok so you have started off a bit wrong, but if you can change it now, then brilliant and hopefully if nothing else our posts will explain the importance and urgency of socialisation, bite inhibition, training etc. please do post any specific questions as you go along - and we will try and offer as much advice as we can.
     
    #20 katiefranke, May 12, 2010
    Last edited: May 12, 2010
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