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Garlic?

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by CheekoAndCo, Jun 27, 2009.


  1. CheekoAndCo

    CheekoAndCo PetForums VIP

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    I remember reading somewhere if you give your dog garlic capsuals it can help with fleas. If we see a flea on Cheeko we give him johnston flea tablets (99% sure that's the make) and we don't see them again for awhile but they are pretty expensive soo I was just wondering if it is true about the garlic because I think it would work out cheaper if it actually works.
     
  2. ninja

    ninja PetForums VIP

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    both mine get a small piece of garlic once a week in their food and have never had fleas and i dont use any other type of repellent :), x
     
  3. CheekoAndCo

    CheekoAndCo PetForums VIP

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    Thanks. I'm thinking of making doggy biscuits with garlic in them so hopefully they'll have the same effect :D
     
  4. sammyben

    sammyben Guest

    Its because the garlics leaks out the pores and the fleas dont like the smell/taste of it!

    It also helps for humans against midges :D x
     
  5. Stellabella

    Stellabella PetForums Senior

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    Does anyone know if it helps with ticks too?
     
  6. scosha37

    scosha37 PetForums VIP

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    I dont know ...but thinnking it might.:)


    My dad allways believed in Garlic for his dogs used it alll the time and his wee dog seemed to be fine but he did washing them mybe once a week as well..;)
     
  7. Dr.Marie

    Dr.Marie PetForums Member

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    It is actually not true that garlic will repel fleas! In fact, garlic is toxic to dogs. In small amounts it is unlikely to be too harmful, but given regularly, garlic kills red blood cells and causes anemia.

    Unfortunately fleas are difficult to kill! Most of the over the counter products are not 100% effective. This is definitely an area where it is worthwhile to spend the money to get a prescription product such as Advantage, Revolution or Frontline.

    Here is a good and reliable article on over the counter flea products:


    http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&S=0&C=0&A=626


    Dr. Marie
    Online Veterinary Advice
     
  8. carol

    carol PetForums VIP

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    ive given garlic for years and years never had any troubles with flea,s never used anything else,
     
  9. Bobbie

    Bobbie PetForums VIP

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    I thought it was onions that dogs can't have but a small amount of garlic was o.k I know garlic is added to liver cake. Plus my dog has Come On herbs added to his meal and this has garlic in I showed them to my vet and she said they were fine.
     
  10. alphadog

    alphadog PetForums VIP

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    My head is spinning with all the talk of garlic! I've been feeding garlic to my dogs for years and I'd really like to know the definative answer, as I'm sure we all would - Garlic..... Good or Bad?

    I was interested to read Dr.Marie's comment about garlic causing anemia and I panicked a little, but then I remembered this article I read a while ago....

    "Garlic, the Facts, by Lisa S. Newman, ND, Ph.D.

    "When it comes to your pet's health, do you want to follow facts or fears? Unfortunately, garlic has come under attack. This is primarily as a result of garlic's close cousin onion's reputation for triggering hemolytic or "Heinz factor" anemia (where circulating red blood cells burst) through its high concentration of thiosulphate. With onions, a single generous serving can cause this reaction. Garlic simply DOES NOT CONTAIN THE SAME CONCENTRATION of this compound! In fact, it is barely traceable and readily excreted (not stored in the body).

    Despite this fact, garlic is falling victim to mass hysteria spread through the internet. Yes, there are 51,174 sites devoted to warning about the "toxicity" of garlic, this hysteria has even prompted the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center to place a warning on garlic although there is little scientific data to back this claim other than the fact that thiosulphate is also found in garlic. Yet, there are also over 400,000 sites still proclaiming its benefits, many of them from reputable holistic veterinarians who have widely used garlic in their practice for many years! How can an herb suddenly turn so bad?!

    There is no doubt that onion, due to its concentration of thiosulphate, will cause Heinz factor anemia. In addition, as stated by Wendy Wallner, DVM, "Onions are only one of the substances which can cause Heinz body anemia. Other substances such as Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and benzocaine-containing topical preparations can also cause Heinz body anemia in the dog." The latter probably accounts for many cases as it is prevalent in creams often recommended for allergy-suffering pets due to its ability to numb the itch. It is absorbed through the skin and builds up in the blood stream. This other substance is likely to have been involved in cases where garlic was suspect.

    For centuries, as long as humans have been using herbs, garlic has been a primary remedy turned to in a majority of cases. For as long as people have been using garlic, they have also been feeding it to their animal companions. Its properties have proven far reaching, easy on the body and safe to use. In the past fifty years, during the rebirth of holistic medicine in the United States, garlic has been in the forefront. Every text that I have researched on herbal health which mentions pet care has recommended it, especially for its incredible anti-parasitic and anti-septic properties. In my own experience, garlic has also benefited pets with cancer, diabetes, liver, heart and kidney disease, uncontrollable staph infections and a host of other conditions, as well as been a staple in my recommended preventative protocols. It has been widely used by hundreds of thousands of pet owners with no reported negative side-effects - except its effect on their animal's breath - until now. This is the point; garlic has suddenly become a "suspect," not proven the culprit. Do not let mass hysteria determine a holistic care program for your dog or cat. Follow hundreds of years of "proven use" rather than recent "suspicions" in regards to this miracle herb, as garlic is known to be. As with anything, do use garlic in reasonable doses, and do know that you can trust history over hysteria.

    Since 1982, Dr. Newman has been a world renowned pioneer in the field of natural pet care. The author of nine books."


    Is the Veterinary world at logger heads over garlic, or is there a hard and fast rule?
     
  11. Dr.Marie

    Dr.Marie PetForums Member

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    Interesting discussion! I did some research to get some facts for us.

    You are right that onions are definitely more toxic than garlic. However, garlic still does have a toxic effect on red blood cells of dogs and even more in cats. In small doses it is very unlikely to cause serious harm. So, if you have a dog treat or food that is flavoured with garlic it will not hurt. (However, I would not give these treats to your dog if your dog already has issues with anemia).

    For some reason certain breeds are more sensitive to garlic than others. Japanese breeds of dogs can only tolerate smaller doses. Cats are very susceptible to Heinz body anemia that can be caused by garlic and onions.

    I did find cases in the archives of dogs who had Heinz body anemia from ingesting larger amounts of garlic. One was a dog who had eaten two cloves of garlic.

    So, after spending a good amount of time reviewing scientific articles and case studies here are the conclusions I have made:

    • in very small doses garlic is not likely to be harmful
    • garlic should not be given in any dose to an animal with anemia problems
    • garlic should not be given at all to cats

    I did find an interesting article that showed that people would have fewer insect bites if there was a large amount of garlic in their system. So, there seems to be a degree of truth in the fact that garlic may help to repel fleas. (However, it doesn't kill fleas, it just may decrease the amount of bites).

    My concern, though is that people will read that garlic repels fleas and will give large amounts of garlic to their pets. We really don't know the toxic dose of garlic (5g/kg has been suggested) and each dog seems to have a different susceptibility.

    Does that clear things up at all?

    Dr. Marie
    Online Veterinary Advice
     
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  12. Natik

    Natik PetForums VIP

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    i always thought just like above in small amounts garlic is ok but if given to much garlic it can harm the dog.
     
  13. borderer

    borderer Guest

    i have a 14 year old dog he has had garlic everday of his life he is still fit and healthy never had fleas:D
     
  14. alphadog

    alphadog PetForums VIP

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    Thank you very much for doing all the leg work DrMarie! I'll buy into the theory that everything is good for you in small doses (except chocolate which is bad for my dog in any dose, but great for me especially large doses :ihih:) and I'll carry on using garlic in treat recipes only. Personally I don't use garlic as a flea repellant for the doglets, just as extra flavour and whiffiness in treats to enhance training
     
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