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Fostering.Staffies and greyhounds

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by kathateria, Nov 25, 2012.


  1. kathateria

    kathateria PetForums Member

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    I am starting to foster.It seems the above breeds are in most need.i had a king charles foster,last time,and have a Jack russell of my own.
    So very different breeds.
    What 'special needs' do these dogs need,and why?

    For example,greyhounds and the wide collars,and every staffy pic i see,the dog has a harness on. is it because they pull so much?
    What other traits do i need to know about?
     
  2. laurahair

    laurahair PetForums Member

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    greyhounds need a wide collar (the width of 2 neck vertebrae) because should they decide to take off at a sprint a normal collar could break their neck.
    Other than that, as a greyhound owner I wouldn't say they have particularly special needs, a couple of 20 mins walk a day and do not leave any food out AT ALL as a common greyhound hobby is counter surfing ;) Oh and bin dipping is a favourite too. In racing kennels whatever food is given to them is theirs so they can be very food orientated. That does help with training though!
    They have short fur and thin skin so need coats when it is chilly and raincoats too. They often have bare bony bits so need a good big comfy bed-duvet is ideal, though I do have a dog mattress with zip off washable cover which my dog loves.
    As a big chested breed bloat is something to be aware of, have a scan through the sticky there is lots of good info there.

    That's the greyhound basics covered i think, though I'm sure more knowledgable people will be along soon :)
     
  3. kathateria

    kathateria PetForums Member

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    Thank you.
    Someone told me they might try and pick up my jack russell,as bait.have you ever heard of this happening?
     
  4. Rah

    Rah PetForums Senior

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    The wide collar is simply because they have slim heads, and other collars are generally easier to slip out of because of this. They're called Martingales, if you need to purchase one.

    Greyhounds are not a particularly hyper breed but mental stimulation would be great if you have a retired greyhound that you're fostering. It might be a little hard at first because they're not usually used to toys, so ensure to reward natural treats such as cheese and lots of praise.

    Don't allow him off lead off lead unless you're in and enclosed space like a garden.

    If you're unsure how your foster greyhound would react to other dogs or people I suggest using a muzzle on walks just in case. If its a retired greyhound it would be used to wearing one of these anyway, and will probably get excited that they're going out to do their thing :eek:

    Hope this helped.

    Good luck in your fostering. I hope it's very rewarding.


    SJ
     
  5. laurahair

    laurahair PetForums Member

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    Some greys are small dog friendly, some are not. Mine is fine with all dogs, even very tiny ones but very much NOT cat friendly or other small furry (i have to keep our hamster well away from her). My local greyhound re-homing charity carefully cat-test and dog-test all hounds before re-homing but care should be taken.

    I always walk mine with a muzzle (because of the non cat friendly thing), but ex-racers associate muzzle with walk so it's generally a positive. A sensible precaution I would say.

    Also be aware that coming from kennels they are not house trained, however generally very clean animals it does not take long even with older adults.
     
  6. BoredomBusters

    BoredomBusters PetForums VIP

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    Some Greyhounds will see small dogs in the distance and mistake them for small prey - mine does this sometimes, but as soon as she gets close and realises it's a dog she gets bored and wandered off. See the photo in my sig - 3 small dogs and 1 Grey!

    When I introduce her to very small dogs I usually pop her muzzle on, but she doesn't really need it - it's more to reassure the owners of the other dogs. They'e more in danger from the Daxie quite frankly. ;)

    If the rescue know you have a small dog they can be aware of what dogs to give you - there is a big demand for dogs who have been in homes and returned not to go back to kennels, but foster homes, so there will be some history. You would probably be expected to take your dogs to meet any potential fosters as a novice fosterer anyway.

    I've walked a lot of staffie and staffie crosses, and they've all been offlead and just with a collar - if they've had a harness it's just a no pull harness. I think owners see other staffies in these big chunky harnesses so are inspired to get their own.

    Greys need a wider collar to 'spread the load' if they suddenly take off at speed or lunge, they've got long throats that need protecting. They, and some staffies, may need a 'martingale' collar as their heads are often smaller than their necks, so need to be careful they don't reverse out. An alternative to the martingale for the Grey is to have a Greyhound collar that buckles up tight (and I mean very very snug) right up behind the ears.

    I found my Grey and the others I've boarded aren't thieves, they can learn, if taught, that not all the food they see is theirs any longer, although if you're fostering straight from racing you might find you have to do the training! My Beauty will raid the bin though, if she gets a chance.

    They like to lay on their backs with their legs in the air, so a comfy sofa or large bed is a must - and as mentioned, they get cold easily so if you have the heating off at night they may need a loose coat/jumper to keep the warm once it gets freezing overnight.

    Well done for thinking of these breeds!
     
  7. Freyja

    Freyja PetForums VIP

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    If you are fostering from a rescue then they would obviously have to know about your JRT. Therefore they should test any dog to make sure it is small dog friendly before you take the rescue home also your dog should meet the new foster before hand too.

    My ex racer lives quite happily with my chihuahua's and italian greyhounds who vary for 8" tall to 15" tall. She came to me straight from her trainer so we were lucky really saying that I didn't have the chi's or iggies when we first got Button and we already knew she was ok with snmall dogs before we got them.
     
  8. kathateria

    kathateria PetForums Member

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    they know about Milo,as the homechecks have been done:D
     
  9. AmberNero

    AmberNero PetForums VIP

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    Greyhound = say goodbye to your sofa ;) Greyhounds have been covered, so staffies: My SIL has fostered staffies and my BIL has two, they are full of fun, very quick to bond with you, can pull, and can really throw themselves into pulling :rolleyes: But mainly fun, strong dogs with a lot of love. Oh! and all of the fosters have been table-jumpers! so they can be very agile when it comes to finding food to snaffle!
     
  10. kathateria

    kathateria PetForums Member

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    Bobby,the king charles,was the worse food snatcher,i have ever known.
    (And I have had a Labrador!)

    He would have anything.Even santas mince pie,off the mantle piece!
    I caught him on the dining table,eating the remainders out of the cottage pie pan.
    He ate the lads christmas chocolate,through the plastic net,and even through the foil packets,without splitting the net open:confused: How is that even possible?
     
  11. tiatortilla

    tiatortilla PetForums VIP

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    every staff i've known has been a climber, tia spends more time on tables/chairs/windowsills than on the floor, i'm sure. also really food orientated, so yeah, watch out for that! there is a possibility of dog aggression though not as likely as some think. they're a great breed and will give you so much love! good luck with whichever you end up with! :)
     
  12. tiatortilla

    tiatortilla PetForums VIP

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    just remembered another one, staffies need REALLY tough toys as they're usually very determined chewers!
     
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