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Foster cat behaviour

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by RedPanda3, May 6, 2020.


  1. RedPanda3

    RedPanda3 PetForums Junior

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    Hi,
    I currently own a 19 year old cat. Within the year, I am going to foster some cats from my local rescue. I have a large catio for the cats. My current cat is a rescue and we have been super lucky. She doesn't scratch the furniture, she does her business outside etc. Therefore I have no experience with more 'problem' cats, which it is likely the foster kittens will be. Any tips on cat-proofing, or correcting behaviours? Thank you.
     
  2. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    The usual practice when fostering kittens for a Rescue is to keep them in one good sized room until they leave you, and not to allow any contact with your own cat.

    It is much easier to cat proof one room than a whole house. Ideally the room would not be carpeted, as this makes it easier to clean up food spills or toilet accidents. It also means there is no carpet for the kittens to damage with scratching. If you don't want to remove existing carpet I recommend putting down a number of inexpensive rugs on top of the carpet while the kittens are with you. Washable rugs would be ideal.

    A couple of cat trees will be useful to answer the kittens need to climb.

    Several scratch posts, and lots of scratch pads (made of cardboard) will be needed so they can exhibit natural scratching behaviour.

    Open litter trays - one more than the number of cats, e.g. 2 kittens, 3 litter trays, 3 kittens, 4 litter trays etc. If you use clay litter make it non clumping, it is safer in case the kittens lick any of their paws and swallow it. Clumping clay litter is dangerous for baby cats as it can cause a blockage in the intestines if they swallow it, needing surgery.

    If you use a cereal based litter it should be OK to use clumping litter. If the Rescue will be supplying the litter they will probably give you wood pellets which are very cheap (and most Rescues use them for that reason) . Not all cats like using wood pellet litter though.

    Cat beds - off the floor if possible. When I was fostering I used a spare bedroom and left the bed in there, a chair and the wardrobe. I removed everything else so there was little for the kitties to damage. I covered the bed with a waterproof mattress cover and put fleeces on top for the kittens to lie on.

    Mats for their feeding dishes. Flat plates to help them to get to their food more easily but little kits may get their paws messy with food. Par for the course - you just clean them up after with a warm damp flannel.

    It is probably best to ask for advice with any behavioural problems as they arise. You may find there are no problems anyway. :)

    Fostering kittens is a wonderful experience but it can be hard to part with them when the time comes.
     
    RedPanda3 likes this.
  3. RedPanda3

    RedPanda3 PetForums Junior

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    Thanks for the help!
     
    chillminx likes this.
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