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focus braking...

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by gizzmo341, Mar 23, 2011.


  1. gizzmo341

    gizzmo341 PetForums Junior

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    i have a terroir dog she is 1 this month and i have no idea how to brake her focus when she she's something she want a toy, cat, blade of grass some days lol, she has the best focus i have every come a cross, i have tried:

    "special treats" (she fav treat and only when she looks at me),

    squeaky toys (squeaky to get her attenion then get the toy or a treat),

    whistles (blow and walk the oppsit way, and blow to get attenion and treat)

    a personal alarm to shock her away and walk off (i did not like this but it was that or end up in a fight!)

    a hissing spray and walk off

    calling her name and walking off

    stand a wait it out but after 15mins of staring at a light on the floor i was bored she still haddent buged a inch

    any ideas on what to try next?
    because the her staring to want to go play with that nice friendly dog other the road makes it turn or if i don't get her there quick anoth then she turns on the dog
     
  2. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

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    Giving you attention is something you should train, preferably starting from puppy stage. My pup was very intent on what he was doing, and things like time outs in crate did not work as he would be immediately back on it. The thing that really sorted this, was rewards based obedience training. That got him used to giving attention and breaking off what he was doing.

    With a 1 yr old dog, you may find food motivation is lower, praise and play more. It may be quite hard to instill so start the work in a low distraction environment, where your rewards are proportionately higher than those outside, then move to enclosed outdoors space, and finally the streets and parks; so you build up and proof, patiently and with persistence.

    All the startling things, like whistles* and hisses, probably initially work well, but the dog soon realises what's going on and learns to ignore them; so unless you put something positive in place to regain attention then you move from quick fix to quick fix. None of these quick fixes, build your dog's trust in you, or help your bond with it.

    Remember, Terriers are bred to be working hunting dogs and to act independantly rather than be under close supervision, so it is harder for them and thus takes more effort, but there are some very well trained Terrier type dogs about so it is doable. Last night Victoria Stillwell's show featured 2 Terrier Crosses who were at least a yr old, and did not even know their name, just basically being left to amuse themselves in a yard. They took to training excellently despite not being the main featured dog in the show (it was a toy poodle who hated males). She would get attention to her, by using a squaky voice when one of the Terriers was engrossed in sniffing something in a hole, that had been dug.

    I've now seen your post http://www.petforums.co.uk/dog-training-behaviour/154451-not-sure-if-i-can-do-2.html#post2313212 so I see you have been working on this already. The thing is chopping & changing "quick fixes" like air blasts, whistles and other crazy stuff is not exactly going to help calm a nervous dog.

    If your dog is nervous, it's very important that you are calm, consistent and gentle; so keep working on it and slowly build up the distractions. If you play a game like tug, then build in pauses to help impulse control and avoid over excitement ie dog drops when you loosen the tension, then wait and then give command to signal another pounce.

    * Whistles obviously have there place for distance work, it's the usage to startle at close range in this context
     
    #2 RobD-BCactive, Mar 24, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2011
  3. gizzmo341

    gizzmo341 PetForums Junior

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    she is not a nervous dog, she has the terrior mind set! she just has a death stare she has been in training all her life (i have strong belive's training a dog is a life long thing, and bonding thing too), her focus on a day to day basis with things is fantasic but if that thing has got her attention then you might as-well hit your head on a brick wall it will give you more attention than the dog will i do training i diffrent enviroments (i.e. at dog training, town centre, a field, on a train or bus, at the beach)
     
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