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Floppy pasterns and cow hocks?

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by caterpiller, Jun 28, 2020.


  1. simplysardonic

    simplysardonic Moderator
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    For me it's turned out 'Queen Anne' front feet, not sure what the technical term is but it's seen a lot in smaller dogs.
     
  2. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Oh what are those? You'll have to explain LOL!

    Sadly no. Some of the illustrated breed standards are helpful, but really most of what I know is from working with a horse vet back in day who happened to be an expert on lameness, and he would drop tidbits about conformation. Really just picking the brains of anyone around who seemed to know what they were talking about.
    I then tried to transfer what I knew of horses to dogs, which kind of does and kind of doesn't always work. Dogs are built for different things, so in one breed a straighter rear is desirable for a powerful burst, but in another breed good balanced angulation is more desirable for stamina. The roached back of a greyhound serves a purpose that in a breed like a foxhound would not. It gets complicated LOL

    Best thing I know to do is go to big dog shows with someone who knows their stuff and ask lots of questions. Pictures are great, but seeing a dog moving like in the ring really gives you better context for how it all works together.
     
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  3. simplysardonic

    simplysardonic Moderator
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    I'll use pictures as it explains it better! Seen them called 'ten-to-two', 'fiddle fronted' & 'Easty-Westy'
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  4. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Oh yuck! Yeah, no... Sheesh!
     
  5. Torin.

    Torin. PetForums VIP

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    So a fair amount of that with small dogs is confo (it was the main thing I was avoiding when I was dog hunting). But. Often it is also actually a nail length issue. It'll be partly coincidence of course, but all those example dogs have overgrown nails. Turning the wrist out gives a slightly increased legnth between nail bed and the floor than straight on, especially for the inner toes. Dogs with lower body weights being more prone to overgrown nails and all also makes it a bit harder to tell whether it's cause A, cause B, or both.
     
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