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Flea treatments poisoning rivers

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Sarah H, Nov 19, 2020.


  1. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    https://www.theguardian.com/environ...OLDDSl4BSVRTPqJ7xa4U0raojq_xhueVqa-DFb5HcUoww

    Guardian article on how spot on flea treatments are polluting our rivers.
    The insecticides used are extremely potent and highly toxic.

    To me this is really concerning. I have stopped using spot ons in recent years because Nooka hated them, and I found the tablets were much easier to use for all the dogs and didn't like having the stuff on their skin to be honest. I only really treat if I see fleas too, so they aren't over-used. And this article is promoting the same, only use them when you actually need to, and ban Fipronil and Imidacloprid based treatments (which have been banned for use on farms for a few years now).
     
  2. ForestWomble

    ForestWomble PetForums VIP

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    That is very concerning.
    I haven't used spot ons since Bungo was a pup as I had an allergic reaction to them, so we use tablets which is much easier all round.
     
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  3. picaresque

    picaresque Mongrelist

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    I was vaguely aware of these spot ons being harmful to aquatic life but to my shame I didn’t really think much about it.
    I mostly use Advantage once or twice a year as I have/had dogs that pick up fleas quite easily. What are the best veterinary grade flea tablets out there I could use as an alternative?
     
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  4. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    I don't know what the best tablet is. I just get a few at the vets when I go. I think it's Easecto or something? Same as Bravecto but under a different company name. To be fair mine very rarely get fleas, but I do give them during flea/tick season.
     
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  5. picaresque

    picaresque Mongrelist

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    Thanks, I’ll look into those. For some reason I used to associate flea tablets with ineffective Bob Martin type products.
    I still have a pipette of Advantage from a multipack that I will use when Gelly next needs treating but I’ll avoid spot on from then on.
     
  6. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    The directions on the spot-on I use (Advantix) is to keep the treated dog out of water for 3 days, and I've always stuck to that, or more. I only use it once or twice a year in tick season, though now I'm rarely going to the most tick-infested places I used to frequent. I'm reluctant to use something internal like Bravecto/Easecto, and surely breakdown products from those must be excreted in the dogs' pee or poo, and get into the environment?
     
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  7. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    Did they take into account things like sheep dip, or the stuff they spray on cattle and horses, which I guess also gets into water courses eventually?

    Not looking for excuses; the stuff I use on my dog has warnings for the animal to not go in water for 48 hours after application, and I understand that one reason for this is because within this time it can just wash off and cause pollution. I suppose it still goes on washing off, but not at the same rate.
     
  8. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    That's something I never thought when we had Amber and Dillon, I was aware that you shouldn't put their fur out for the birds to line their nests with but never thought about what it would do to water.
     
  9. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    This is why i dont use anything. Never had fleas, and ticks are easy to remove.

    I would have assumed its common sense to realise that every time we use some sort of chemical that it will have an impact on the environment.

    I raised this issue with Hurtta as they released some products designed to be worn in water, impregnated with Permethrin (lethal to aquatic life and cats) and they chose to ignore me.
     
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  10. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    I thought the same. It was more that fact that 99% of samples had fipronil in them (which we all know is used in some flea treatments) which has been banned for use on farms for years, so could only have come from pets. I'm sure there are plenty of other farm chemicals in rivers, but this article was specifically about the use of chemical spot ons for pets, and how we should change our habits of routinely treating monthly, to only treating when we see fleas. I know people who do use monthly spot ons their pets and have done for ever.

    I dread to think the stuff that gets into the rivers from farms!
     
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  11. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    A lot of Vets now do monthly payment plans which include a monthly flea treatment; I don’t know if these treatments are ‘weaker’ than they used to be or if they’re encouraging us to overdose.

    I do my dog with flea/tick drops just twice a year (2 x yearly trips to Exmoor) and I’ve never seen a flea on him.
     
    Sarah H likes this.
  12. Sairy

    Sairy PetForums VIP

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    Very interesting and worrying article. I don't routinely treat for fleas. For a few years I treated all the animals once in spring after we had a dreadful outbreak one year, but I don't think I shall bother anymore.
     
  13. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Bates can't tolerate spot-ons, so I've always given him pills. But I only treat if there is reason to, if I see flea dirt or actual fleas which is rare. I think I've treated Bates for fleas maybe 3 times in 12 years?
    I treated Penny when we first got her, (also pill) and haven't since.
     
  14. FletchNo1

    FletchNo1 PetForums Member

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    I can count on one hand the number of times I've used wormers/flea treatments in the last 20 years on 5 cats and four dogs. Number of times I've had ticks/fleas/ worm infestation - once.
     
  15. El Cid

    El Cid PetForums Senior

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    Cannot be that bad, the spot on treatments dont always kill the fleas, so diluted should have a much lower effect.
    Maybe its a story made up by the people that produce the edible tablets.
    I dont see how the edible tablets dont contain similar ingredients that kill fleas etc.
     
  16. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    It's well known that fleas are becoming more and more resistant to fipronil based products (Frontline is the main one that springs to mind) so they have to make them very potent to kill the fleas. Just because dogs don't react to it doesn't mean it's not polluting our waterways. Have you ever read the leaflet inside a spot on? It's not nice reading.
    No one's denying that other things get into rivers, but what's been found is extremely high levels of toxins specifically used in spot ons for dogs and cats. Fipronil and imidacloprid are not used in flea and tick tablets (probably because they are too toxic for ingestion) but as topical insecticides which are clearly damaging the environment.
     
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  17. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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  18. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Seriously? Do you think these companies are so hard-up that they're going to invent a story just to boost their sales?
    Nevermind that often these companies are the *same* companies that make the spot ons.
     
    Sarah H likes this.
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