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Flea Allergy Dermititis / general itchy skin

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by Bella&Jinx’newmum, Nov 25, 2018.


  1. Bella&Jinx’newmum

    Bella&Jinx’newmum PetForums Newbie

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    Hi everyone, just looking for some advice if possible please. I have 2 cats both with FAD, one being more sensitive to the other. They are both treated with a monthly spot-on, Broadline, via the vet. The sensitive cat, Jinx, is just coming to an end of herr first major flare up since I adopted them. Jinx has had a steroid injection and following that has had steroid cream, Isaderm, applied twice a day which as made a huge difference albeit she is hating the cone of shame! We are on day 5 of the cream and 2 more days to go! There is no flea problem in the house. Just one pesky flea got through.

    I think she is generally a bit of an itchy cat so I picked up some ExmaRid Dry Skin Formula from Pets at Home, an oil which is added to their food. I added a little to their food tonight and they haven't turned their noses up at it. Has anyone had any experience of this or another product that may relieve day to day itching that they would recommend? Also, any product recommendations regarding flea spray for the home?

    Any advice, greatly appreciated.
    Thank you.
     
  2. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Hi @Bella&Jinx’newmum -

    Omega 3 fish oil can be very effective for cats with allergic skin disease. I give it to one of my cats who has controlled FAD and it has helped his skin stop being dry and itchy as it was when I adopted him 6 yrs ago. I give him krill oil or green lipped mussel extract because he is allergic to salmon.

    I haven't used starflower oil (the active ingredient of ExmaRid ) because it is not as well digested by cats as fish oil/krill oil. Also it contains Omega 6 and cats who are fed manufactured cat food already get plenty of Omega 6 in their food.

    My cat developed food allergies, triggered by the FAD. 5 years ago I put him on a structured 8 week elimination diet which identified he is allergic to beef, fish and chicken. Since then I have excluded those meats from his diet and he is fed a diet of single protein wet foods - turkey, lamb, rabbit, pork, kangaroo, duck, pheasant on a rotated basis so he never eats the same meat protein 2 days together. His dermatitis is well controlled. He has no dry food at all.

    His dermatitis was very bad at the time I adopted him - he was covered in scabs and sores, but I decided not to go down the steroid route because of my concerns about him becoming dependent on steroids long term, and the risk of Diabetes Type 2.

    Because I prefer to avoid putting any chemicals on his skin I recently stopped using the Advantage spot-on flea treatment and instead am giving him monthly doses of Program oral flea treatment. It stops the fleas breeding but doesn't kill adult fleas. So far so good.....and if I saw a flea on him I would treat him with a Capstar tablet ( which kills adult fleas and is active for 24 hours).

    I have never seen a flea on him, and hope I never do, but in the summer months I may decide to switch him to Bravecto spot-on flea treatment which is given every 3 months, which I prefer to a monthly treatment. .

    My cat doesn't need worming every month so I give him a Milbemax total wormer tablet every 3 to 4 months, crushed and mixed in his food.

    I usually treat my home with household flea spray once a year and use either Indorex, Acclaim or RIP Fleas, all of which are effective and can be bought from Amazon.
     
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  3. TIGGS1

    TIGGS1 PetForums Member

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    Itiggs seems to itch alot on his back near his back legs i have checked him for fleas nothing and also took him to vets and they found nothing so IWill try some fish oil as he could have dry skin so thanks chillmix
    I to dont use spot on treatment anymore when Ihad him i use spot on a couple of times and noticed it burnt his skin so for a few years now i dont flea him and if any fleas come in the house on the carpets etc I use acclaim household flea spray which is very effective infact Ihave never seen any fleas but i tend to use acclaim 1 or 2 times aweek cause it will kill other bugs as well as fleas.

    Ihave used a flea tab in summer and it was brill so flea tabs do work .

    Vet uk is a good site and very reasonable i get alot from there my household spray , worming tabs etc
    Tiggs1
     
    #3 TIGGS1, Nov 25, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
    Bella&Jinx’newmum likes this.
  4. Bella&Jinx’newmum

    Bella&Jinx’newmum PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks @chillminx and @TIGGS1 for commenting and sharing your experiences. I have wondered whether there could be a food sensitivity as well. Jinx has had a high temperature and vomiting at the same time as the FAD flare up - she isn’t a happy cat currently :Grumpy - so has been on Royal Canin Sensitive as I can’t get normal boiled rice and chicken in her so would be a good base to try different proteins on her.

    I have seen Indorex online so will give that a go as an extra layer of protection. I am also considering the Program injection every 6m.

    Thanks.
     
  5. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Hi, yes the Program injection is a good idea, I considered that for my boy but as he is not good with vet trips I felt the liquid each month was the better option for him.

    If your cat has vomiting, or diarrhoea, feeding small meals of poached white fish for 24 hours is a good way of settling the stomach.

    Trying out different meat proteins on an ad hoc basis is not really a good way to identify any food allergies. The results are too unreliable. Also, using food containing chicken (as RC Sensitive does) is not the best idea as your cat could be allergic to chicken. (beef, and chicken are the most common feline food allergens).

    It sounds as though your cat could be a good candidate for an Elimination Diet, if nothing else just to rule out the possibility he has a food allergy. The 1st stage of the diet is 8 weeks on a novel protein. Novel proteins are meat proteins the cat has never eaten before e.g. kangaroo, goat, horse, reindeer, venison. I used kangaroo for my cat's elimination diet.

    The novel protein is fed for 8 to 10 weeks, nothing else except water. This stage is to calm the immune system.

    Stage 2 is reintroducing other meat proteins, one every 3 weeks, as a challenge to the immune system, and keeping a log of symptoms.

    If you decide to go ahead with the Elimination Diet please post again and I can give you the links to the foods you will need. (none are available in the UK but can be bought online easily).
     
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  6. Bella&Jinx’newmum

    Bella&Jinx’newmum PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you. That’s a helpful overview. I’ll be back in touch when ready to proceed with it. I’m seeing the vetinary nurse on Saturday to discuss parasite treatment more broadly so will include the possibility of food allergies in there.
     
    chillminx likes this.
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