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First ever declaw ban

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by DogLover1981, Jun 6, 2019.


  1. DogLover1981

    DogLover1981 PetForums VIP

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    I posted this before but it got lost with the server outage. I didn't hear about the possible declaw ban until recently and I wasn't expecting this news. New York State may become the first state ever to have a state wide ban on declawing. The bill is waiting for the governor's signature or veto.

    A cat owner could, however, just bring their cat to another state to have their cat declawed. I don't see every single state banning the procedure anytime soon and I haven't seen a word about declawing in my home state. The declawing of cats isn't the most humane, IMO, and I did convince a friend not to have their cats declawed a while back.

    ABC news.
    https://abcnews.go.com/Lifestyle/wireStory/ny-state-ban-cat-declawing-63470535

    Associated Press on youtube.
     
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  2. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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  3. DogLover1981

    DogLover1981 PetForums VIP

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    #3 DogLover1981, Jun 6, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
  4. DogLover1981

    DogLover1981 PetForums VIP

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  5. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Prior to the 1950's perhaps most people in the USA and Canada let their cats have outdoor access, so indoor scratching of carpets etc was not so much of an issue?

    When I was a kid we had family cats who were always allowed outdoor access 24/7. This was usual in those days. My mother never provided scratching posts in the house for the cats and none of them ever scratched the carpets or the furniture. I would remember if they had done as my mother was house proud and super fussy about the carpets!
     
  6. NaomiM

    NaomiM Love my furry, feathered and finned family

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    Interesting @chillminx . I also grew up with cats who had 24/7 outdoor access, and both of them DID scratch carpets and furniture! They had scratching posts and did use them, but also scratched carpets and sofas. Ebony, who came to us as a rescue kitten when I was 12, used to have this trick of scratching the carpet right next to the base of the scratching post, as if she was hoping we wouldn't notice then :rolleyes: Now we have Pebbles, who has unrestricted outdoor access during the daytime and who also scratches sofas - usually when he's trying to get our attention in the hope of an extra meal! :rolleyes:

    Back on topic, though, fingers crossed that this ban will go through and will lead the way for other states!
     
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  7. Sacremist

    Sacremist Mum to 2 cats and a dog

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    When I lived with my parents, we always had cats with 24/7 access to the outdoors and they never scratched furniture.

    I have two cats now who are indoor only and they don’t scratch my furniture. I guess it depends on the cat.
     
  8. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    It depends on the humans and if they provide adequate scratching places for the cat, appropriate training, and a good healthy indoor environment. I'm sure you've done all that. so- no scratched furniture! :)

    There are two camps in the pro-declawers, the ones who believe the lies their vets tell, and the ones who are lazy and selfish and don't give a darn what feline toe amputation does to the cat, or both.
     
  9. Sacremist

    Sacremist Mum to 2 cats and a dog

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    I must admit I do have 5 scratching posts strategically placed all over the house and in an outside run. There are even more beds and they have separate feeding stations, plus 5 litter trays, so they have no need to compete or get stressed. Scratching, apart from sharpening their claws, can be stress related. My cats do not show signs of stress.
     
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  10. NaomiM

    NaomiM Love my furry, feathered and finned family

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    So how do you train a cat not to scratch furniture? Not being sarcastic here, I'm genuinely asking, as Pebbles has plenty of places to scratch and he does seem to do it more for attention than anything else! It's not a massive deal to me - the sofas are tatty already and the kids do as much damage to them as he does - but if/when we get new sofas some day, it would be nice to have some tricks up my sleeve!
     
  11. Sacremist

    Sacremist Mum to 2 cats and a dog

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    Cats have scent glands on their paw pads which they use for scent marking. Scent marking is something cats can do to calm themselves down and make them feel secure in their environment. I used to have a lot more cats and so each cat had less space and I did have issues with scratching. Since the numbers have depleted and they actually have far more resources than my two cats actually need, the scratching is now non-existent. I don’t think it’s about training really; it’s about making your cat’s environment to its liking and that could mean extra litter trays, beds, scratching posts, feeding stations and space - territory they can call their own. I live in a larger than average house, which we needed with a lot of cats. Now just two share it and clearly they feel it’s enough.
     
  12. MissMiloKitty

    MissMiloKitty PetForums VIP

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    Australia and other countries have banned Declawing and have a high percentage of indoor only cats but it hasn't stopped them adopting cats. 20% of British cats live indoors and I know of nobody who wishes that Declawing was legal. So, America is not the only country with indoor cats but it is the only country that has ever practiced Declawing on a large scale. I personally don't believe that indoor cats claw furniture more than outdoor cats anyway. Miss Milo claws less than my last cat, an outdoor cat called Gripper.

    I don't believe that banning Declawing will increase the rate of unwanted cats and euthanasia, I think that's just more Pro Declawing propaganda and emotional blackmail.
     
  13. MissMiloKitty

    MissMiloKitty PetForums VIP

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    You can't train a cat not to scratch. My cat hardly ever claws furniture. She never scratches the wallpaper. I have scratching posts and mats all over the house. I also have an internal front door mat which she like She cares nothing for the sofa because she's got so many scratching options.
     
  14. NaomiM

    NaomiM Love my furry, feathered and finned family

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    @MissMiloKitty I was picking up on @lorilu 's mention of training, because I wouldn't have said cats are trainable in that way either! Pebbles has lots of scratching options, though only one that he uses frequently (aside from the sofa arm!). He tends to only scratch the sofa when he has tried purring and head-bumping and rubbing and sitting on the computer keyboard and staring meaningfully at us and it hasn't resulted in more food!
     
  15. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Ensure that the scratchers provided are something the cat likes. Cats have different preferences. Pay attention to what he uses when, and in what position. Does he like to stretch tall and long? Scratch on horizontal/flat things? Diagonals? Does he like edges, or use the middle? Rough material (sisal or cardboard) or some other texture? Ensure all scratchers are sturdy and don't move, slide or wobble.

    Location matters. If a scratcher is being ignored, move it. Put it in front of the couch, for instance, especially if that is a piece of furniture being scratched.. Rub your hands on it to make it smell like you. Furniture can be protected and covered during training, that helps break the habit.

    Canada and the USA. If you read my thread you wil know that in the last 18 months 7 Provinces in Canada have banned it. Every government is different. In the US, some cities have banned it, which is a help, but not much. California was well on the way to banning, city by city, then the California Veterinary Medical Association got the state to pass a law that no more cities could ban declawing. The VMAs are powerful lobbying organizations. They are all about money. And declawing vets make enormous profit and don't want to give it up.

    Each state can make their own laws as well.

    She wasn't asking how to train them not to scratch, just how to not scratch the furniture. :)

    Cats need to scratch for many reasons. From a physical stand point it is so important for physical fitness. Scratching stretches and exercises a cat's entire body. Watch and see how all muscles and joints are worked with a good scratch! They also scratch because they are happy, or because they are stressed, to mark their scent, to communicate with humans or other cats, and because it's fun! And simply because it is an inherent instinctive behavior in a cat.

    I have been working on this cause for many many years. Some days it is so depressing I don't want to do it any more. I don't want to know, or hear about another cat mutilated or another vet putting out declaw coupons or another lazy selfish owner who claims their cat is "fine". But me, and many many others, keep on.
     
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  16. NaomiM

    NaomiM Love my furry, feathered and finned family

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    He likes to stretch up. He has no interest in horizontal scratchers. The one he uses most is his tall jumbo one - I should probably get another one or two of those as they're fairly cheap, but in a small house with three kids it's a case of finding space for them!

    I think that's the case with Pebbles - he does it to communicate!

    I think you're doing a great job. It's one of these "David and Goliath" scenarios when one side has the power and the money behind them. But you and the others who have been campaigning for so long are finally starting to see some progress now, so I hope that's some encouragement :)
     
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  17. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Here's a for instance: When my youngest cat came she developed a liking for the corners of my box spring that supported my mattress. I figured out that she likes to scratch on the edges of things. I covered the corners of my box spring with a cardboard box. I opened the box at one edge so it had a corner, and fit it around the corner of the box spring with the flaps tucked under the mattress. Now she no longer could scratch there, and I provided her with scratchers that gave her edges to scratch. She soon learned to enjoy the scratchers and eventually I took the boxes off the corners. I give her cardboard scratchers and tear off the slick fancy patterned paper on the sides, so she can scratch edges to her heart's content. I have one sisal, tall diagonal (she likes diagonal too), that also has edges.
     
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  18. NaomiM

    NaomiM Love my furry, feathered and finned family

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    Thanks for all the info. Some good ideas there to think about :)
     
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  19. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Another bit of advice I forgot to add is to incorporate scratchers into interactive Game time. Drag the string on a stick up the post, or along the curve to encourage kitty to dig his claws in. Pull it under the tunnel on the curved scratcher. If kitty likes flat scratchers pull the string enticingly under it, or use the other end of the stick, so you can get a good mysterious wiggle going under there. It's all in paying attention to what the cat likes and working off of that.

    If I sound a bit in lecture mode it's only because I say (or type, rather) these things a lot. :)
     
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  20. MissMiloKitty

    MissMiloKitty PetForums VIP

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    Sorry, I meant that you can't train a cat not to scratch the furniture. Maybe I'm just lucky and my cat doesn't scratch the furniture. It wouldn't bother me if she did though. I know scratching relieves stress and helps cats stretch. A de clawed cat must be very frustrated and confused. No matter how hard he tries, he cannot get satisfaction :(
    Yes, keep on fighting, never give in. It doesn't happen in my country but I do like to tell declawers what I think of them via the Internet.
     
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