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Finding a Pedigree Cat

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Tigermoon, Apr 30, 2017.


  1. faerienuff

    faerienuff PetForums Newbie

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    We did our research when we bought a Norwegian forest cat, they were a registered breeder and had won many competitions. We assumed this was indication of a good quality breeder.

    We lived a distance from the breeder so reserved the kitten and went to pick him up it was December and obvious that they had multiple litters for the Xmas period, it was like a supermarket procession of people visiting for kittens!

    When we got him home we separated from our other 3cats to give him time to get to meet them, when we visited the vets he was very underweight and riddled with ear mites, the breeders granddaughter had also painted the kittens nails with nail varnish which they had scrubbed off with remover which had damaged the nails, the vet thought there would be permanent damage.

    It took about 6 weeks to sort out the eat mites which delayed the whole integration process with his new brothers and sister. He’s now a beautiful cat and has recovered from his poor start but researching the breeder doesn’t always work!
     
  2. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @faerienuff - I think one can get a very good idea of whether the breeder is a good one by visiting them at home, seeing their set up, how they do things, and meeting their queens, before even deciding if one wants a kitten from them in future. It also gives the breeder a chance to size up possible kitten buyers.

    I did my research first, and went to cat shows to meet breeders. But it was the visits to each breeder's home that told me all I needed to know.

    Having made my choice of breeder I asked if I could go on their waiting list for 2 kittens from one of the shortly expected litters ( she had 3 breeding queens). The breeder agreed and 6 months later I had my two kittens. They were the most gorgeous cats, my soul mates, and they lived to the age of 18 and died within 3 weeks of each other.
     
  3. faerienuff

    faerienuff PetForums Newbie

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    Hi chillminx

    I agree it’s better to meet the breeder before hand if possible. I was trying to highlight that you can do you research on paper and the breeder looks good in terms of their registration and winning cats but when you buy a kitten this doesn’t necessarily add up. We have done both visited a breeder before hand and bought from a breeder we researched and looked good on paper and bought a pixie bob from a breeder we visited.neither came with official paperwork this was supposed to follow later and never did. The NFC breeder was winning all the shows in its category and looked like a top class breeder,

    Where breeders get you are you fall in love with your bundle of fluff as soon as you see them and to be honest I wouldn’t change any of my decisions now I have them.

    It does pay though to find an honest breeder who is interested in the cat above profit! And occasionally adopt a moggie or two
     
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  4. Rufus15

    Rufus15 Banned

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    Depending on how much of the claws were painting, I would suggest that it was perhaps the breeder's way of telling kittens apart. A lot of breeders use toxic-free, kitten-safe nail varnish on a claw or two to identify similar looking kittens in a litter. I'd be surprised if all of his claws were painted, a child wouldn't be able to hold a kitten still for long enough.

    Personally, I don't agree with it. I find it too risky and dangerous, even with safe varnishes, and I think it looks peculiar.

    I would also say that it's not unusual to have more than one litter at a time, and to have a lot of visitors in a short period when there are multiple litters. Breeders have lives too, and if you have 2 litters of 6, that's 12 families that will visit at least once and some will visit 2 or 3 times. That's a lot of time to set aside for the breeder.

    The ear mites and being underweight, however, are an issue. He shouldn't have been placed in a new home in that state, and the breeder is absolutely at fault
     
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  5. Tigermoon

    Tigermoon PetForums VIP

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    Researching breeders includes visiting them. Anyone can look good on paper but only a visit prior to choosing a breeder will tell you things such as how the cats are kept and whether they look healthy etc.

    When a litter is ready I try to have people come at very different times, such as one in the morning and one in the afternoon but sometimes it just isn't possible and you have to have people come at roughly the same time so they end up crossing each other. If you have a couple of litters ready at the same time it must be hard to manage all those eager new owners, some of whom like to stay and chat for hours!

    Nail vanish is a common way breeders identify kittens in a litter, especially if they are all the same colour, I'm actually surprised the vet wasn't aware of this practice. However the mite and parasite load is very poor. No breeder should have an infested cattery and certainly shouldn't be selling infected kittens.
     
  6. faerienuff

    faerienuff PetForums Newbie

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    Hi I appreciate that breeders can have multiple cats and litters at the one time, in my personal experience with one breeder it felt like the breeder had multiple litters to cash in on the Xmas market especially combined with the condition my kitten was in. He was the only all blue kitten that was available and the breeder said that the nails had been painted by the granddaughter so nothing to do with id. I’ve attached a photo of when he was a kitten and his back paw was bare of fur and three nails were damaged these eventually fell out at the root. He had an eye infection and really bad ear mite infection which took 6-8 weeks to clear up, he was supposed to have been vet checked and vaccinated a few days before we picked him up. The set up of outdoor cages at the cattery looked ok and by looking at him you wouldn’t have necessarily picked up any issues apart from the paw which the breeder pointed out and apologised about.

    All of the available kittens were playing in the one room so potentially they all had ear mites, I just felt bad for potential other owners who might have had the same experience as myself. I decided not to follow it up with the breeder as I didn’t think there would be anything to gain from it, we were going to provide the care he needed and I put I’d down to experience and something to check out for in future if I buy another cat from a breeder.

    It may just have been bad luck on my part and the breeder is very good normally and for all not the quiet perfect start to owning him he is now fit and healthy and we wouldn’t be without him
     

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  7. Rufus15

    Rufus15 Banned

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    Poor little chap, its shameful that he was allowed to live and be sold in that state. I'm very glad he's happy and well now
     
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  8. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @faerienuff - what a gorgeous boy he is now! :)

    I am shocked at your second photo of him as a kitten - in that state he looks like some of the sad, neglected rescued kittens we take in at the shelter! :( I am amazed a breeder would home him like that! But good for you for 'rescuing' him. :)
     
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  9. Ottery

    Ottery Cat Lady

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    I completely agree with the comments about how difficult it can be to find good breeders. You would think the internet would make it easier but I’ve had Burmese cats for over 20 years and it almost seemed easier pre-internet. Breeders often either don’t have a website, or it’s out of date, or just impossible to find. Even Facebook isn’t particularly helpful.

    Last year when I wanted two kittens, I looked at the cat club list but there were no kittens available in my region. I find it’s not always up to date either, with kittens still listed who have long gone. So I rang a breeder I’d had a previous kitten from and she was really helpful, she gave me a list of several other breeders and also rang two of them who had imminent kittens and ‘recommended’ me. I got one kitten from her (when we first spoke he was reserved by someone who then changed her mind) and another from one of her contacts.

    I agree there is no substitute for actually visiting the breeder and seeing the set up - and meeting the cats. I have always used registered breeders, and they have all been fine - except one, when we were looking about 7 years ago. This breeder was well known on the cat show circuit but what we saw absolutely shocked me, everything we encountered was a red flag. A horrendous choking stench of cat wee. Several shockingly manky adult cats. No sign of the mother. We were ushered into a living room and the breeder brought the two kittens in, it was obviously an alien environment to them and they promptly hid and resisted handling. I wanted to leave before the kittens even arrived in the room! We said no thanks.

    I can understand breeders tend to operate by word of mouth so don’t need to ‘advertise’, and once you know one or two good breeders it becomes a lot easier - but it can be difficult to break into what can seem like a closed circle.
     
  10. Rufus15

    Rufus15 Banned

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    @Ottery this is why I always recommend going to shows. People have busy lives and it's hard to keep websites updated, especially club websites that are run on a voluntary basis. Going to shows allows you to get the measure of the breeder and they of you.

    Sorry to hear about your bad experience
     
  11. Ottery

    Ottery Cat Lady

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    @Rufus15
    The problem is, the breeder was a regular at shows and was well thought-of by other breeders - they knew her from shows, they had never been to her house. Seeing her set up was a whole different thing to how she appeared in public. You just don't know until you actually visit! I do wonder what I would have thought if I hadn't visited good breeders in the past, would I have thought it was acceptable? Probably not, given the stench!
     
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  12. Rufus15

    Rufus15 Banned

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    I agree that showing isn't a guarantee of a good breeder, I was referring to your difficulty in finding a breeder
     
  13. Ottery

    Ottery Cat Lady

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    @Rufus15 sorry for the misunderstanding.
     
  14. Rufus15

    Rufus15 Banned

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    I think I came across blunter than I meant to, reading back. Apologies
     
  15. Ottery

    Ottery Cat Lady

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  16. Ade M

    Ade M PetForums Newbie

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    The bottom line with finding a pedigree cat: There is NO guarantee. Especially if its registered with GCCF etc.
    It is very simple, A GCCF or any other cat club offers NO GUARANTEES about the status or the breed of the cat.

    Until the registries GCCF - TICA or whatever include DNA passports to every registered cat, then they can say - they can guarantee that particular cat is bred down these lines.

    At the moment, breeders can and will abuse the system, because they hide behind the falsehood that their cats come from a particular line and they are a member of that cat registry.

    The whole concept of cat registries is based on the TRUST of each individual breeder.
    But until DNA registration of each cat becomes the norm, you just dont know what you are getting from a breeder.
     
  17. Rufus15

    Rufus15 Banned

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    There is no DNA test for breed.

    Registration is not a guarantee, which why it's important to research the breed and research breeders.
     
  18. vivien

    vivien PetForums VIP

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    You are so right I did everything right when I was looking for my Maine Coon. I went to a breeder that I thought was honest and good. But I was so wrong. My poor Yogi has been to hell and back in his 6 years. I thought oh well it’s just bad luck and we got him as well as he can be. He is on antirobe, or Zodon whichever our vet can get hold of. For the rest of his life. But I have found out since that there have been a few of her kittens that have been as poorly as my Yogi has. I am at the moment trying to help my friend who has one of her kittens he is now 4 years old and she doesn’t know like I didn’t if he will make it. I have offered her to send Yogi’s report from the Animal Health Trust to try and help her vet pinpoint what is wrong with her boy. Like Yogi the vet thinks it’s most likely neurological and possibly caused by toxoplasmosis. Breeders like this make me so angry, I am just praying she isn’t breeding any more. I would hate for someone to go through what I and my friend have and are going through. There are other people who have had kittens and have health issues.

    Viv xx
     
  19. Ade M

    Ade M PetForums Newbie

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    Sorry to hear about your furbaby, its heartbreaking when this happens. With breeding you never can tell what the litter can produce.
    It may be just bad recessive jeans in the mother and father have expressed themselves in this litter. It may be a bad breeder, who knows?
    It just can make up for the heartache and torment when dealing with a poorly kitten. You know the next kitten you get, may be just perfect.
     
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  20. vivien

    vivien PetForums VIP

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    Yogi is 6 years old now. We know that something can go wrong at any time. We dread this happening. We thank our lucky stars that the animal health trust found out what was wrong with him. Yogi is our last cat due to my age. I have my four boys Yogi Tiga Simba and Max. And our two girls. Gemma our GSD and Purdy our JRT. Our lives are all the more richer for them being with us. I am just so sad that my friend is going through what my Yogi went through and still does.
    Thank you for answering. It just brought it home to me when my friend told me that her cat is still struggling so badly with his health.

    Viv xx
     
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