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Feeding Wainwright's wet and dry food

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by rocky17, Oct 27, 2019.


  1. rocky17

    rocky17 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi,

    My pug is 9 months old and around 9kg, I am worried about his weight although he is active and enjoys his walks and has 2 walks a day. I have read that a male adult pug should be around 9kg as he is only 9 months and at this weight already I am worried I am feeding him too much.

    I am feeding him Wainwright's kibble and wet pouches but find the feeding guidlines confusing if you want to feed kibble and wet food together

    I am currently feeding him one wet pouch a day which is 150g and this is split into two meals a day. Then with the wet food I mix in the kibble around 35g each meal so feeding him 220g per day.I this too much? He does also get some treats in the evening as well

    I was thinking of halving the amount of wet food I give and only giving him half a pouch per day as he does sometimes have soft poo. So if I reduced the wet food to half a pouch how much kibble should I be feeding him?

    The feeding guidelines on the wet food says 4 pouches a day and kibble says between 160-190g per day, so I am unsure how much I should be giving if feeding wet and kibble together?

    Any advice would be appreciated
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    What is his body shape like? That's a better indicator than weight.
     
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  3. rocky17

    rocky17 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi Joanne
    Here is a photo
     

    Attached Files:

    #3 rocky17, Oct 27, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2019
  4. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    He looks like he should be cut down a bit. The suggested adult weight is only a guide, all breeds vary enormously in size and weight. My extremely lean 8kg poodle who is top height too is over the recommended weight but would be a skeleton if she weighed any less. I would just look at your dog's body condition and to me your dog looks rather overweight. I never really look at food recommendations but mine are on the wainwright trays (which you might find easier and cheaper than pouches) and they get round about half a tray split between 2 feeds in a day so around 150 grammes and a handful of kibble which is left down as they are not greedy and sometimes lasts 2 days. One of mine is skinny and will not eat any more, the other is nicely lean but if she starts to get more covering on her ribs I cut her down very slightly. My dogs are very active too.

    I would suggest you cut yours down a fair bit. Does he eat the kibble in one go or do you leave it down. How about cutting both the wet and kibble down a bit and see what happens. You can always cut it down or increase it after a month depending on the weight gain or loss. Trouble is most pugs are unhealthily fat. Someone on here has a pug which has a waist, maybe they will put up a photo to show you what a fit pug should look like.
     
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  5. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    Pug-History-01-500x499.jpg

    There is a picture of a nice condition pug with a bit of a waist.
     
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  6. rocky17

    rocky17 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi

    Thanks for you reply

    He tends to eat the wet food all in one go but does take longer to eat the kibble and will leave some of it and go back to it later.

     
  7. rocky17

    rocky17 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi

    Thanks for the replies so far. Here are some up to date photos taken this morning so you can see his body shape/type

    IMG_20191027_113836_exported_1554_1572176408778.jpg MVIMG_20191027_113811.jpg MVIMG_20191027_113208.jpg IMG_20191027_113836_exported_1554_1572176408778.jpg MVIMG_20191027_113811.jpg MVIMG_20191027_113208.jpg
     
  8. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    He's definitely as @Blitz says on the rotund side. At 9 months he should have stopped growing or there abouts being a toy breed.

    Definitely needs some weight off him.

    Am not sure if it's the pictures, but one of his leg seems 'turned out' brains a frazzled mess so can't remember the technical term. So if there is a slight problem there with the skeletal system again getting him to a healthy weight, as told by the body condition score system which is here
    BCS-Canine.jpg

    I know you are possibly thinking well he's a pug and all the pugs I see are rounder, it's normal. It really isn't. There are so many over weight dogs around that no one seems to know what at truly slim, well built dog looks like. I own toy breeds one being a chihuahua. I have been shown many a picture by fellow chihuahua owners as I have sat in my local dog friendly cafe with mine. She's a bit of I love attention type of dog. They have described their chi as muscular, powerful etc and have seen the same typical chi picture. Small head large body. That is an over weight chihuahua. No ifs nor buts. I have also been told my dogs need a good meal...

    The good thing is you are asking now. I have seen a lot worse at a young age, a border terrier springs to mind.
     
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  9. rocky17

    rocky17 PetForums Newbie

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    ............
     
    #9 rocky17, Oct 27, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2019
  10. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Puppy food will state a long guide for puppies up to 18 months as larger breeds take longer to mature.

    As the main difference between puppy food is most importantly calcium phosphorous ratio. Which is vital for growing puppies and is different to what grown dogs need. Although it does them no harm having this ratio at all. It's just vital for the early stages. Puppy food is also more energy dense. In laymen terms has more calories than other dog food.

    So switching now to adult food since he's fully grown is a good move as well as cutting down on food amounts. I think as you have found that feeding guides are extremely generous. Even for puppies. Although some dogs will need more, just like some humans can eat with out putting on weight and others just have to look at food and weight can pile on.

    Always compensate for treats too.. It's so easy to give many calories in treat form without even thinking about it.

    He looks a lovely happy dog, so I am sure you will get there with him.
     
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  11. Mum2Heidi

    Mum2Heidi PetForums VIP

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    I agree to cutting back a bit.
    Heidi is active and 3/4 of the recommended amounts of most foods (inc. Wainwrights is ample for her.
    Comparing the analysis of puppy and adult food may help you re the change over.
    I changed Heidi at 11 months. No particular reason.
    Whatever changes you decide, make them gradually so he can adjust.
    You will soon get to know you little man’s requirements.
     
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