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Feeding habits - recsue cat

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by Mazzle, Apr 18, 2011.


  1. Mazzle

    Mazzle PetForums Newbie

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    Hi all, hoping for some advice.

    As you may know, our little Clawdius recently came to us from a rescue. He had only been there for about 10 days before we took him home, and he came in as a stray. Staff at the rescue didn't know what his history was before that - how long he had been a stray, if he had ever been owner before etc (although I think he's too good with people to be completely wild)...

    My question is - I have always been told that cats will not eat unless they're hungry, unlike dogs, so as long as you're being sensible and giving them the right food, they should be fine. But since we got him home, he is eating everything! He cleans his bowl instantly, and cries for more, and always seems to be hungry. Should I continue to feed him when he wants and trust that he won't over eat? Or is this a natural thing, having been a stray, that he will try to eat as much as possible 'just in case', and should I try to teach him about regular, small meals?

    Many thanks!
     
  2. Ianthi

    Ianthi PetForums VIP

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    Hi there!

    We normally hear far more about the opposite problem! :)

    Just how much is he eating at the moment then? How old is he? It might well be due to his former lifestyle but if really excessive it could also point to an illness.
     
  3. Mazzle

    Mazzle PetForums Newbie

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    He is 3 years old, and quite skinny I think - taking him to the vet at weekend to get registered, so he should be able to tell us if he is underweight.

    We bought the same food that he has been having at the rescue, and mixed it in with a little bit of wet pouch food (just bog standard supermarket stuff!) and he wolfed it down instantly - not a fussy eater! We were recommended to feed him wet and dry mixed in morning, and some dry biscuits in evening - he's keeping everything down and going to the toilet ok, so luckily it seems we can feed him anything :)

    Husband fed him last night because he thought I hadn't done it yet - turns out bowl was just sparkling because he ate every last scrap! so he had rtwo days food yesterday, and still woke us up at 6am wanting breakfast!

    Hope it isn't worms or anything, but he seems perfectly healthy otherwise....
     
  4. Ianthi

    Ianthi PetForums VIP

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    If he's underweight then I would just feed him what he'll eat, within reason of course! Also I wonder if you fed him a good quality wet-personally I'd discontinue to dry- he might feel more replete. Now would be a good time considering his current good appetite!

    Not sure of his worming history but worms could certainly explain his current symptoms!
     
  5. missye87

    missye87 PetForums VIP

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    I would go out an buy some de-worming tablets asap! :)
    Also, I'm not sure if I've misunderstood, but do you give him meals at specific times and not leave food out during the day?

    As if he was used to being able to self-regulate then the change in eating habits could make him more hungry. He might just also be like Sooty, better off self-regulating his food. We are constantly re-filling his wet food to make sure he has some at all times, and leave him with dry food during the day if he needs any inbetween sleeping sessions.
     
  6. Mazzle

    Mazzle PetForums Newbie

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    We had originally planned to put food out at certain times and leave him enough for the whole day to eat as he likes, but he just demolishes everything put in front of him!
     
  7. missye87

    missye87 PetForums VIP

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    Sorry I couldn't help but giggle at the term demolish, it sounds exactly like what Sooty does :D. Considering you think he is a bit skinny I would go for the de-wormer, if that doesn't help just a trip to the vets to make sure everything is ok. You may just find that you might have to accept he has a huge appetite and might still even be growing. Sooty is a mog and he didn't stop until he was about 4-ish!

    Ems x
     
  8. hobbs2004

    hobbs2004 PetForums VIP

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    Woah, hold your horses for a minute guys! :)

    Personally I would wait with getting any worming stuff until the vet has seen him on Friday. Also, I wouldn't mind betting that he was wormed and flead in the rescue when he was first taken in. Is there any way that you can find out?

    And again, personally, I think his appetite and ability to demolish everything in sight is probably due to him not having had a steady food source for however long he was a stray. So, in my book it sounds as though he is making the best of the new situation where food just appears aplenty. He might relearn that there is a reliable food source and that he doesn't need to scoff everything in sight just in case it will not reappear next time or he might not.

    Also, as others have said, I would cut out the dry food (or perhaps invest in a treat ball so that he has to work for his food) and feed him mostly wet food.

    Finally, well done on taking him in! And I lurrve his name :D
     
  9. Mazzle

    Mazzle PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for all the replies everyone.

    I rang the RSPCA centre where we got him, and he has been thoroughly wormed :) I mentioned about the amount he's eating, and they reckon he's just being cheeky and trying to get as much food as possible. Apparently I need to only feed him 60g food twice a day, and that will be fine.

    He hadn't had his second injection when we got him, so need to get that done (booked in for Saturday) before I can take him to the vets to get his weight checked out etc :)

    Thanks for putting my mind at rest
     
  10. Jansheff

    Jansheff PetForums VIP

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    We took in a stray and went through a similar experience, except Raffles didn't just stop at crying for more, he went round the house on the rob, positively hunting for it. Nothing was safe, he managed to get through sealed packets of sausage rolls, chew through the foil packets and help himself to cat food and we couldn't turn our back for even a second while we were cooking. :nono: In fact that's how he got his name, Raffles, named after the Victorian gentleman burglar in the book of the same name! :D

    We mentioned it to the vet and she said that the penny hadn't yet dropped that he didn't have to be constantly on the scavenge any more, and as soon as he realised that his bowl would be filled with food, he would relax and his eating would become more normal. It did, can't remember how long it took as its about 5 years ago now. The stealing stopped as well, in fact out of all our 3 cats he's now the least greedy. :)
     
    #10 Jansheff, Apr 18, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2011
  11. hobbs2004

    hobbs2004 PetForums VIP

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    60g twice a day? Dry food I presume? What dry food do they think you are feeding him?

    Just like to point out that this is double the recommended amount for "normal" sized cats - that will make a porker out of him in no time :rolleyes:
     
  12. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    He may never lose his food anxiety, but feeding smaller meals more often can help. I agree with those who said to eliminate the dry food. It will just make him hungrier, as carbs do to all of us.

    Keep track of how much you are feeding him. When he fills out to where he should be, cut back gradually. If you are feeding several small meals a day, this will be easy, just cut back slightly on the size of each small meal.

    I have a rescued stray, she's been here almost 4 years now, and she still has food anxiety. She's a little plumper than she should be because vet recommended I feed her a little more, to help assuage that driving need. I feel bad for her because she always wants to eat, even though you can tell by looking at her that she gets plenty.

    I feed a grain free canned diet, small meals spaced apart as I suggested to you. I add water to her food to help slow her down and help her feel more full.

    It's easy to do. Just take the quantity you would feed as one lump in the morning, and break it up into three meals offered every 30 minutes instead. Add a little water to each serving.

    If you are home during the day, fit in a mid day snack. Same at night, and also a last snack before bed.
     
  13. koekemakranka

    koekemakranka PetForums VIP

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    This is true. When I got a rescue female a bit over two years ago, she was Greed personified. There was also regular kitchen thieving taking place. Apparently she had been abandoned by her owners who moved out without her. About a years ago, she stopped the wolfing of food and stealing. I have recently adopted a new rescue cat who also displays this excessive greed and thievery. I am sure it will pass, though (I hope so, nothing is safe).
     
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