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fear and aggression

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by richie, Jun 22, 2010.


  1. richie

    richie PetForums Newbie

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    i need some help, i really dont know what to do. 2 weeks ago my 1 year old gsd bitch millie was attacked by 2 husky type dogs they even chased her out of the park and home. since this millie has no tollerence of other dogs she starts to panic and then goes into attack mode and i dont know what to do. she is great with people and the other dogs in the family but when it comes to other dogs she just goes bonkers.

    richie
     
  2. Rottiefan

    Rottiefan PetForums VIP

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    Have you got in touch with a professional? If not, you should. Your dog needs to regain its trust in other dogs that has obviously been shattered by her ordeal. I could write some things here, but quite honestly, you're much better getting in touch with a professional before this problem develops any further.
     
  3. tripod

    tripod PetForums VIP

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    Poor girl - she has had an awfully distressing incident at a crucial time in her socialisation experience but while she is still young and maleable please get some help with this. Otherwise it is likely to escalate - get help from an APDT trainer and/or APBC behaviourist.
     
  4. richie

    richie PetForums Newbie

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    hi ive been trying to gather info about some behaviourists in my area and im going to phone some in the morning. was just seeing if anyone has had similar problems.
     
  5. dodigna

    dodigna PetForums VIP

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    where about are you, some one might be able to advise specifically to your area. I would be prone to see some one who uses dogs to help her regain some confidence, the right dogs will be able to put her at ease again.

    I see a groups that run socialization classes, they run a group specific to shy dogs where most are fear aggressive, they go for walks and the behaviourists' dogs make sure no other dogs bother the clients' dogs. My dog is not fear aggressive, but very nervy and we are part of the other group (the naughty dogs so to speak), but at times we have joined in the shy group if he got spooked by something to help him recover, his demeanor changes instantly with calmer dogs around.
     
  6. Rottiefan

    Rottiefan PetForums VIP

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    I agree, this set-up would be an excellent way to help your dog! If you can find one of course...

    Unfortunately, this is a hard behaviour to fix without the appropriate facilities e.g. other dogs and a lot of time and patience. I have never had this specifically, although I have worked with dogs who have had fears of other things. The best way to help these dogs is to make them face their fears, making it a really positive experience for them, again. So, in regards to your case, using other dogs that are well-balanced and sociable will be a massive help.

    Does your dog have any local 'friends' that you walk with sometimes?
     
  7. richie

    richie PetForums Newbie

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    thanks for the reply's guys im in cardiff so if anybody knows of anywhere that would be cool. i dont care what ive got to do or what it costs i just want my pup back to being how she was.
     
  8. dodigna

    dodigna PetForums VIP

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  9. hyperruby

    hyperruby PetForums Newbie

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    Hi Ritchie,

    My dog suffered the same experience as yours, I'm taking her to see an expert at 3pm today, I will give you feedback on what he says, this may help you as we are in a simular situation.

    Des & Ruby

    Ritchie,
    Just to say that I took Ruby to dog trainer yesterday, we sat in the corner and the trainer observed how she interacted with the puppies (Ruby is an adult dog by the way) He made me walk past them as they were going through their exercises and Ruby was fine, she was sniffing then moving on, again as I already know that a little pup ran over to her to play and Ruby got anxious and lashed out a little, again this was simply down to fear. After the session the god trainer suggested the following:

    * Take her to a new location for a couple of weeks for walks
    * If I can chat to another god owner and explain Ruby's situation and let her try and play with another dog under close supervision in order to try and build up her trust.
    * Get her off the lead again asap.
    * Keep calm

    I didn’t take her out today to gave her a break, but I will go on my morning walk tomorrow and try this, hope these suggestions may help you!
     
    #9 hyperruby, Jul 3, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2010
  10. richie

    richie PetForums Newbie

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    thanks for the comments, got abit of an update on this, me and millie have been to a dog trainer and it turns out that she is trying to be the dominant dog. but then gets scared when the other dogs dont back down. we have now started training with discs and all seems to be going well.
     
  11. dodigna

    dodigna PetForums VIP

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    The problem I see with this sort of advice is that she started being aggressive after being attacked and I don't see the logic in using a punishment to curb this aggression :confused: I bet you see results with the disk as it stops her in her tracks (for now...), but then i am no expert and would not claim to be, ultimately nobody here has seen this behaviour first hand.

    Really try to watch your dog body language though, does she look uncertain and worried when you use the disk? You risk damaging and already volatile relationship with her. When my dog gets into a fearful state, whether when he was attacked or when he gets one of his phobia I have to tread on egg shell and be very careful how I deal with it.
    After we was attacked I was there and unable to prevent it or protect him so he started having a go at dogs first, once I took charge and physically blocked the dogs from approaching him he was happy to stay behind and started trusting me again. What I am saying to you is that if I added a telling off (which I did at first if he was to kick off at dogs), he would stop the behaviour, yes, but the frequency with which he would display the behaviour started increasing as the poor lad had no hope in me helping let alone understand him.
     
  12. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Trying to be the dominant dog? (Insert name of whatever deity you choose) give me strength! This is nothing to do with dominance. Of course, having been attacked, she's trying to prevent herself being attacked again by coming on strong. It's a different thing altogether. Throwing nasty rattly objects at her when she displays the result of fear is going to do nothing to improve her confidence in herself or in you.

    You'd be much better off walking with dogs she knows and trusts, and gradually meeting more friendly dogs, first at some distance, gradually getting closer, using treats and a calm, in-control demeanor. There are trainers out there that have come out of the dark ages.
     
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