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False or phantom pregnancy

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by katie25, Sep 13, 2013.


  1. katie25

    katie25 PetForums Junior

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    Hi

    I have a few questions regarding the difference between a false and real pregnancy in dogs, I have 4 dogs bassett hound bitch, yorkie bitch, shi Tzu dog & a staffie dog.
    My bassett girl has been acting strangely, she is just over a year not spayed.
    She usually sleeps downstairs but at night has started crying and howling to come up stairs with us and is digging around and pulling at cushions/covers etc.. she has milk come in too which I know is all a sign of false pregnancy, she is very growly towards our male dogs but not our little yorkie and is very tired and sleeps most of the day, she is much more loving at the moment (always was but more so now) I am going to get her booked in with the Vet as soon as but was just wondering if there are any signs to tell between a false and real pregnancy.
    My boys are fixed by the way, I don't know where she would have got pregnant if she is but I assuming a false.

    Would love to know if there are any differences as have been looking up all day and not found any real advice on how to tell the difference, or is there no difference between the two. (apart from actual puppies of course)

    Thanks :)
     
  2. Sleeping_Lion

    Sleeping_Lion Banned

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    I've only had one real pregnancy and one false pregnancy, and the only difference really was that the false one was more what I expected of a real one, where as the real one kept me guessing. Indie nested and dug about when she had her phantom, which followed shortly after her first season. Tau I thought I hadn't caught in time (planned mating) and assumed she wasn't pregnant (although had plans in place if she actually was) until she started to *blossom*.

    Are you 100% sure she couldn't have been caught? I would keep a close eye on her and pop her to the vets; if it's definitely a phantom, they may be able to give her something to stop the milk coming through. I got in touch with a recommended homeopathic vet and the treatment was very effective, she cleared up within a week of starting on the drops they sent me.
     
  3. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Signs of a phantom pregnancy can be virtually the same as a real one, increased appetite, weight gain, enlarged teats and even producing milk, some as it progresses can even start to collect up inanimate objects often toys and carry them around and treat them like babies and even nest.
    Its quite common for them to become clingy and whingey and whine with a phantom too.

    If your boys have been neutered, and there is no way another entire male could have gotten to her or she hasn't been left in the garden unsupervised (as it has been known for neighbourhood males to jump fences and get in supposedly secure gardens to a female in heat, you should be OK and likely it is a phantom, but if there is the slightest doubt its possible better to get her checked out.
     
  4. katie25

    katie25 PetForums Junior

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    Thanks for all the info, she seems to have calmed down with it all at the moment so fingers crossed its a false.
    Not that there is anything wrong with cross breeds but I wouldn't even know who dad would be so not good.

    I had been thinking it would be lovely to have a litter and keep a pup but had trouble finding a stud dog, does anyone on here know of anyone or does breed bassetts fairly close to me, I live in midhurst in Sussex.
    She is KC reg and is beautiful girl I will post some pics so maybe some Bassett breeder can take a look.
    What tests would I need to get done first?
    I know that sometimes bassetts can need caesarean which would be no prob for us but wouldn't want to put her through any unnecessary hurt, I c section needed very common in Bassetts?

    Just collecting info at the moment/thinking it through.
     
  5. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Bassets are one of the Kennel club high profile breeds on the health watch.
    There are a lot of tests available to check for genetic diseases before breeding.

    BVA/KC schemes exist for:-
    Hip Dysplasia
    Elbow Dysplasia
    Eye tests Goniodysgenesis

    There is also DNA Tests available for
    Immunideficiency
    Thrombopathia which is a blood platelet disorder and
    Laforas Disease which is a specific form of epilepsy known in the Basset.

    There are other health conditions known in the breed to that there are not health tests for.

    More details on the following link.

    Basset Hound – Dog Breed Health

    The decision to breed is one that needs a lot of research and can be a very costly affair. Should you run into problems during pregnancy and whelping none of which can be claimed for on normal pet insurance a caesarean section can run easily into four figures. So it is vital that you have funds put aside and thoroughly do research before hand.

    One good website although American that is very good is the AKC Breeders resources. It takes you through in a very simple form from thinking about breeding your dog right through to rehoming puppies, not a comprehensive fully detailed account by any means, but it does give you a check list for all the things you will need to consider and then study and improve your knowledge in a lot more detail. It also has suggested other reading on each subject.

    Another really invaluable book to read and research is the Book of the Bitch.

    http://images.akc.org/pdf/breeders/resources/guide_to_breeding_your_dog.pdf

    Even when you get to the pregnancy and whelping stage, there can be many problems, which can result in the death of mum and pups if you don't know what you are doing. A few example are on the link, just some of the most common whelping problems

    The 6 most common problems during and post whelping (canine pregnancy)
    Breeding and doing it properly is a very big commitment in obtaining knowledge, doing research and in time and financially too, and one that shouldn't be taken lightly.

    Once you have done the necessary research, next best step would likely be to seek information from the Basset breed club.

    Basset Hound Club index
     
  6. Sleeping_Lion

    Sleeping_Lion Banned

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    Excellent post from SDH, just to add from the perspective of breeding, and I've only done it the once so far, but if you want to go through an unforgettable experience of self doubting, loathing, more snot and tears than you would ever want your vet to see you with on your face, and possibly end up with a lower bank balance by a good amount than when you started out, then breeding dogs is the way to go.

    Joking aside, and I am considering breeding from my current two youngsters pending health test results and how they mature, but it is an expensive business, the health test results alone for my two will probably set me back over £1k, I have some whelping equipment to replace from the first litter, and am possibly looking at using a dog in Germany, with a visit before hand to see how he is in the flesh, that's not going to be cheap. Using a dog because it's local is not a good reason, they need to be a good match for your bitch, and they need to fit in with your *aims* - there aren't that many lines in the UK for my flatcoat bitch that I would want to use right now, but there are some old UK lines in a few dogs in Germany that might make a good match for her.

    As for the actual litter arriving, it's really not easy, and ok, I had it hard with my first litter so far, it was an emergency c-section on a Sunday morning, and I lost two of the eight pups she had, which was heart breaking. Vets bills alone relating to those two pups and the section were approx £3k. It's a thought I'm sure a lot of people have, that it'd be nice to have a litter, or a pup from their boy, but in reality if you do it the right way, utilising health testing, choosing a stud dog that is the best match for her no matter what the expense, and even making the decision not to breed after you've started out with the whole process, it really isn't easy. Most importantly, it's also not without risks to your girl, so even if you convinced yourself it would be something worth looking at, you have to ask yourself if you're willing to put your bitch through that risk, because that much I can guarantee you fills you with guilt, and I will never forget sitting in the vet waiting room at 7am on a Sunday morning, with snot and tears all over my face, looking like I'd slept on the kitchen floor for three nights in a row because I actually had, and having to make the decision to put my girl through a c-section knowing it was me that had chosen to put her in that position in the first place. Thankfully, dogs don't hold grudges, and even though I am thinking about repeating the process with my two youngsters, one of whom is the daughter I kept back from that litter, it's not a decision I will take lightly for either of them, and may not go ahead depending on what results we get, and my thoughts closer to the time.

    And if you got through all that, well done, get yourself a cuppa :)
     
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