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Doops biting!

Discussion in 'Small Animal Chat' started by Loubi, Sep 12, 2020.


  1. Loubi

    Loubi PetForums Newbie

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    Hello everyone,
    I got two doops (females) about three weeks ago.
    Firstly I have spoken to some rescue centres and they say they should be apart and will fight soon?
    Also one of the gerbils is biting so much. She did not at first but my daughter wants to play in the day so I have woken them, Rosie is biting when she gets picked up. I suppose I should not wake them but they sleep all day so when should I handle them?
    Also Rosie now hides when I open the tank and speak to them!
    I am worried... a rescue centre said they could take her as they should be split up but I feel so bad. No room for two tanks. They are big!
    Any advice would help.
    Thanks.
     
  2. ForestWomble

    ForestWomble PetForums VIP

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    What are doops?
     
  3. Loubi

    Loubi PetForums Newbie

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    Duprasi gerbils.
     
    ForestWomble likes this.
  4. ForestWomble

    ForestWomble PetForums VIP

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    Ah I see, Thank you.

    I have Mongolian gerbils and am not familiar with doops, but having just looked them up and having a quick read from this site: http://www.crittery.co.uk/index.php...d,to the pet trade and some initial confusion it says on here that they are best housed alone.

    You must never wake a sleeping gerbil unless it is an emergency, that is most likely why Rosie is biting, she is tired and annoyed that she is being woken up. According to that site I linked to above, they are similar to the Mon. gerbils in that they have periods of being awake and periods of sleep throughout the day, with dusk and dawn being their most active times.
    They are normally easy to handle being slow moving and docile, so if you can get a routine going of feeding them at the same time every day, they may learn to wake up then and you could get them out and handle them at that time, or else just keep an eye on them and see when they naturally get up.

    Rosie needs to re-learn that hands are safe, start off by offering her treats and gradually over time she'll hopefully learn that you are OK again.
     
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