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Don't put your dogs lives in danger.

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by emilylp, Aug 11, 2009.


  1. emilylp

    emilylp PetForums VIP

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    To many dogs are dying through careless owners leaving them in cars with no windows open or leaving them in the sun to long hot days!

    Dogs normal body temperature is about 101 F to 102 F. When the temperature climbs, the dog’s body begins to dehydrate and the blood thickens, putting strain on the heart and decreasing circulation to vital organs and tissues. Organ failure and death can occur quickly if measures are not taken immediately to bring the temperature down. Even in dogs that recover, sometimes organ damage is irreversible, causing lifelong health problems. Dogs who have overheated once are more susceptible to overheating again.


    Dog owners need to know the signs of overheating in dogs so that cooling measures can be taken quickly.

    Symptoms to watch for include:
    •Profuse and rapid panting
    •Bright red tongue
    •Thick drooling saliva
    •Wide eyes with a glassy look
    •Lack of coordination
    •Vomiting
    •Diarrhea
    •Coma
    •Dizziness or disorientation

    Preventing Heat Stroke

    There are ways you can prevent heat stroke from happening in the first place.
    >NEVER leave your dog alone in the car on a warm day, regardless of whether the windows are open. Even if the weather outside is not extremely hot, the inside of the car acts like an oven - temperatures can rise to dangerously high levels in a matter of minutes.
    >Avoid vigorous exercise on warm days. When outside, opt for shady areas.
    >Keep fresh cool water available at all times.
    >Certain types of dogs are more sensitive to heat - especially obese dogs and brachycephalic (short-nosed) breeds, like Pugs and Bulldogs. Use extreme caution when these dogs are exposed to heat.
    What to do if You Suspect Heat Stroke
    >For some certain long haired fluffy dogs such as chow's shaving can also help them stay cooler unless the breed is stated that its fur keeps it cool anyway

    If you have even the slightest suspicion that your dog is suffering from heat stoke, you must take immediate action.

    1.move your dog out of the heat and away from the sun right away.
    2.Begin cooling your dog by placing cool, wet rags or washcloths on the body - especially the foot pads and around the head.
    3.DO NOT use ice or very cold water! Extreme cold can cause the blood vessels to constrict, preventing the body's core from cooling and actually causing the internal temperature to further rise. In addition, over-cooling can cause hypothermia, introducing a host of new problems. When the body temperature reaches 103°, stop cooling.
    4.Offer your dog cool water, but do not force water into your dog's mouth.
    5.Call or visit your vet right away - even if your dog seems better. Internal damage might not be obvious to the naked eye, so an exam is necessary (and further testing may be recommended).

    Don't risk your dogs life keep them cool in the summer and out of overheated cars!
     
    #1 emilylp, Aug 11, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2009
  2. Miss.PuddyCat

    Miss.PuddyCat PetForums VIP

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    I think also if the dog is extremly fluffy or furry maybe a possible buzz to remove excess hair may help?
     
  3. emilylp

    emilylp PetForums VIP

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    just added it in :)
     
  4. foxy roxy

    foxy roxy PetForums Member

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    could i just mention that i have an alaskan mal and i have read that you should never clip or shave them as there coats help them to stay cool in the summer and warm in winter i do agree about the rest of your post and clip certain dogs but not all should be clipped thank you if anyone knows different could you please let us know many thanks
     
  5. Badger's Mum

    Badger's Mum PetForums VIP

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    My springer seem's cooler with a full coat
     
  6. Acacia86

    Acacia86 PetForums VIP

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    Isn't it something to do with the guard hairs??
     
  7. Badger's Mum

    Badger's Mum PetForums VIP

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    yeah i couldn't remeber the the name, I had him clipped last year and and he was a lot hotter.
     
  8. emilylp

    emilylp PetForums VIP

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    Sorry ive tried to correct it properly, i have put some breeds need shaving others dont if there coat keeps them cool anyway, sorry for that and thats for the correction :)
     
  9. foxy roxy

    foxy roxy PetForums Member

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    thats ok just thought i would mention it and thank you some very good tips though :)
     
  10. emilylp

    emilylp PetForums VIP

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    thanks :D , its because i was reading a site yesterday and lots of dogs have died in over heated cars, and not long back 2 police dogs (GSD) died in a police car when they were left in the car, it wasnt purposly of course but they just got to hot and died ;/
     
  11. sequeena

    sequeena PetForums VIP

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    Yes and I hope the officer is punished accordingly :mad: As a GSD owner myself I couldn't believe it :(
     
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