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Dog's started barking at night

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by avl1982, Aug 18, 2009.


  1. avl1982

    avl1982 PetForums Junior

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    Hello All,

    I'm hoping that some of you may have some ideas how to deal with this.

    My parents went away on holiday, leaving me with the dog and elderly cat for 4 weeks. The cat passed away last week and since then (may or may not be related) the dog has started barking at night.

    It's something she has done a lot in the past, only she usually barks once or twice and then stops. She's now started barking and won't stop, to the point where I have to go downstairs (she sleeps in the kitchen) to get her to be quiet. I did that last night and then she started barking again, so my fiance went and put her in the living room. She stopped after that, but this morning when I left for work I fed her and let her out and put her back in the kitchen. My fiance said she started barking again after I'd left and we're reaching the end of our tether now. I am a light sleeper so being disturbed leaves me tired and grumpy in the morning, and my fiance works shifts so didn't get in until nearly 1am and needed to sleep through the morning but was woken by the dog.

    He even put her out in the garden but she barked there too.

    I really don't know what to do, as I don't want to inadvertantly reinforce the behaviour, but how do we stop it without having too many more disturbed nights?

    Any suggestions would be more than welcomed.

    Thanks in advance
    Abi
     
  2. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Is the dog out of her normal home?

    If so, and her companion has just died, she probably feels lonely and lost. Could she sleep in your room, or just outside so she can smell your presence, hear your breathing. She is more likely to be quiet if she feels you are close.

    I wouldn't bother about reinforcing this behaviour in these circumstances. When she is settled and has adjusted to the loss of the cat, she should be able to sleep downstairs again.
     
  3. avl1982

    avl1982 PetForums Junior

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    Hi Burrowzig,

    Thanks for your message. She is in her normal home as we still live with my parents so no change for her there. Also, because the cat was so old, she spent most of her time asleep in my parents room and probably didn't see the dog very much, which is why I question whether this has had any influence on the situation.

    I appreciate your advice but worry that this would distrupt all of us and perhaps not solve the problem? She can be quite a naughty dog (getting into things, etc) which is why she sleeps in the kitchen, as there isn't too much for her to knock over, get into etc. We always talk about de-Callyfying a room! (she's called Cally)!

    I will certainly bare your advice in mind but I'm afraid for me, this would be a last resort.

    Thanks
    Abi
     
  4. hazel pritchard

    hazel pritchard PetForums VIP

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    The last 2 times i have had to go away my daughter has house/dog sat for me,the dogs both know her,but one of my dogs started to bark in the night,it does not matter how many times daughter or her hubby got up to him,as soon as they went back to bed he started again,once we were home he continued to do this for a few nights,we have put it down to his barking was his way of saying he is confused where we have gone,
    My daughter will not dog sit for us anymore,mind you i dont blame her,as we found it very tiring to keep getting up to his barking when we returned home.
    Sorry i dont have an answer for you,just thought i would let you know i know how you feel with the lack of sleep.
     
  5. lemmsy

    lemmsy PetForums VIP

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    I agree. I was just about to come along and say exactly that.
     
  6. andy2009

    andy2009 PetForums Newbie

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    sounds like a renewed need for attention that is lacking at night time...
     
  7. PoisonGirl

    PoisonGirl Banned

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    Hi, the dog is probably a bit confused, your parents have gone away, she will sense that the cat died, so is probably wanting reassured and a bit of attention.

    I would let her sleep with you a while, so you all get some sleep and she might feel a bit more secure :)

    Once your parents are home, then you will know if it's because they were away, or maybe the dog just needs to get used to not having the cat in the house.

    xx
     
  8. avl1982

    avl1982 PetForums Junior

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    Hello all,

    Just thought I'd update you. Thanks for all your messages, it's been really useful to hear your thoughts.

    In a moment of frustration, my fiance moved the dog into the living room, and this is where she has slept every night since. And we haven't heard a peep out of her! I don't know why really, but I'm not questioning it. Maybe she doesn't hear noises in the garden, or she's just more comfortable...who knows.

    What I have realised though is that when a pet misbehaves the conclusion a lot of people jump to is that they're just being naughty...and I was guilty of this with the dog's barking. But when I think about it, maybe noises in the garden unsettled or upset her. I think she's happier now! As are we!!

    Thanks all
    Abi
     
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